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Making progress on my bench work and top, now time to build my wooden lift bridge, wide enough for 3 tracks spanning 30”.  I haven’t found a good you tube on cutting track, although the lift bridge for the polar express layout is very helpful. I practiced cuts to the rails and road bed and it worked fine, my issues is with the end clearance on the hinge end using the euro hinges, I’m now going to use strap or small square hinges raised on blocks, I saw one OGR member bend the strap hinge on an angle, did anyone else see that, can’t find it on line.

any suggestions from previous post would be helpful.  Tom Timage

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@Tzer58 posted:

Making progress on my bench work and top, now time to build my wooden lift bridge, wide enough for 3 tracks spanning 30”.  I haven’t found a good you tube on cutting track, although the lift bridge for the polar express layout is very helpful. I practiced cuts to the rails and road bed and it worked fine, my issues is with the end clearance on the hinge end using the euro hinges, I’m now going to use strap or small square hinges raised on blocks, I saw one OGR member bend the strap hinge on an angle, did anyone else see that, can’t find it on line.

Are you talking about these pictures?

20220803_16361420220928_17500520220928_175014

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Strap hinges with a 3/4" block under them to raise the hinge pin above the rail height worked well for me.  You'll need to bevel the free end of the bridge for clearance when closing.

Thanks to @gunrunnerjohn for his great example and picture.

And the key that holds true in most of the fold up bridge designs is- placing the hinge pin line above the track. This allows straight cuts in the track without worrying of binding when raising the bridge. How the rest of the hinge below the table surface is bent really doesn't matter, the magic part is having the fulcrum just above the rail top surface.

Sorry, but this method here I don't think works out well. You are still swinging that back edge of the track on top of the table in a way I don't think can mate up. Again if the track joint was at the edge of the "bridge", it's then hitting the table track that is still there also to the same parting line.

Maybe you can prove me wrong with something I'm not seeing. I think you used the wrong hinge and wrong placement.

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Last edited by Vernon Barry

I think that might be made to work by angle cutting the track at the other end.  We built the bridge first, laid the track, and then just cut the track on either end with a Dremel.

Another greater issue with this design is the proper registration of the bridge when it's closed.  Mine has brass locating pins that leave no doubt that the tracks will be aligned when it's down.

Also, I want to praise the craftsmanship of that example of a bridge. Very impressive. I think I see the other trick.

The fascia wooden panel is also angled. That is what prevents interference.

You'll need to bevel the free end of the bridge for clearance when closing.

And that is what that comment is partially about. I think it partially meant the rail cuts but could also impact "the bridge" if there is thickness or side panels.

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Also, I want to praise the craftsmanship of that example of a bridge. Very impressive. I think I see the other trick.

The fascia wooden panel is also angled. That is what prevents interference.



And that is what that comment is partially about. I think it partially meant the rail cuts but could also impact "the bridge" if there is thickness or side panels.

Yes, there is an angle, and I can open the bridge without it hitting!

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