I have a question regarding the smoke fluid inside the smoke stacks. Is it safe to keep the smoke fluid inside the stacks if you have to pack up your trains and keep it in storage? I mean after about 4 or 5 years you start using them again can the fluid that was left inside dry up and damage the smoke unit in anyway? If so what would be the recommendation if you have to put your trains in storage?

Original Post

I would think not but I would recommend you do not store them upside-down as the fluid will run out to some extent and can get all over the box there stored in n even sometimes get into the electronics! just make sure the engines in there boxes would be upright and should be no issues, some liquid might evaporate in time so you might need to put more drops in before you run them again! I would try and run them before you start adding fluid you might not need to add any fluid!

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A bit off topic, but what about using smoke fluid in post-war locos ?   

Dan Padova

 

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Dan Padova posted:

A bit off topic, but what about using smoke fluid in post-war locos ?   

Smoke fluid works fine in post-war pellet units.  When I was collecting post-war, pellets weren't readily available so I used smoke fluid.  Besides, it didn't leave the white residue around the stack.

Rusty

Alan Mancus posted:

I would think not but I would recommend you do not store them upside-down as the fluid will run out to some extent and can get all over the box there stored in n even sometimes get into the electronics! just make sure the engines in there boxes would be upright and should be no issues, some liquid might evaporate in time so you might need to put more drops in before you run them again! I would try and run them before you start adding fluid you might not need to add any fluid!

I always mark my boxes with a "Top" designations and never store any locomotive with a smoke unit  other than on it's wheels.

Marty

 

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MTH Does recommend you add fluid prior to long storage and add some when you bring it back out.  What I recommend to a lot of people with lionel Locos is to run the last run empty, shut down the loco and and add fluid. Let is soak up for a few minutes before boxing it up. Store it so the stacks are facing up meaning that the loco isn’t upside down

Tim Lewis

 

sahan posted:

Thanks for the tips. How about keeping it in the box nose up?

I wouldn't.  Smoke fluid leaks out of the unit and onto the boards and could be an expensive fix.  Trust me I know.  Wheels down is the only way I store engines with smoke units.

Marty

 

Below the Signature...

"Awesome Treksgiving dinner with Captain Kirk"

 

MartyE posted:
sahan posted:

Thanks for the tips. How about keeping it in the box nose up?

I wouldn't.  Smoke fluid leaks out of the unit and onto the boards and could be an expensive fix.  Trust me I know.  Wheels down is the only way I store engines with smoke units.

Agreed. Plus, even with proper packing, storing a locomotive nose up puts excessive pressure on the rear of the model, possibly damaging or distorting some plastic parts over time.

As for the smoke fluid question, you should add enough to keep the wick moist to prevent it from drying out in storage, but not so much that the fluid will quickly spill out if the model is tilted briefly. MTH and Lionel have both recommended storing them moistened.

However, you could always opt to simply replace the wicking once it is dried out if you prefer the security of not having any smoke fluid present to damage your locomotives.

I prefer to store mine with some smoke fluid in place. 

Jim R. 

Not dumb at all, I've seen smoke fluid soaked boards that were none the worse for wear when cleaned off.  I clean them with 99% Isopropyl Alcohol.  I do know that steady exposure to smoke fluid will harden the insulation on wiring, I see lots of that.  Smoke fluid is non-conductive, and most boards are washed during manufacture, so sealing should be a non-issue.

I have yet to personally see a board that has failed due to exposure to smoke fluid.  I'd also like to know more about what and why this happens.

Most boards today are built with no clean flux.  You will sometimes see a light, white residue on the boards.  Especially if they are using a selective solder machine.   It is much more cost effective.  Repair is done with no clean flux and no clean solder as well.  Washing boards in the past 10-15 yrs has become very problematic.   The equipment, the EPA, and non-wettable parts are all factors in the problem.

The chenistries and solders have come a long way in the past 20 yrs.

In China, who knows what happens.  At the higher end their boards do perform very well, but with constant customer monitoring. 

If smoke fluid is non-conductive and non-reactive then it shouldn't be a problem any more than any other lightweight oil.

gunrunnerjohn posted:

I have yet to personally see a board that has failed due to exposure to smoke fluid.  I'd also like to know more about what and why this happens.

My Big Boy RCMC was a casualty of smoke fluid leaking onto it so I have seen it. Unfortunately. 

Marty

 

Below the Signature...

"Awesome Treksgiving dinner with Captain Kirk"

 

gunrunnerjohn posted:

I guess I have to wonder how sure we are that it was the smoke fluid.  I've had boards really soaked with it, and I just cleaned them off with alcohol and all was well.

I guess as long as you know it's there to clean off your ok.

Marty

 

Below the Signature...

"Awesome Treksgiving dinner with Captain Kirk"

 

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