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Our MTH PS-2, 0-8-0 engine on it's 1st test run across the turntable to the Roundhouse took off and bang into the back wall of the HR.  By the time I got the roof off and grabbed the engine which was still running.  I then put the engine back on a track and started it up and everything worked like was suppose to, but forward or reverse the engine won't move.  I took the engine apart and turned the motor forward and reverse.  The drivers worked as they should.  I did a OHM test the two wires yellow and green and that worked.  Any ideas what to check next?

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The battery helps get the engine out of neutral. If the battery is dead, all sorts of issues pop up.

You can test the battery by killing the power while the engine is idling and see how long the sound play. If the sounds cut right off, there is an issue with the battery or charging system.

Did the engine reset properly?

Does it run in conventional mode?

Last edited by Engineer-Joe

Place the engine on a piece of straight track that’s easily reached. Start the engine up and throttle it up. Just move the tether wire slightly side to side and see if the engine moves forward or reverse. A roller base comes in handy for this as the engine can’t get away from you. But you could just put something soft across the rails to catch it if takes off.

If could be a number of things but the tether is a good place to start. The tether itself could have a wire break or the PCB with the pins it plugs into could have a bad solder joint. I have a couple of 0-8-0’s and both had this issue. Was usually more on curves as far as erratic running when the tether had some strain on it. Both needed the PCB board pins touched up with a soldering pencil.

Dave, I tried what you suggested, everything works fine.  I loosen up drivers and still no movement.  The engine locked-up in the past but I fixed that problem a while ago.  I inspected wires and pins with a magnifying glass and  bright Led light.  Nothing to be seen.

Joe,  As far as the battery the sound shuts down in a couple of seconds.  The battery has a red & black wires.  I tried to take the battery out but I was afraid of breaking something.  The wires are very tight so I couldn't disconnect it.  Is there a certain way to pry it out.

@Missabe posted:

John because I have know way of load testing.   I don't know if the 2.4v battery is bad as suggested.  I metered it at 2.5v.  It's probably 8/10 years old or longer.

If I need to get a replacement and batteries are getting up dated what would suggest.

For what it's worth, simply metering ANY batter, with a digital or analog DC volt meter, does NOT reflect the condition of said battery. Any battery should be "tested" with the use of a battery testing meeter, which actually places a load on said battery. That is the ONLY way to properly check the condition of any battery.

I just replaced my battery in mine with a BCR. The battery is buried in there.  Rather than dig it out. If it’s like the one I just did. It’s easier to remove the 2 slide switches and the battery bracket itself. The screws are small but easily reached and your not moving wires around to gain access. If you are running with DCS. Usually the engine will display an Engine Not On Track on the display if the battery has gone south or needs charging. The battery helps it retain it’s ID during the shutdown sequence. They usually re add without an issue but will require some attention or it just keeps happening.

I remember weathering this engine many years ago. I usually weather the running gear on a roller base. I had the shell off and a harness unplugged going to a board that resided in the top of the shell. I usually run the engine at 3 smph and hit everything moving with the airbrush. From what I remember. The engine had no speed control till I plugged that board back in. That was my first thought when your engine took off. But the engine functioned fine as far as moving. Just did it all full speed.

The best test for an MTH battery. Is when your shutting the engine down. You should hear the shutdown sequence for about 5 seconds. Don’t hit Shutdown on the remote. You will always here the sounds as the engine  is still seeing track voltage. The proper test is to kill your power to the track and then listen.

I bought a LN older engine many years ago. Probably was displayed. Engine added without issue and ran fine. Every time I went to run it I had to delete it and re add it. Figured I better pull the shell and check the battery out. Probably needed charging.  The early models had no charging ports. There was NO Battery in it. It was purchased out of a collection. I’m guessing the battery was pulled worrying about possible corrosion.

When I experienced the issue you describe, the problem turned out to be a bad tether connection between the engine and the tender.  Specifically, a few of the wire-to-pin solder joints in the socket where the tether plugs into the engine had failed.  I fixed the problem by reheating the solder joints, being especially careful to ensure that melted solder did not migrate to adjacent pins.

@700E posted:

When I experienced the issue you describe, the problem turned out to be a bad tether connection between the engine and the tender.  Specifically, a few of the wire-to-pin solder joints in the socket where the tether plugs into the engine had failed.  I fixed the problem by reheating the solder joints, being especially careful to ensure that melted solder did not migrate to adjacent pins.

I too have had this happen on 2 different steam engines. I couldn't see the problem until I remelted the solder. One wire was loose but appeared to be intact.

I suggested what I did above, trying to narrow down the issue. It's tuff, when you don't control the testing and learn what's actually going on.

Questions go unanswered and that doesn't help either. A test in conventional and knowing if it reset, would be first IMO.

I never suggested tearing out the battery but I don't know what's really going on here.

Last edited by Engineer-Joe
@700E posted:

When I experienced the issue you describe, the problem turned out to be a bad tether connection between the engine and the tender.  Specifically, a few of the wire-to-pin solder joints in the socket where the tether plugs into the engine had failed.  I fixed the problem by reheating the solder joints, being especially careful to ensure that melted solder did not migrate to adjacent pins.

This is actually a fairly common issue, I've seen it a number of times.

It is not the wires rather the pin exposed on the pad.  The pins are soldered to a pad that extends to where the wires are soldered.

Since you had a motion issue you solder the Wht and Yel wire pins.  Normally you can see the solder joint cracks.  Make sure you do not blob the solder and bridge other pins/pads/wires.

This also can be a bad tether.  G

@Missabe posted:

I checked the entire tether all wires connected and the female connect is ok.  All the male pins solidly connected.  I have a come the same conclusion as you did a bad tether.

Exactly how did you check the tether?  Typically, the intermittent issues with these is a broken wire that can show continuity until it moves in a specific direction.  If the pins are all secure in the engine tether PCB, and wiggling the tether illustrates the issue, replace the tether.

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