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I will start with my first and favorite Scratch Built Layout Building, a $10 Round House built in 1980 using 1940s-1950s building methods like brick paper.

 

Round House Construction

The first consideration in building a $10 round house is to decide how many stalls the RH will have. 

I think the minimum that looks good is three.  Many more can be added than three but I find that you cannot see and enjoy your engines as much when they are in the RH as all that one sees is the engine fronts.  I decided to make my RH a four stall one and I am very pleased with it.  It has a good shape verses a three stalls and fits my area very well.

I like the stepped roof style RH and I like lots of windows so as they are typical of the era as electric lights were not all that common in the early times and windows provided daylight.  I have windows on both sides, all along the back wall and on the stepped roof wall facing the front.  I did not leave room or have room for a shop or tool room that many RH have.

My round house is made from my typical 1/8 inch thick, one side smooth Masonite tempered sheeting.  A sheet costs about $13 for 4ft x 8ft sheet and you will only need one half of a sheet or less (Home Depot may sell you a 1/2 sheet).  I cut this with saber saw, or jig saw.  I used my old Craftsman 18 inch jig saw with 1/3 hp motor to cut out the windows after drilling a hole to allow get the blade in the window area.  You can use a sabre saw for this if that is all you have.  The smooth side is put on the outside of the sides and back wall as brick paper will be glued on.  Some 1/8” Masonite strips were used to reinforce the bottom and door frame. 

Front of Round House

IMG_0095

The outside walls will be covered with modeling brick paper, glued on with Elmer’s white glue after the building is assembled with Elmer’s glue.

The roof is made from Masonite too but the rough side is up to be the exposed roof surface, to simulate  gravel on a wood and tar paper roof.  I have a step in the roof with windows in the bricked section between the two roofs so the roof is made in two parts. 

 

Four Tracks and four Stalls in Round House

IMG_0098

 

You can see how I determined the size of the RH by fitting it in over 4 sections of track.  It is about 30 inches wide and 17 deep.  I made sure not to include my one section where I can drive on the TT and directly to this one section with a long consist of engine, coal tender, wrecking crane car and wrecking caboose.

The picture below shows how I had to cut out part of the rear of the RH to go over a Marx switch machine housing.  It also shows I had make sure the RH did not get too close to the tracks.  It is a tight and custom fit.

 

Rear of Round House - wall over switch machine, Electrical connector (from 9 volt batteries) for RH lights right of switchIMG_0100

Both roofs were made in four sections.  I assembled the RH with Elmer’s glue and added plywood angles to strength the wall to roof joints.  I painted the inside walls brown and the inside roof light gray to better illuminate the inside.  The outside of the roof was painted light gray, with a dusting of black paint to be dark dirt.  Then I installed the brick paper doing a good job around the windows.

The windows are made from clear plastic sheeting from boxes lids from toys or other heavier clear plastic.  The windows had panes made from black 1/16 inch auto pin striping on the inside.  The windows were glued on the inside with "Pliobond" rubber cement, but contact cement, E6000 glue or Aleen's Tacky glue will work.

Inside RH showing Roof and wall braces, windows and some lightsIMG_0165

 

Picture showing double thick front wall and thicker bottom brace.  I painted the center of the tracks in the RH black to simulate a pit below the tracks to let workers work on the under side of the steam locomotives (shown in picture below).IMG_0173

 

I made RH stacks, with covers to keep rain out.  The stacks are to help remove smoke for the steam engines.  Balsa wood was used to make the stacks.  I like the square style stacks better than round ones.  Rain covers for the stacks were made.   I also installed a ladder or two to get on the roof.  Ladders were made from N gauge railroad tie plastic strips with the rails removed and every other tie cut out with a pair of diagonal wire pliers and trimmed with a X-acto knife.

Ladder, stacks and Roof, and also emergency generator from Lionel searchlight carIMG_0167

  Close up photo of a Stack with cover and dust on top!IMG_0169

 

Lights were installed in the ceiling of the RH in two rows and are operated by a slide switch on the control panel.   I am big on night train operation with the room lights dark or dimmed and lots of controlled lights in all building, flood lights, street lights, yard lights, cars and engines, etc. 

