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The responses to this topic have offered many great options.  After some investigation and suggestions from forum members, I ended up using a product mostly described as "Foamies." The product is basically a sheet of colored foam.  The product is available in numerous colors, but I  went with black.  The product accepts a flat acrylic "pavement" color paint well.  For stripping, I decided to use 1/8" auto pinstriping.

I approached the thickness choice in two ways.  For North Main Street lined with MTH buildings, I used a 5mm with a 3mm over it to bring up the height of the road to bring the building curbing more in scale.  For South Main Street at the opposite end of the table, I used 3mm for the road, and placed the Woodland Scenics structures on a 6mm "Foamie" sheet (12" x 12") to create the curbing effect.  I painted the 6mm sheets a concrete gray...looks great bordering the flat black roads.  The 5mm sheets l bought came in a 12" x 18" sheet;  the 3mm sheets in 12" x 18"; and the 6mm sheets in 12" x 12."

I'll post pics of the new South Main Street area located below the mountain range, with two rivers running into Spring Lake, as soon as the finishing touches on the area are complete.  The lake area may bring some likes  Here are the North Main Street pics first.  Hope you all had an enjoyable summer...

 

City 27City 42City 62Dealer 11

 

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Last edited by Capetrainman

Quite a while ago someone recommended a product called ice and water.  It is an underlayment material used in the construction industry.  It comes in rolls about 3 feet by about 40 feet it was about 1/8 inch thick.   I was able to get a partially used roll at a lumber yard for no cost,  It has a very fine gravel surface and a tape on the back which sticks to the table.  It is easy to cut with a razor knife and does not require a lot of seems.  I put lines on with a yellow paint marker.

Marty

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Ted

Nice ideas here, the cork looks good as well as the others, in life all roads look a different depending on how old they are, what part of the country and what material was used to make them.

Your scenes are always well done.

Marty, I remember that now, were used to prevent ice buildup and leaks, your roads do look great.

Last edited by sidehack

The responses to this topic have offered many great options.  After some investigation and suggestions from forum members, I ended up using a product mostly described as "Foamies." The product is basically a sheet of colored foam.  The product is available in numerous colors, but I  went with black.  The product accepts a flat acrylic "pavement" color paint well.  For stripping, I decided to use 1/8" auto pinstriping.

I approached the thickness choice in two ways.  For North Main Street lined with MTH buildings, I used a 5mm with a 3mm over it to bring up the height of the road to bring the building curbing more in scale.  For South Main Street at the opposite end of the table, I used 3mm for the road, and placed the Woodland Scenics structures on a 6mm "Foamie" sheet (12" x 12") to create the curbing effect.  I painted the 6mm sheets a concrete gray...looks great bordering the flat black roads.  The 5mm sheets l bought came in a 12" x 18" sheet;  the 3mm sheets in 12" x 18"; and the 6mm sheets in 12" x 12."

I'll post pics of the new South Main Street area located below the mountain range, with two rivers running into Spring Lake, as soon as the finishing touches on the area are complete.  The lake area may bring some likes  Here are the North Main Street pics first.  Hope you all had an enjoyable summer...

 

City 27City 42City 62Dealer 11

 

Paul, your roads look great too... nice and neat'... Plus you have a very well placed assortment of vehicles...!!

My roads are made from three layers

1)  .040 Styrene sheet, cut to the shape of the road.  (I use cardboard to make templates)

2)  1/16" thick black foam craft material. Available in 9 x 12 sheets from Craft Store or Amazon

3)  Durhams Water Putty, tinted with black craft paint.

Glue the foam to the styrene with 3M 77 or other contact cement. Apply the Durhams on top of the foam.  Trowel smooth with a toungue depresser.  When it is just about set, trowel a slight crown in the road

Add lines with Automotive Pinstripe tape

Weather to taste

I realize this approach involves more steps than most,  But it does have some advantages

a)  To my eye it looks very realistic

b)  The road is easily made to follow any curve, and it can easily follow any change in elevation

c) The Durhams is extremely durable:  Easy to vacuum, shows no tire marks, impossible to scuff, can even withstand a dropped tool, car, etc

d) When you lay down the road, it will bend. This causes cracks.  They will look quite real.  Because they are.  Even if the Durhams cracks, it stays bonded to the foam base.  But as a bonus, you can chip the Durhams away at the cracks, revealing the underlying black foam which looks just like a tar repair:

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Last edited by John Sethian

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