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Yes, you can connect multiple track feeders from that TMCC lockon.  Lionel uses 18 gauge track feeders which are flexible enough to easily connect to Fastrack terminals.   You can go thicker (16 ga  or 14 ga) but that is more challenging to attach to Fastrack without cutting away some plastic near the terminals.

You might want to consider running a larger wire from the lockon to a terminal strip below your layout and then spread out from there with smaller wire. 

Remember to set your TMCC lockon to 180 W or 135 W position based on the transformer you are using. 

You can run a pair of bus wires out of the lockon, or run the wires out of the lockon to a terminal strip. It makes no difference. One lockon is all that's needed on the entire layout.

I highly recommend 16 or 14 ga wire. Connect track feeders a minimum of every 10 feet of track length. Don't skimp on the wire. It's vital to a reliable layout. Lionel recommends using 14 ga to connect  the powerhouse to the track.

As far as fastrack, if that's what your using. I soldered 14ga feeders right to the power terminals under the track.

Last edited by RickO

Thanks everybody for all the help, it will get me started with first power to some track.  
John, on MTH issue, plan to split the output power line from power source into two separate power systems with a switch to power up either one.  Does this sound like an option?  For now just Legacy power build.

Thanks,

Sent from my iPad

On Jan 29, 2022, at 11:22 AM, O Gauge Railroading <alerts@crowdstack.com> wrote:





Last edited by 60-66
@60-66 posted:

John, on MTH issue, plan to split the output power line from power source into two separate power systems with a switch to power up either one.  Does this sound like an option?  For now just Legacy power build.

Truthfully, I never saw the utility of the TMCC Direct Lockon, so I just eliminated them. The Lionel PH180 brick has an excellent circuit breaker, and I do NOT want the power coming back on until I correct the reason for the trip in the first place. My power runs from the PH180 transformers through the MTH TIU and on to the tracks. I have seamless TMCC/Legacy and DCS operation and I don't have to switch anything.

Truthfully, I never saw the utility of the TMCC Direct Lockon, so I just eliminated them. The Lionel PH180 brick has an excellent circuit breaker, and I do NOT want the power coming back on until I correct the reason for the trip in the first place. My power runs from the PH180 transformers through the MTH TIU and on to the tracks. I have seamless TMCC/Legacy and DCS operation and I don't have to switch anything.

I run strictly TMCC (no conventional, no DCS) and the Direct Lockons are great.  I have a large layout and a derailed train can be 40 feet from the PH180 brick.  With the lockons, just re-rail the car, the power comes back automatically and you're off.  Eliminating the lockons would provide more exercise (40 feet to reset the breaker and 40 feet back to the train) but I go to the gym for that. 

@Bob posted:

Eliminating the lockons would provide more exercise (40 feet to reset the breaker and 40 feet back to the train) but I go to the gym for that. 

I don't have to take a step to reset the transformers on my layout.  I just pull this out of my pocket and push the OFF and then the ON for the affected track, job done and I'm back to running.

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Note that the TMCC Direct Lockon will kill the DCS signal if you're running MTH equipment, something to keep in mind.

I am new to TMCC, and need some education, please.

I recently experimented hooking up TMCC to my layout which already has DCS.  I'm not familiar with the TMCC direct lockon - I hooked the systems up two ways.  One time, I used the MTH cable to connect the base to the TIU while connecting the base to the same transformer post that powers the outside rails; with this configuration I could run MTH and Lionel engines via the DCS remote - ran them simultaneously in opposite directions on the same track.  Another time, I connected the TMCC base directly to the outside rails with no connection to the TIU.  I was able to run the Lionel engine with the Cab1-L remote and the MTH engine with the DCS remote.  The engines ran simultaneously on the same track in opposite directions, so it doesn't seem like I harmed the DCS signal.

My layout is small and simple enough that I'm OK with using the Cab1-L to control the Lionel engines, so it seems like it's simpler to keep TMCC and DCS separate from each other.  Am I tempting fate (or fried electronics) by having both hooked up independently at the same time? 

@A. Wells posted:

It always trips before my PH180 and I also like that it resets automatically.

That's what I was looking for -- when they're connected as the Lionel directions indicate which is the one that trips first.