See how the lights let the engines show up in the RH in a semi dark roomIMG_0195

 

Photo showing the balsa wood TT operator shack (made from balsa wood) on TT bridge and view into RH.  The TT operator shake has a small grain of wheat light inside that comes on when power is applied to the TT track and the selected RH stall track.IMG_0197

Photo from outside into lighted up RHIMG_0201

 

Another neat photo of lighted RH in semi darkness, just to encourage you to build a TT and RHIMG_0203

I chose not to make doors for the front of the RH as I wanted to see the fronts of the locos inside and I would have had the doors open most of the time and they would just get in the view and way.

I love my round house and it is my favorite building on the layout and the most fun and satisfaction to build.

Charlie

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Last edited by Choo Choo Charlie
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John, that was  hotel Cooley House built in Springfield Ma next to the train station which later became the Hotel Charles. The part I built had burned but the larger section still exists. My wife's grandfather from New York had lived there while here working as a farm equipment salesman. I really loved the design and history besides the connection.

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Genecm

Wow those building are first class and look like they were professional made.  Yours make my 50s style Masonite and brick paper buildings look like, well, homemade 50s style built buildings.

Tell us how you cut and shape and glue Polystyrene.

Super job.

ACHRMatt, side hack, pennsynut and all others, great building, etc and job building them for sure.

I am glad I started this topic and this is the first few hours.

Charlie

Last edited by Choo Choo Charlie

My most recently completed building is a combination of kitbashing Ameritowne fronts and scratch building a station facade.  Here is the unpainted kitbash of the building itself.  The large black opening in the center is where the train station facade will go.  I wanted to base the station on Suburban Station on the PRR in Philadelphia.  My station is in the town of Annville, so it will be Annville Station.

07 before

Here is the prototype Suburban Station front.

01 front

My Annville Station front, built with Plastruct sheets, letters from Todd Architectural Models, windows/doors/fancy trim from Grandt Line and a working clock ($7 wrist watch from Wal Mart with a LOT of work to make the decorative enclosure).

02 front

Wider view of the prototype:

03 side

and of the model:

04 side

Finally, from the street looking up at the prototype:

05a tall

and a similar view of the model.

06 tall

Still to come are the interiors and some light weathering, but I'm very happy with the way it came out.

Oh yeah, here are the before and after photos:

07 before

08 after

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Last edited by Bob
@Bob posted:

My most recently completed building is a combination of kitbashing Ameritowne fronts and scratch building a station facade.  Here is the unpainted kitbash of the building itself.  The large black opening in the center is where the train station facade will go.  I wanted to base the station on Suburban Station on the PRR in Philadelphia.  My station is in the town of Annville, so it will be Annville Station.

My Annville Station front, built with Plastruct sheets, letters from Todd Architectural Models, windows/doors/fancy trim from Grandt Line and a working clock ($7 wrist watch from Wal Mart with a LOT of work to make the decorative enclosure).

Bob, that is absolutely stunning. I love the art deco facade. I was going make a small observation, that the top floor of the structure, rising one story above the neighboring structures, broke the illusion by revealing the lack of depth and suggest eliminating it, but in the last photo, I see a return wall has been added. Is this entire structure set out some distance from the backdrop, or is this something you added in Photoshop?

"Is this entire structure set out some distance from the backdrop, or is this something you added in Photoshop?"

Will, all of the city structures sit away from the backdrop.  In fact, an elevated track runs behind them.

Annville Platform1

The station platform sits "underground" beneath the street.  The stairs descend from the station to the platform.

Annville Platform2

Annville Platform3

The ends of the street are disguised by a few foreground buildings on each end. 

Annville 6

Annville 2

Here's the station under the city.

Annville Platform4

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Here’s a few of the scratch builds I’ve done. The drive-in entry is from a still existing prototype structure outside of Portland Or., the tenement building is (I think) from a design by Walthers in HO scale, the burlesque building is from an HO design by Foscale Limited, the garage is just my own design. 

