How about Lionel themed time pieces?  They marketed wall and desk clocks along with wrist and pocket watches.  I have some of all of these.  This one hangs in my den where I do train repairs.  The train on the perimeter goes around each hour accompanied by various train themed sound effects. 

Rolland

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RLaHaie posted:

How about Lionel themed time pieces?  They marketed wall and desk clocks along with wrist and pocket watches.  I have some of all of these.  This one hangs in my den where I do train repairs.  The train on the perimeter goes around each hour accompanied by various train themed sound effects. 

Rolland

Rolland, I have seen people rave about those Lionel clocks on other forums. The train that travels around once an hour rarely works now, but the clocks that work still keep accurate time.

 

Lionel 78 RPM Flexi-Disc from 1949
78 RPM Clear Vinyl Flexi-Disc in Unfolded Sleeve from 1949
Lionel Video Series Volume 1
Lionel Video Series Volume One - VHS
2014 LRRC Membership Card

2014 LRRC Membership Card - Front

(Last one issued before merging with L.C.C.A.)

2014 LRRC Membership Card - Back

2014 LRRC Membership Card - Back

(It's unknown whether a button was issued also.)

LRRC Embroidered Patch

LRRC Embroidered Patch

(This was sent to members from 1976-1981.)

Kids Club Pinback Button

1998 Kids Club Pinback Button

(Only 2 were issued.  This was #2.)

"Double Crossing" - The Lionel Train Game
LRRC Keep on Trackin' #1

Lionel Railroader Club Keep on Trackin' Issue No. 1

(This publication changed names a few times and lasted for 145 issues.)

 

Instructional Video Disk

Instructional Digital Video Disk

(These came with Lionel train sets.)

Gold Century Club Member card

 Lionel Century Club Gold Century Club Member card

(There was also a regular member card that was silvery gray.)

 

 

tripleo posted:

If you want to prepare a hot snack while playing with your train, Lionel had just what you needed. I doubt this would be accepted in this day and age - too dangerous for little kids, ya know.

https://www.morphyauctions.com...julia/item/3458-364/

"...two working burners and an oven..."

That's to keep your daughter too busy to play with your trains.

In 1930 Lionel offered a realistic stove for girls. Standing about 34 inches tall, the stove featured a working oven with built-in thermometer, two functioning electric burners, and a clean porcelain finish. Lionel’s oven bore an amazing likeness to a real kitchen stove, constructed, Lionel advertised, “as substantially as the one Mother uses.” Such a well-made toy, however, came at a cost. And therein lies the stove’s demise: Lionel introduced its authentic-in-every-detail stove in the year after the U.S. economy tanked, signaling the start of the Great Depression. According to Ron Hollander’s All Aboard! The Story of Joshua Lionel Cowen and His Lionel Train Company (2000), the toy stove, at $29.50, cost as much as Mom’s gas stove. Purchasing the toy stove commanded more than a public school teacher made in a week in the 1930s. At a time when Americans faced 25 percent unemployment, few could afford such a toy. 

Good post, Leo. I had never heard about this one.

Vincent Massi posted:

Found another folder with more photos6-14091_gatemanhyjpw-5020170320-135344-C1-Trainz-3990656-00s-l10001GY0HF14

I would have thought these items would be considered trains.  

If not then you could include a wealth of track, lockons, pins, trestles, switches, buildings, and action accessories as non-train items also.

Vincent Massi posted:
tripleo posted:

If you want to prepare a hot snack while playing with your train, Lionel had just what you needed. I doubt this would be accepted in this day and age - too dangerous for little kids, ya know.

https://www.morphyauctions.com...julia/item/3458-364/

"...two working burners and an oven..."

That's to keep your daughter too busy to play with your trains.

In 1930 Lionel offered a realistic stove for girls. Standing about 34 inches tall, the stove featured a working oven with built-in thermometer, two functioning electric burners, and a clean porcelain finish. Lionel’s oven bore an amazing likeness to a real kitchen stove, constructed, Lionel advertised, “as substantially as the one Mother uses.” Such a well-made toy, however, came at a cost. And therein lies the stove’s demise: Lionel introduced its authentic-in-every-detail stove in the year after the U.S. economy tanked, signaling the start of the Great Depression. According to Ron Hollander’s All Aboard! The Story of Joshua Lionel Cowen and His Lionel Train Company (2000), the toy stove, at $29.50, cost as much as Mom’s gas stove. Purchasing the toy stove commanded more than a public school teacher made in a week in the 1930s. At a time when Americans faced 25 percent unemployment, few could afford such a toy. 

Good post, Leo. I had never heard about this one.

 I saw one of these stoves in a collection. The former owner was in low income housing and had apparently been using it to prepare her meals. This wasn’t a toy so much as it was an inexpensive cooking appliance. 

American by birth. Southern by the grace of God.  

Lionelski posted:

Telegraph key and Geiger Counter

IMG_5702IMG_5704

I've got one of the more simplified telegraph keys I got a yard sale without even realizing it was Lionel until I got it home.

A Boy Scout camp I worked for back in 2009 had a box of about 20 geiger counters.  As I recall about a third were Lionel, a third were GE, and the other third were another company, maybe Westinghouse.  All were of the same design and some had Civil Defense logos and markings.  Had most of the matching dosimeter pens and chargers as well.

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