Well here goes...

As suggested I am starting a new topic focusing on how I make small tinplate wagons for my Hornby MO Layout.

Here is one I made earlier...

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Please Note: When working with sheet metal and power tools - always wear protective gloves and protective eyewear as well as any other PPE required. It’s a lot easier than a trip to the ER! 

First of all I draw up a design in a very basic 2d CAD program. (That’s all I know how to use) and print out the design.

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Then I use PVA glue to glue it to some 0.6mm Zincalume sheet from the hardware store. And after letting the glue dry use a Stanley knife to scribe the design on to the zinc sheet. 

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To be continued..

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

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Original Post

Next I use a auto punch to mark out the drill holes. 

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Then using tin snips I make all the possible cuts I can. 

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Then using Nibble Pliers I nibble away the excess material in areas I can’t get to with the tin snips. Then I dress the edges using a small flat file. 

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To be continued...

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

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Photos (3)

Then I drill all the holes required (In hindsight this should have been done before cutting out. (Also note extra river detail added on a whim using an auto punch.) 

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Then Using a Jewlers saw and small  files I cut out the slots for the coupler. I tried a different complicated method this time and went very pear shaped. So don’t be like me and keep it simple Sam!  Next it’s off to the vice to bend the metal sided in to place. 

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I highly recommend using a small bending brake to get nice clean bends. As you can see in the pics the corners end up rounded in a vice. 

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Well the rheumatism has got the better of me so I’ll call it a day and have another crack at finishing it tomorrow. 

I am only very new to working with tinplate so any help and suggestions are more than appreciated. 

To be continued...

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

Attachments

Photos (3)

The couplers are made next and are made following the same process as the wagon body. This time I installed them using smaller brass bolts from the scrap bin.  Axels are made from old coat hanger wire with copper spacers. I didn’t have the right size copper tube so I had to cut it down the middle and open up the tube for it to fit over the axels. 

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Next is painting and making a wagon load to fit on top. To be continued..,

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

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Photos (3)
Jamie Thompson posted:

Then I drill all the holes required (In hindsight this should have been done before cutting out. (Also note extra river detail added on a whim using an auto punch.) 

 

Then Using a Jewlers saw and small  files I cut out the slots for the coupler. I tried a different complicated method this time and went very pear shaped. So don’t be like me and keep it simple Sam!  Next it’s off to the vice to bend the metal sided in to place. 

I highly recommend using a small bending brake to get nice clean bends. As you can see in the pics the corners end up rounded in a vice. 

 

I am only very new to working with tinplate so any help and suggestions are more than appreciated. 

To be continued...

Looks like you are doing great to me.

I checked out the glitter houses site. Between that and this thread your methods are pretty clear, although I am still not 100% sure I am following you on the wheels/axles.

I am trying to learn to due some tinplate work myself, and am probably going to take on build a small brake soon.

Could you post a picture of the jewelers saw and some of the files you are using?  My interest so far has been to make my front pilot and coupler for my mth 263e loco so I can double head and run longer tinplate trains.  I am hoping to make a design I can repeat and maybe even make available to others.

IMG_6705[1]IMG_6709[1]

May God Bless us all.

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Photos (2)
jhz563 posted:
Jamie Thompson posted:

Then I drill all the holes required (In hindsight this should have been done before cutting out. (Also note extra river detail added on a whim using an auto punch.) 

 

Then Using a Jewlers saw and small  files I cut out the slots for the coupler. I tried a different complicated method this time and went very pear shaped. So don’t be like me and keep it simple Sam!  Next it’s off to the vice to bend the metal sided in to place. 

I highly recommend using a small bending brake to get nice clean bends. As you can see in the pics the corners end up rounded in a vice. 

 

I am only very new to working with tinplate so any help and suggestions are more than appreciated. 

To be continued...

Looks like you are doing great to me.

I checked out the glitter houses site. Between that and this thread your methods are pretty clear, although I am still not 100% sure I am following you on the wheels/axles.

I am trying to learn to due some tinplate work myself, and am probably going to take on build a small brake soon.

Could you post a picture of the jewelers saw and some of the files you are using?  My interest so far has been to make my front pilot and coupler for my mth 263e loco so I can double head and run longer tinplate trains.  I am hoping to make a design I can repeat and maybe even make available to others.

IMG_6705[1]IMG_6709[1]

Thanks for the encouragement  JHZ563! 

Your pilot and coupler are coming along very well indeed! I believe they will be very popular if you make the available to everyone else as planned. There’s nothing like being able to double head loco’s with a centipede of wagons behind.

As per your question about the axles, the spacer is placed in front of the wheel to stop the wheel rubbing on the body work in corners. Usually I would cut a piece of tube and simply slide it on to the axle but in this case the only tube I ha was smaller.  I had to cut a slot down the middle of the tube and using a flat blade screw driver widen the slot thudding making the inside diameter wider so it could slide on to the axles. 

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Here are pictures of the Jewlers saw and the nibbles pliers I use. 

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I hope this helps. Please feel free to ask any more questions!

 

 

 

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

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Photos (3)

Well next I painted the chassis and couplers using 3 coats of acrylic and after the dried cleaned out the paint in the axle holes to stop excessive friction. 

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Now I needed to make a load for the wagon to carry. Living in an area once famous for its timbers and sawmills decided to make a timber load.

I found an off cut the apron size and cut grooves into the block using a metal hacksaw and widened the slots with a small triangle file. Then I simply oiled the wood to preserve it. 

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It looked rather bland on the wagon so I next added “chains” by cutting slots underneath the wooden block and wrapping around some fine twisted wire. 

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Than all that was needed was to assemble the wagon and superglue the wood load on. )Next time I will secure the load by screwing it on from underneath)

And now for the not so grand unveiling.

It won’t win a beauty contest but It won’t look to bad trundling around my layout.

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Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

Attachments

Photos (6)

Very nice. I like the wood load and how you made the metal strap for the wood.

Is there anyway you can send me your pattern to my email address in my profile page, looking to make some for my Lionel 150's

RonH

Don't Junk it, Make it Work!

 

Jamie - thank you for your support!  Right now I need to find the time to refine the design so that the articulating bar doesn't get hung up on those giant front wheels.  I may or may not have time to tinker this weekend.  If I do I will keep you posted.

Meanwhile I see you are full steam ahead on paint and a very cool wood load.  Instead of glue or screws I would recommend a small magnet.  The refrigerator quality stuff comes with an adhesive backing and is can be cut with a regular pair of scissors.  You can pick it up by the roll at a decent hardware store.  That would of course allow easy swapping of loads and prevent things from falling off without permanent fasteners. 

 

May God Bless us all.

My advice is to wear sturdy leather gloves when working with tin. I bought the colored breathable ones in a three pack at Home Depot. It's cheaper than bandaids, aspirin and emergency rooms in the long run. 

Also, it's a good idea to wear eye protection when drilling and grinding tin. Oh, and use a vice when drilling instead of holding the piece in your hand like someone I know...

George

RonH posted:

Very nice. I like the wood load and how you made the metal strap for the wood.

Is there anyway you can send me your pattern to my email address in my profile page, looking to make some for my Lionel 150's

Certainly Ron.

i will email it through tomorrow when I get home. 

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

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