Elliot, I am so glad your layout tour was a big success! But more important I am glad you had time to spend with your son and that he is moving back. I sure hope you have lots of time together and lots of fun!  I am sure he will jump right in on that JMIR stuff, the young folks now a days are really into stuff like that! 

Take care and rest up so when your son and Patrick return you are ready!

Mike

USMC 5/11 Battalion Oscar Battery 155 Big Guns!

Semper Fi !

Menards addiction Meeting member! /  LCCA# 41824

Tom Tee posted:

Your creation begs the question I ask my self, what will be come of it when we are no longer here?

Personally I view my RR like some do their daily cross word puzzle.  Just a creative pleasure,  then toss it.

Tom - That is the $64,000 question, and I think about it all the time. I figure as long as my wife stays in the house, it can stay. If I can get it to the level of smooth operation, and have a crew that wants to run it, they could probably do that even after I'm gone. If that seems a little strange, a couple years ago, I attended an op session exactly like that, where the widow was still letting the guys come over. Eventually, they did tear it down, because she wanted the basement space back, but in my case the house is so big, the space isn't an issue. There's still plenty of basement without the train room, and my wife doesn't like going down the stairs anyway. Now if my son becomes attached to it, and learns to maintain it, it may stay around even longer. BTW, how do you like the skirts?

Mike - Thanks, he did seem to like the technical stuff when I explained it to him, and told him that I would love his help with it. When I spoke to him yesterday, I tried to explain my strange TMCC theory that I've had for years, which goes like this: TMCC uses seven data bits for channel number transmission, that's 128 possible channels (0-127). However, because the remote only accepts a two digit code, that limits you to 100 (0-99). Technically, channels 100-127 are out there in limbo. Can a computer access them? So, if you bypass the limitation of the remote, and can assign them using the computer, you open up those addresses for the computer to run. It's a goofy theory, I know, but If true, my layout has a use for it. Anyway, it took me a couple tries on the phone, but I think he understood the concept. I should have asked Dale Manquen that when he was alive. Maybe GunrunnerJohn  could shed some light on that one.

Elliot, my sense is no for additional TMCC addresses.  I'm not sure why they limited it to 99, but I suspect it's embedded in the software more than just the keyboard entry limitations.  For one, the Legacy system uses 99 an an "all engines" code, so you really have one less.  When the system was designed, I suspect anyone having 99 locomotives was judged inconceivable.

Well, that seems a bit short sighted on their part John. Don't DCS and DCC allow four digit addresses?

We all die sooner and hopefully later. Also this hobby does not die that seems to be an issue too.  The last I checked we can not take it with us. Be it my boat, car(s) or the trains and other assorted hobbies. Have an exit plan if possible.

George

Well George, hobbies as we know them really grew out of the post war era, when things were very different. The pace of life was much slower, and people didn't have to work themselves to death to make ends meet. When it comes to this hobby, it takes the right mix of four elements, time, space, money and desire. All we can do to preserve the hobby is try to get people interested in what we do. If each of us just finds one person to replace them, the hobby will survive. When it is viewed in those terms, things don't sound quite so ominous. I've been working most of my life toward that end.

  • I've worked in a hobby store selling trains
  • I've done train shows with my portable layout
  • I've been in train clubs that reach out to the public
  • I had my own business exposing the public to trains
  • I've shared my love of trains with friends and family

 enterTRAINment had over 100,000 paid visits. I'd be willing to bet that with all of that energy spent, I've gotten a few more than my quota, but there's no way of knowing. Of course there's my son, but the jury is still out on that one. Fingers crossed. Now if we would just quit dying, we'd be in business.

My goodness, your ability to astound has no end, Elliot!   I find the use of that landscaping fabric for skirting a particularly ingenious idea.  One of those repurposing strokes of brilliance that's worth stealing, if ever I get to that stage.

Bravo!

Bruce

Completely designed with your mind in mind.