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Choo Choo Charlie...

I usually plot a plan of a building on graph paper then transfer the dimensions to the Polystyrene and cut the pieces with a sharp utility knife. The Polystyrene is glued with Acrylic Solvent that welds it together. I use Evergreen StripStyrene for the trim, I used to make my own windows and doors but lately I have been buying them on line. When the building is finished I spray a primer on so I can paint it with Acrylic Paints. This building I used Rust-oleum  multicolor textured spray paint , Desert Bisque and it gave the building a nice stucco look. The tile roof was bought  on line. The foundation and steps are made from Precision Board. This building is a replica of a late 1800's NRA riffle association riffle range club house.

 

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@corsair29 posted:

This was made with parts from 2 plasticville hospitals and an airport. The dock on the back was mostly scratch built.

24ACdock

Love this Steve, looks like a fun project.

I gotta see what is in my large Plasticville part stash and see what I can create. The last time I did this I created a two story urban street building - ground floor stores and apartments above. I posted pics of this several months ago

Guys, my hats off to each of you as you are all great modelers with so much talent.  I'm certain there are others equally as talented on the forum who are either to shy to share or need a bit of motivation to go and take a few pictures of their work. 

Unfortunately, I don't have anything to share in O gauge that are scratch built by me.   I like to buy derelict scratch buildings and and O scale handmade railcars that need work and repair them for use.  But I've got much of it packed away.  

What I'd like to learn is how some of you approach making doors and windows with the appropriate frames and molding around them.  This seems to me to be the trickiest parts to tackle.

@Allegheny posted:

Guys, my hats off to each of you as you are all great modelers with so much talent.  I'm certain there are others equally as talented on the forum who are either to shy to share or need a bit of motivation to go and take a few pictures of their work. 

Unfortunately, I don't have anything to share in O gauge that are scratch built by me.   I like to buy derelict scratch buildings and and O scale handmade railcars that need work and repair them for use.  But I've got much of it packed away.  

What I'd like to learn is how some of you approach making doors and windows with the appropriate frames and molding around them.  This seems to me to be the trickiest parts to tackle.

Hi Allegheny

Almost all of my windows are constructed from Evergreen StripStyrene and a little ingenuity. Evergreen has all kinds of different pieces and they match lumber in real life so you can copy almost any window or door if you have the patience. They don't always have to be perfect, a good copy works  and some good modeling tools help a lot. The 2 blue photos are store bought, you can modify them to suit your needs. I don't have any step by step photos of how I built my windows but here are some finished ones.

 

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Some fantastic looking creations here. Very nice!

I haven't done a LOT of structure kit bashing, but when I was doing so, I used to enjoy taking an inexpensive (at the time) kit, and turning into something in keeping with my modeled locale and time frame.

Along that vein, "back then" I took this .99 cent kit:

AHM_Farmhouse

And turned it into a typical Ozark dwelling that one could find in the 1960s in the Ozarks:

house4

So, the above .99 cent project was not nearly as involved as some of the other projects in this thread, but it was a fun excursion to me at the time. I'm not currently in the "structure" phase of my layout (back drop boards, sealing/painting of same and lighting is next)... so the above Ozark dwelling is patiently waiting to be re-used on my current Ozark theme layout.

Andre

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@Jerrman posted:

Here’s a few of the scratch builds I’ve done. The drive-in entry is from a still existing prototype structure outside of Portland Or., the tenement building is (I think) from a design by Walthers in HO scale, the burlesque building is from an HO design by Foscale Limited, the garage is just my own design. 

I won'r repost the photos but those are all terrific!!

@Bob posted:

"Is this entire structure set out some distance from the backdrop, or is this something you added in Photoshop?"

Will, all of the city structures sit away from the backdrop.  In fact, an elevated track runs behind them.

 

Love the way you used the space Bob. I very clever layout plan and treatment of the city. I often find just putting flats against the wall to be unconvincing. I assume things are somewhat removable so you can get to the hidden track if necessary?

