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Many build their bench work and layouts in such a way as to deaden or lessen the sound. I can understand that if it's necessary so as not to disturb others, such as a hobbyist who lives in an apartment building or other multiple unit dwelling.

My preference is not to minimize, but instead maximize, the sounds and loudness of the trains I run with one exception.

Why?

In my experience, real trains, especially locomotives, are breathtakingly loud. I like that aspect of realism for all my O Gauge trains.

The only exception: I run quiet trains when my wife is asleep. Unlike me, she sleeps very well and has never had insomnia.

I often wake up in the middle of the night. When I do, I often like to go downstairs and run quiet trains, typically a Williams diesel or early Pre-Protosounds MTH engines, so as not to disturb my wife's sleep. After maybe 15 to 30 minutes of quiet train running, I usually return to bed and sleep for a couple of more hours.

How about you? Do you refer to run quiet or loud trains and why?

Also, what do, or did, you do, if anything, to increase or decrease the sound?

Arnold

Last edited by Arnold D. Cribari
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Many build their bench work and layouts in such a way as to deaden or lessen the sound. I can understand that if it's necessary so as not to disturb others, such as a hobbyist who lives in an apartment building or other multiple unit dwelling.

My preference is not to minimize, but instead maximize, the sounds and loudness of the trains I run with one exception.

Why?

In my experience, real trains, especially locomotives, are breathtakingly loud. I like that aspect of realism for all my O Gauge trains.

The only exception: I run quiet trains when my wife is asleep. Unlike me, she sleeps very well and has never had insomnia.

I often wake up in the middle of the night. When I do, I often like to go downstairs and run quiet trains, typically a Williams diesel or early Pre-Protosounds MTH engines, so as not to disturb my wife's sleep. After maybe 15 to 30 minutes of quiet train running, I usually return to bed and sleep for a couple of more hours.

How about you? Do you refer to run quiet or loud trains and why?

Also, what do, or did, you do, if anything, to increase or decrease the sound?

Arnold

As I sit quite often by the CXS yard not too far from my house I note that the trains are not loud except when whistling to cross the road. They are limited to under 10 mph.

As far as my layout goes both of my older steam engines running at the same time creates a cacophony of chug'chug'chugs which can be deafening. My grandson definitely does not like it.

I do like the wailing whistles......

My diesel have authentic sound and are a little more tolerable. The GG1 has a non prototypical buzz and chiming whistle. The Williams steamer only has a recorded white and weak bell. It is kind of like eating oatmeal with nothing on it.

Sometimes I like the trains loud - sometimes I like the trains quiet.

When I want it really peaceful I turn the power on the layout and enjoy the lightship in silence. No trains are running.

I'm more on the noise side of things, although I found that the new Lionel Legacy GP-9s make rediculous "rail sounds" that are little more than wife-wakers. Not particulairly enjoyable. As for those quiet times, I do enjoy just the sound of wheels, but may favorite is parking an MTH GP 38 or GP35 at idle and taking a nap next to it. Amazing way to fall asleep!

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OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

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