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I have a power pack with both AC and DC terminals  as of right now each terminal is powering 1 set of lights each.  The AC is powering the lights on my MTH station.  The DC is powering some LED lights i have added to the same station.

I want to power a second building with LED lights.  I have use the LED lighting strips.   My thought is I should be using the DC power side of the power pack.  When I apply the wires to that side I do not get any lighting.  When I apply to the AC the second building lights up.  

Does this makes sense?  seems it should work on the DC side.

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When you connected the second set of LEDs to the DC side of your powerpack, did you make sure to match polarity (power pack positive to LED positive, and negative to negative)?

If so, it may be helpful to know the brand and model # of the LEDs your using for the second building, the DC voltage your power pack is putting out and the voltage the LED's need to operate.

1)  The box shows specs for 3 different models with different wattages, which one do you have?

2) Is your power pack putting out 12Volts DC?

3) What is the DC wattage output capability of your Powerpack?

4) When you add up all the wattages of everything connected to the DC side of the powerpack, is that number greater than the powerpack's max DC output?

All good questions - of which I know none of the answers.   As you can see I am more of a plug and play kinda of guy

however- your questions did make think - I didn’t have enough power so I turned up the voltage and ……lights

But with that said    I do need to figure out how much this power pack can power so this generates a couple other questions

1. while- more power seems obvious - that same lesser power lit them up on the AC side so  didn’t think that was the issue why is that?

2. I have attached a pic of the light I was powering at the lesser voltage - only four of those so it needs a lot less power

So is there a problem with mixing lights that have differing voltage needs?

Thanks for your time and help

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Please see my answers within the quote box

@msp posted:

All good questions - of which I know none of the answers.   As you can see I am more of a plug and play kinda of guy

however- your questions did make think - I didn’t have enough power so I turned up the voltage and ……lights It was a matter of too little voltage to turn on those LEDs

But with that said    I do need to figure out how much this power pack can power so this generates a couple other questions

1. while- more power seems obvious - that same lesser power lit them up on the AC side so  didn’t think that was the issue why is that? Probably different voltages set on AC side, vs the DC side.

2. I have attached a pic of the light I was powering at the lesser voltage - only four of those so it needs a lot less power yes probably, but they may also have different voltage requirements.

So is there a problem with mixing lights that have differing voltage needs? Yes.  If one set of LEDs is designed to run on 12VDC and another is intended to run on somewhere between 2 and 3 VDC they can't share the same power source, unless extra measures are taken.  12V will quickly burn out he lower voltage LEDs.

Thanks for your time and help

DC Electricity is somewhat analogous to water flowing through a hose.

Voltage is like Pressure.

Current (in Amps) is like the volume of water flowing at a given instant in time and is limited by the diameter of the hose.

In the transformer, current is limited by the size of wire in the transformer and is often different on different outputs.

Electrical power is (Volts X Amps) and is measured in Watts.  Using the analogy, water power is gallons per minute.

If you try to pass too much power through the transformer, it will overload usually tripping it's circuit breaker hopefully before overheating occurs.

AC and DC voltages are different, because in AC the current flow changes directions 60 times per second.

This is not meant to be all inclusive, but intended to provide a little better understanding of electricity.  I hope this is helpful.

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