I have several, not yet installed, and I intend to use them with PH135's.

It looks like I may need to invest in a choke for each one however, just to make sure that my DCS signal doesn't get hammered.

Thanks!

Mike

So I run Legacy and TMCC locomotives using an MRC Pure Power Dual power source.  Does the MRC provide adequate protection of electronics in the event of a derailment/short or should I be considering the TMCC lockon to trip faster than the MRC?  Haven’t had any issues in the several years I’ve been running.

Rick

@Rixster posted:

So I run Legacy and TMCC locomotives using an MRC Pure Power Dual power source.  Does the MRC provide adequate protection of electronics in the event of a derailment/short or should I be considering the TMCC lockon to trip faster than the MRC?  Haven’t had any issues in the several years I’ve been running.

Rick

Rick,

They're made to be used with a fixed AC voltage source so they won't help you, but there are alternatives for variable sources.

One popular one is the AirPax instantaneous circuit breaker.

I'd give you better details but I currently posting from my phone.

Go to the forum's search function at the top of the page and type in AirPax.  There are already several threads going that will get you the details.

Mike

Rick,

They're made to be used with a fixed AC voltage source so they won't help you, but there are alternatives for variable sources.

One popular one is the AirPax instantaneous circuit breaker.

I'd give you better details but I currently posting from my phone.

Go to the forum's search function at the top of the page and type in AirPax.  There are already several threads going that will get you the details.

Mike

Mike - Are you referring to the PSX (PSX-AC, PSX-1)circuit breakers? Anthony (https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...25#80973530478371325)

Last edited by A. Wells

No,

PSX's are top notch electronic breakers but they also require a fixed voltage.  If I recall correctly it's 10 VAC or higher.

The AirPax are traditional breakers, and so can be used at any voltage within their voltage range.  However they're magnetically operated, rather than thermally like most traditional non-electronic breakers, so they're very fast like the electronic ones.

Actually there's another option too. Lionel Postwar Model 98 breakers are also magnetic. If you can find them they make a good alternative to AirPax.  They also have an adjustable current trip point, unlike AirPax, which are fixed.

Mike

Last edited by Mellow Hudson Mike
@A. Wells posted:

Mike - Are you referring to the PSX (PSX-AC, PSX-1)circuit breakers? Anthony (https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...25#80973530478371325)



The PSX-AC series breakers are very good too especially for command control only applications.  Another excellent and less expensive option for command and conventional operations are the AirPax breakers Mike was referring to... Here's a link to the AirPax Instant breakers informational thread.

Rick,

They're made to be used with a fixed AC voltage source so they won't help you, but there are alternatives for variable sources.

One popular one is the AirPax instantaneous circuit breaker.

I'd give you better details but I currently posting from my phone.

Go to the forum's search function at the top of the page and type in AirPax.  There are already several threads going that will get you the details.

Mike

EDIT: Mike beat me to it.   And I think his edit is referring to the Lionel #91 breaker.

Last edited by SteveH

Gunrunner John is much more knowledgeable than me, but regarding the Lionel Direct Lock-on "killing a MTH DCS signal" that passes through it ...

I connected the output of a MTH Z1000 to a Lionel Direct Lock-on and then route the flow of track power to a MTH DCS Remote Commander device attached to the track of my layout. Although the MTH DCS Remote Commander (the cheapest form of DCS) is a bit slower to respond to commands from its accompanying hand-held controller (compared to Lionel's TMCC with a CAB-1), it works with my (only) MTH loco -- a MTH Aerotrain.

I'm expecting delivery of a just-purchased MTH Alco DL109 loco with PS-2.  When it arrives, I'll test it on the layout to see if it responds to the MTH DCS Remote Commander. I hope so.

Mike Mottler    LCCA 12394

I connected the output of a MTH Z1000 to a Lionel Direct Lock-on and then route the flow of track power to a MTH DCS Remote Commander device ...

You can connect them before the TIU on the input side, then they won't affect the DCS signal.  They'll still operate there.

As John said, if the Lionel Direct Lock-on is on the input side of the DCS signal generator (Remote Commander or TIU), then there should be no problem.

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