This was a sound car crate cover for an H²O mini bluetooth speaker I made of popsicle sticks so"anything" could have a whistle.IMG_20190508_101341

Im really not too into sounds and was recalling all the small shack pastie shops I used to see in the UP of Michigan and other northern places as a kid.

I upgraded to tounge depressor craft sticks for making signs 

 IMG_20200512_215542~3

Then I started a small coach or màybe drover car... but this formed insteadIMG_20200522_233316~2IMG_20200526_12071720200604_033720~3

The realization I really didn't have room for large items promted a small sales stand like I used to see from North to South at roadsides and homes alike.IMG_20190518_043911~3

In February I couldn't get "Dusk till Dawn" imagery out of head. And loosly recreated the building, but not before researching the the story premise more and finding out it is based on Myan religion and their "bible stories".

  Turns out it is related to a level of their underworld where (one of many named) "Hunapu", a hero of sorts, looses his head to bat demons.  What was freaky is I couldn't shake the image until covid hit hard... and it seems bats are the origin of that... Psychic or psychotic or coincidence, it's spooky imo.😱sketch-1594412647211

It fits in an 0-27 curve, and is just foam from packages.   

Racing the sunset to seal it off before the vampire virus can spread.

IMG_20200601_010212~4

                                                                                   Wagon train ↑↑↑↑↑ 😁

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I have a mountain that has two track in and three out.  When I had a full background on one end of the layout I added a fourth track out of the mountain to a hidden track.  The other end came out of a hole in the background that needed disguising. 

Addition Traint 9-26-2016 2016-09-24 089

 

The hole in the background is hidden by an industrial building.  This building was made from 1/8 inch Masonite with brick paper covering the sides. The main outside loop track goes through this building too.   Arch top windows were added and made from plastic sheeting and panes from 1/16 inch auto pin stripping.  Vent stacks were added to the roof.  A fake roll up door was added to the open ends of the building from wood dowels.  A section of flat building was made as the building and installed against the background to give the appearance of a larger building.

  Train addition 9-5-2016 2016-09-04 008

Train addition 9-5-2016 2016-09-04 010

 

Train addition 9-5-2016 2016-09-04 011

 

Three sections of the hidden track, located at each end and in the middle of hidden track, have isolated outside rails to trigger a track occupation signal to indicate if a train is present on the track since the track cannot be seen.  The signal power is controlled by the round house light switch.  The signal is mounted on the left end of the industrial building, in full view of the engineer.  12 volt mini Radio Shack bulbs of red, yellow and green are used for the signal.  Each bulb represents a section of hidden track that is occupied, and all three “on” mean the track has a long train hidden.  The lights also indicate the progress of a train moving on the hidden track.

Train addition 9-5-2016 2016-09-04 026

 

Picture of Industrial building behind the round house.

Train Complete 1-17-2015 116

Charlie

4.5x9tinTrainStoreDepotLady

The AF talking city station w/ station stop and record player still alive inside but with more blue collars than previous eras and the tiny switch tower are favs.JokerDepotIMG_20180911_151457~2

HVAC is a Tyco whistle billboard. the rest is pipes, pinstripe, floral wire, inner tube, matchsticks, and a retro style box of Cracker Jack. Home made tell tales w/cotter pin fingers.

switchtowerIMG_20181122_211954~2

The worst bridge ever, sw. tower leg is on the left, Pure spur of the moment rookie expementation with foam. I thought about concrete footing, but went another direction on a whim. It has a emery cloth roadbed draped over a few kabob sized dowls and jammed into foam. Still not bad enough to bother to pull off mine. This cross view is seldom seen.IMG_20190404_012841~3VladsYard

Ball is a lightweight wood knob, base brass, tack vent- drilled, staple/pin bead handles and pinstripe lid seam trim. Glued now but was actually pretty stable. The house for this yard is an over scale cardboard craft store item, just brown paper look... not here... next time. 

