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Original subway stations were pretty short, and they were soon extended for longer trains. But in some cases the extensions had to be built on curves, and the cars were too far from the platform in those locations, so extenders were installed.

The extenders are retracted until the train comes to a stop in the station, then they extend to fill in the gap between the platform and the car doors.  Once the doors close, the train waits for the extenders to retract, then it can leave the station.

Thanks very much Joe', for the explanation.  I had no idea.  Funny, my Dad was a motorman in the 40s... on the IRT and other lines too.  I can just imagine what is reaction to the modern technology of the past few years.....  You have a very interesting educational thread'.. 👍✔

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Video:

https://youtube.com/shorts/YhB9XrrSx_g?feature=share

After my first Covid experience (three days under the covers), AND  a nasty cold three weeks later (with antibiotics, expectorants, steroids and nebulizer treatments), installation of the moving part of extenders is complete. Now follows installation of the platform overlay.

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Last edited by West Side Joe

@West Side Joe  great mechanical engineering job.

The "kids" today use modeling software to design and do a virtual build so that they will be reasonably certain the extenders will operate as expected.  What modeling software did you use?  What control software are you using?

Second - if I did this - I would forget the platforms were extended and have the cars leave the station. What would/will happen if you also forget to retract the platforms?

I have really enjoyed following your sojourn in subway modeling. Thanks for documenting and sharing. Jeff

I confess I did not use any modeling software for design or for control. I searched for model grilles that were the approximate scale size, and sketched an approximate idea before putting it together with Plastruct girders and sheets that I had on hand.

I also explored various turnout control machines (and the possibility of manual control) before settling on the Peco Smartswitches, which offer a very fine degree of programmable control with a separate control unit, that then can be set and left alone. I didn't realize how big of a field there is in modeling applications for servo control, including model airplanes and cars.  The components of the Peco Smartswitches are actually made by a Taiwanese company that sells a range of servo control components to hobbyists. These servos can also be used for animations like working gates, moving equipment, etc.

And just like the real extenders, if they are not retracted as the train leaves, there will indeed be damage! 😁

Very cool  Love them 



"Original subway stations were pretty short, and they were soon extended for longer trains. But in some cases the extensions had to be built on curves, and the cars were too far from the platform in those locations, so extenders were installed."

This really isnt true   The stations were curved from day 1.  Until they stopped using it South Ferry had the platform extenders on a total of 5 car train   They made announcements at the previous station to move to the first five cars as the back would not be open   The platform extenders were there a long time and were the responsibility of the signal maintainers to make them work properly

I stand corrected. I was under the impression that some stations (14th Street on the East Side?) were lengthened into curves and thus needed the extenders. That's the back story for my layout. 😁

I also understood that some curved stations (City Hall, South Ferry) originally didn't need extenders because the first subway cars only had end doors which were close to the platforms, but that extenders were needed when they started using cars with center doors (not at City Hall, which closed early). In any case, extenders are cool! 😃

Last edited by West Side Joe

I stand corrected. I was under the impression that some stations (14th Street on the East Side?) were lengthened into curves and thus needed the extenders. That's the back story for my layout. 😁

I also understood that some curved stations (City Hall, South Ferry) originally didn't need extenders because the first subway cars only had end doors which were close to the platforms, but that extenders were needed when they started using cars with center doors (not at City Hall, which closed early). In any case, extenders are cool! 😃

Now that is true  Gap fillers were needed after 1940 whne the cars had doors the length of the cars   The end doors of the old cars would be closer to the platform and I think people were smarter then and didnt step between the platform and car  LOL

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