Big_Boy_4005 posted:

Well George, hobbies as we know them really grew out of the post war era, when things were very different. The pace of life was much slower, and people didn't have to work themselves to death to make ends meet. When it comes to this hobby, it takes the right mix of four elements, time, space, money and desire. All we can do to preserve the hobby is try to get people interested in what we do. If each of us just finds one person to replace them, the hobby will survive. When it is viewed in those terms, things don't sound quite so ominous. I've been working most of my life toward that end.

  • I've worked in a hobby store selling trains
  • I've done train shows with my portable layout
  • I've been in train clubs that reach out to the public
  • I had my own business exposing the public to trains
  • I've shared my love of trains with friends and family

 enterTRAINment had over 100,000 paid visits. I'd be willing to bet that with all of that energy spent, I've gotten a few more than my quota, but there's no way of knowing. Of course there's my son, but the jury is still out on that one. Fingers crossed. Now if we would just quit dying, we'd be in business.

Very well said Elliot! This hobby is going to live way past all of us! All you have to do is look around at the faces on some of the kids, not all but there are a few out there that there eyes really light up at the sight of a real train or a model train! So if you think this hobby is going to die you better sell your stuff now while you still can before the marked drops out! LOL

Mike

USMC 5/11 Battalion Oscar Battery 155 Big Guns!

Semper Fi !

Menards addiction Meeting member! /  LCCA# 41824

The Geo cloth looks great.  The large pleats are very important, they will facilitate lifting and crawling under.  I like the way the flat black draws attention to the RR.

However, for me, I'm unsettled with any enclosure.  I do not like spiders and I absolutely hate large basement spiders and camel crickets, so I am reluctant to give them any hiding place.  I spray the wall's base and set out glue boards.  If you want a shocker sometime, place a few glue boards around the floor under the layout and check it out every week or so.  Yikes!!  Maybe it's just me.

Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

Bruce - Thanks, but I can't claim credit for the landscape fabric idea. I don't remember where I saw it, but I liked it right away when I did. It might have even been here on the forum. I will take credit for how we executed it. The rail we installed was my idea. It was the best way I could think of to follow the edge of the layout. Then we just stapled the fabric on. Technically, I'm not really at that stage of completion to have done this. There's still a good deal of messy scenery work to do. I just have to use drop cloths to keep it nice. The very last thing is the carpet. Maybe next year for that.

Mike - Thanks. If anyone is in this hobby for the money, they made the wrong bet. We do this because we love it. I have to really talk to my son about this. What I  don't want is for him doing the trains to please me. I want him to do it because HE wants to and enjoys it.

Tom - I might get the occasional daddy long legs in the train room, but not much else. The exterminator comes out quarterly. For a while I had a mouse problem, and would find those little black grains of rice on different parts of the layout, but after a couple visits, we taught those mousies to keep out, on penalty of death. We have gotten ahead of that problem, and stop them before they get in. We do get box elder bugs in the fall many years, and last night my wife sent me a picture of a raccoon on the front porch.

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Big_Boy_4005 posted:

Bruce - Thanks, but I can't claim credit for the landscape fabric idea. I don't remember where I saw it, but I liked it right away when I did. It might have even been here on the forum. I will take credit for how we executed it. The rail we installed was my idea. It was the best way I could think of to follow the edge of the layout. Then we just stapled the fabric on. Technically, I'm not really at that stage of completion to have done this. There's still a good deal of messy scenery work to do. I just have to use drop cloths to keep it nice. The very last thing is the carpet. Maybe next year for that.

 

Elliot

On a similar note using a similar material, I have been employing house wrap to form a base for scenery on my open grid construction.  Stapled in place, it's impervious to holes or tears unless cut with a knife.     Whether original or not, the idea just suits the purpose, especially when considering how economical it is for larger applications.

Until there is further progress with roughing in electrical, scenery and fascia, skirting will need to wait.  Till then, there's no hiding my hoarding problem.  But at least there now is a feasible, economic solution  permanently filed away in the old grey matter.  Thanks!

Bruce

Completely designed with your mind in mind.

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