The roof, box lid, are wood. I of course added the Flag, flag light sconce(laser pointer lens cap, inverted) It's wired from roof to pole, then back down at a Guywire angle into a hole in the ground to go under the rails vs over them. It's also in the far corner obscured by a pulp paper 0-31 tunnel and El. line. Dusting is a huge job. Hard to get there and leave it all standing and clearanced ok.

whistleShackClosed

#$&! kids playing at the tracks... They knocked my shrubbery over again.

Ni 😁

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Last edited by Adriatic
@Adriatic posted:

@JohnnieWalker The glass depot is a spectical of home engine-u-ity. "Tight"  

After the little glass dome noddle shack, I'm itching to build with more glass for structure vs window/door/ice/water/etc.. Inspiring 😁

This is a great place to get ideas from .  Here is yet another glass ( kitchen island light ) standard gauge station I built  a few years ago .  I sold it to a good buddy of mine after I realized it was way too BIG for anything I could use .  My standard gauge layouts are all floor layouts that are set up once or twice a year for now . IMG_1580IMG_1581IMG_1582IMG_1586IMG_1588IMG_1592IMG_1600IMG_1601

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Here’s a few more scratch/kit bashed structures I’ve done. Mom’s diner (motto: “get it yourself”), is kitbashed from a plastruct diner kit, cut in half to shorten and add various details, the Green Dragon Chinese restaurant is from a Foscale HO design and Per-Don Tobacco and the Front Street Mission are scratch built, roughly from building designs on George Sellios’ F&SM HO scale layout.  

 

d

 

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Last edited by Jerrman
@Jerrman posted:

Thanks, Ray. Have always used George’s modeling as my guide as I love the rundown other side of the tracks aesthetic. I’ve watched videos of the F&SM, studied the blogs which feature F&SM pix and have seen the layout in person. I never tire of it. 

 That is excellent work Jerman'.. I love all of it and one can see an influence of  George's master pieces.  I would love to see more of your very nice modeling'....😀👍

Thank you, Ted. The comment is much appreciated. Any (likely undeserved) comparison to George’s work makes my day. I don’t want to hijack this great thread (since except for one, these are kits, not scratch or kitbashed) but, in answer to your request about more of my modeling based on George’s inspiration, here are a few favorites. The garage is Foscale, the barn is Laser-Art (I literally set it on fire to get the effect), I think the machine shop is Sierrawest, the scrap yard is part of scratch built scene, the water scene structure is Foscale, the skiff is ModelTechStudios.

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@Bob posted:

The old Grandt Line of windows, doors, etc. was bought by San Juan Models and is now San Juan Details.  Here is their door page:

https://sanjuandetails.com/arc...oors/building-doors/

Tichy Train Group also sells O-scale windows, doors, etc.  Here's their door page:

https://www.tichytraingroup.co...o_doors/Default.aspx

 

 

Thanks, Bob. Grandt Line and Tichy  are terrific, especially for older structures, but I am thinking of a site that had more contemporary doors. Maybe I just imagined it and am losing my marbles?

Last edited by Will

What a collection of great buildings and great talent! It's why it's so fun to continue to post in the OGRR Forum. Here's the scratch-built structures on my railroad. Most are in the Victorian end of the spectrum. 

1. Woodbourne Gallery; From my drawings, laser cut and 3D Printed parts, plus lots of other stuff. Based closely on an extant building, the Bronx Documentary Center in Bronx, NYC. Reduced height by one floor and length by about 15 scale feet so it would fit my village.

WG in Place 4

2. Nighthawks Cafe: Basic building from plans in 1957 Model Railroader Magazine, and then modified to contain Edward Hopper's "Nighthawks" masterpiece in the interior. All scratch-built with Plastruct brick paper. Turret turned on lathe. 

45 NH Complete 2

3. I.W. Berheim Bourbon Distillery: Laser cut from my drawings, plus lots of scratch-building. Based on a single photograph of this Victorian-age factory that resides on the wall of the waiting room of the modern Bernheim facility in Louisville, KY owned by Heaven Hill Brands. The real building was built in 1870 and razed during Prohibition.

Bernheim Final 3

4. Woodbourne Substation: scratch-built multi-media project including styrene, soldered brass, turned aluminum plus auto-body fasteners (as insulator sheds). Only kit was the Brennan chain link fence. Transformer is freelanced based on MTH transformer load (didn't use MTH, scratch-build new box). Remainder was from ABB high voltage equipment plans.

Substation in Site 01

5. Woodbourne Station: HO plans appeared in Kalmbach Buildings and Structures book. Constructed from my drawings entirely from styrene. Prototypes still exist on New York, Ontario & Western RR, although not used as train stations any longer.

Levin VIc Station 2

6. Sinclair Refinery: Plastruct Petro-chemical plant kit with added scratch-built (although the entire kit is actually scratch building) Marley Cooling Tower, Flare Tower with knock out drum, and Ops building. Entire site had to be redesigned from Plastruct layout to fit side. Load out stations were detailed up too.

Refinery Reverse View 1

7. Pennsylvania & Pacific RR Engine House: Freelance design drawn by me with laser cut walls, 3D printed accessories and multi-media overhead gantry crane. Building is 3 track spaced to Ross #4 ladder switches and is 40" L X 15" W X 15"H.

EH Beauty Shot

8. P&P RR Machine Shop: Attached to the engine house is a machine shop with a passel of 3D 1:48 machine tools. Some are downloaded drawings from SketchUp Warehouse, others are hand drawn by me (Niles Wheel Lathe, Sterling Radial Drill and Bullard Turret Lathe), but all required substantial editing to make printable.

EH Machine Shop Int 2 Canon

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Hard to follow Trainman with anything!!  His stuff is over the top, 3D printed, greatness.

This was my first serious build, over 30 years ago, for a huge attic layout.  It now resides on my current table layout.

20200716_103335

This is my last build.  The 6 game machines are 3D printed in gray plastic by a guy in Winsted, CT.  The details are photos and paint.  Sizing  and cutting all the cabinet art took some time.

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This Nathans was made out of the tunnel insert from the brewery behind it.

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Figuring out the proper angle of that hip roof was a doozy.

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The Lionel model of the Irvington factory, was much too large.  This modified version has the Miller Engineering roof and window signs, but the window sign is on the left, out of sight of the camera.

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The mall, like many others, was inspired by OGR posts.  The shops are lit from above, and also from cutouts of the foam behind them.

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The theater covers a large speaker box that opens into the rec room.  You can see the large wires going to it.

20180201_130920

This little scene models my basement rec room, with the large bar, pool table, stools, and game machines.  Those are actual mini-arcade games, fully licensed, completely playable, with original sounds and graphics.  They're out of scale of course, but the marquees light up and they look great.

20200519_074241

Years ago, I needed a station to support the trolley line above.  Given the dimensions, all I could do was cobble together scrap materials, including a large bathroom tile for the floor.  Although completely crude, it has grown on me.  Haha.

20200716_103913

There are many more, but these are some of my favorites.

Jerry

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Lots of great work on this thread!

I've posted many of these photos before, but I thought some here haven't seen them, both were scratch built with styrene and wood, both have completed detailed interiors and lighting as well:

Both my water tanks, the log cabin in the back corner, the largest of my three depots, the farmhouse and the two-story wood barrel component factory were scratchbuilt as well, thought none have interior details like the recent structures do...

Last edited by p51

JerryG, Trainman2001, jerryman, and others

What great work by all.  I am just awed.  Makes me hesitant about post my 50s style efforts.

  Yes ,I would say kits are welcomed as the skill and results are ever bit as good as many kitbashed or scratch buildings, better than any of mine for sure!

Keep sharing.  I am holding a couple of my small 50s style efforts for when the topic runs out of steam and needs to get back in circulation.

Charlie

@Jerrman posted:

Thank you, Ted. The comment is much appreciated. Any (likely undeserved) comparison to George’s work makes my day. I don’t want to hijack this great thread (since except for one, these are kits, not scratch or kitbashed) but, in answer to your request about more of my modeling based on George’s inspiration, here are a few favorites. The garage is Foscale, the barn is Laser-Art (I literally set it on fire to get the effect), I think the machine shop is Sierrawest, the scrap yard is part of scratch built scene, the water scene structure is Foscale, the skiff is ModelTechStudios.

 Jerman', A kit is only as good as what the modeler can do with it.  Everyone of your examples is a perfect blending of excellent modeling craftsmanship'.. An absolutely fabulous job. Impressions of George or not, these models have your touch and are quite distinguishable from any other modeler'...

Thanks for posting these beautiful models'....

I have only 3 or 4 kits on my layout. At least 50 + scratch built structures.  I really enjoy scratch building and is a very big part of the hobby for me.  I'm posting the ones I think you, as viewers will  enjoy seeing.... I must congratulate the many excellent builders and bashers that are posting.  Your work is excellent, and wonderful to see O scale structures at their finest'...👍🏻😀⭐

 

sta1bw

 

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Last edited by Quarter Gauger 48
@ToledoEd posted:

Steve24944, the coal elevator is such a clever idea. I just installed a 97 Coal elevator. Your model is an inspiration. Quarter Gauger 48 has encouraged me to build and this is a great subject. Hope you don’t mind I copy your concept.  

Go for it,  I got my idea for the 97 from some post I had found when I did a search on the internet some years ago.   Post some pictures when you do your project.

Steve

P7175041

In the top one, I wanted to get some real height to my city area. Except for the REA building on the left, the other ones are all about an inch thick.  The two apartment buildings are attached to the rear of the green building and are just carved out of pine boards.  The windows are Lionel.  They are from accessories and were very cheap to buy, even in large volume ( a necessity ).  The line of laundry just seemed like the thing to do.

In the one on the right , below, I wanted to do some stone structures. I made a mold  (really just a box) , poured plaster in it and added real stones.  Some grey paint mixed in with the plaster.  The other 3 walls are just thin plywood. (the sign says  "Buddy's Place.  Jazz nightly."  after the famous drummer Buddy Rich )

The Lionel Trains sign on top of the Madison Hardware came from Miller Engineering and flashes.  I love lights so the Miller Engineering products are a favorite - I have about 8 or them.

The left most, derelict building is carved from pine board.  The Wet Paint sign was thinned out and worked into the crevices in the Sellios manner.

 

P7175044

 

 

Like alot of people, I was fascinated by the 1949 Lionel Showroom layout as the photos appeared in the Lionel paperback books Model Railroading published by Bantam in the 50s and 60s.

One of my favorites was the Swifty Meat Packing Co on a sweeping curve in the corner of the layout. I believe it was based on a building by Frank Ellison on the Delta Lines.  The book conveniently provided all the dimensions, so building my own copy was a pretty reasonable task (page 214 of the 6th edition, for example).   Except for the windows, it is all scratch built.Swifty Meat Packing Co

John

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Last edited by CPF3

I've started a new build, really don't know how I'm going to do it so just feeling my way along.

The pic with cardboard is for a mock-up, give me an idea of overall footprint.  Other pics of the little progress I've made so far.  Building is a mix of foamboard, leftover Ameri-Town fascades, joint compound and bass wood.

More to come, can't promise anything good.

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Ozarka, Arkansas. Autumn, 1964...

KC&G GP7 #412 idles it's EMD chant beside Ozarka's engine house while the crew's shootin' the bull with the engine house Foreman: Ol' Jess.

Braggin' rights are at stake, for they're right in the midst of seeing who bagged the most squirrels on yesterday's opening day of squirrel season. Meanwhile, a KC&G ALCo (RS-3 #269) slumbers silently in the engine house for Ol' Jess to renew going over it for the mandated service inspection.

This is the calm before the storm, for it won't be long and the northbound coal train they're waiting on will hit town, which is precisely what #412's crew is waiting on. When it does, they'll tack on to the caboose, and once the highball comes from the head end, with a cacophonous uproar, the entire entourage will gather up what run they can muster, and another battle up The Mountain will begin.

Life moves at a different pace on the KC&G up in the mountains of the Arkansas Ozarks.

031620b

What you're seeing...

Just messing around and was tired of the "engines service" area just being empty tracks. SO, in about 45 minutes start to finish, I "scratchbuilt" the above sheet iron engine house. Later I came back and placed the various service items I had on hand.

The scene (the entire layout) has a long ways to go before it's anywhere near complete... but it's fun getting there.

Andre

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Last edited by laming

This was my first kitbash.  3 MTH Banks.  Certainly not an original idea.  I have very few of those.  My family calls me the king of cut and paste for my lack of originality. 

Two banks I purchased used and very cheap, so  I had no trouble cutting them up.  I could not find a third on the used market for the longest time, so I purchased a new one.  

I sat at the workbench for the longest time with the saw in my hand debating on whether or not I should hack up a brand new model.

IMG_20200718_103312722IMG_20200718_103259618IMG_20200718_103232263IMG_20200718_103214786IMG_20200718_103203065

I did not realize until I attached the pictures, but you get a bonus homemade of Sal's Italian Hot Dog Trailer.  

Have Fun!

Ron

 

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@laming posted:
<snip>

031620b

<snip>

"SO, in about 45 minutes start to finish, I 'scratchbuilt' the above sheet iron engine house."

<snip>

A word of explanation about that 45 minutes part for concern for y'all that could be thinkin' I'm BS'n 'ya:

The above engine house started a photo that I had long ago manipulated via photo software for use on "V scale" (computer simulation) engine house I created for a route (V scale parlance for a "layout") that I was creating. So, it was a simple matter to resize the photo to HO scale, print it out, glue it to some poster board and cut and assemble! Right at 45 minutes from start to finish! It's only a "stand in" until a more detailed styrene structure can replace it... but it "good enuf" for me that it might be there for a long time!

Andre

Last edited by laming

Great thread... I love to scratch.    On my Hi-rail layout I try to design my buildings with some realism but also adorn them to resemble the toy like appearance of my rolling stock. Sometimes it works better than others times. I have included some pics to show how the building fits into the scenery. Here are my two train stations. DSCN0432DSCN0433DSCN0438DSCN0437DSCN0436DSCN0458DSCN0457DSCN0456DSCN0455DSCN0238DSCN0239DSCN0240DSCN0259DSCN0036DSCN0003

 

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Last edited by jackiejr

 

Great jobs by all.  I really liked that scratch church made from a Model Builder magazine picture made by dkdkrd and the restyled Lionel 97 coal loading tower by steve 24944 just to note a few recent ones and they all are super.  What talent and craftsmanship we have here on OGR forum.

Here is a smaller coaling tower project, a restyled kitbashed Bachmann Coaling Station built years ago in the 1980's.  I did not have room by my round table for a Lionel model 97.

The Bachmann Coal Station, number 1975, is a good kitbashing kit. 

IMG_0127

 

My first kit-bash was to make a raised roof, (which had a conveyor to spread coal), on the the Coal Station to replace the 1975 flat roof.  I always liked the looks of that style coal station.  I used 1/8 inch tempered Masonite with one smooth side.  The smooth sides were scored with a knife to look like siding.  Windows were cut out and made and installed in the top section.  The parts were glued with Elmer's glue.  A sheet metal roof, obtained at a train show, was installed.

 

Finished Coaling Station

IMG_0039

 

 View of the under side of the new roof.

IMG_0031

 

 Some day I may add a coal loading system to this Coaling Station similar to the loading system in my kitbashed Coal Mine (to be seen in a later post) made from the Bachmann Coaling Station kit too.

Charlie

Last edited by Choo Choo Charlie

I started with two of these:

c66b6f3728d41acc2c013cf48017ce088a2039f0

Now I have this:

IMG_7597

I bought 16 of these:

IMG_6618