I took apart a very rough Marx caboose this morning.  I'm thinking work caboose.  I have a flat car that I don't like.  Maybe this will help.  Messing with the photos on the computer, I feel the caboose needs to be boobed just over one section width.  All design ideas are welcome.  This will be my first custom train car.  Any suggestions on how to get a clean cut?  Will Testors model glue put the shortened caboose back together?  I have same brand putty too.

 

go4 002run 005run 002run 003While making a pick up run to the Soggy Bottom Scrapyard, a new idea started.  Lionel Lines 6047 is my first caboose (about 1960).  I would like for it to roll well (see axles) and get interior lighting of some sort.  What about window glass?   Would it be easier to buy a good used fancy model and put my shell on it?  Again, input requested.

I summon forth the vast knowledge database that is the OGR Forum.

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For clean cuts in car bodies I use a good razor saw. I have 3 X-acto in different sizes. Atlas made one that was decent and cheap...not sure they still make it or not. 

For glue I's use epoxy for a good strong bond. Get some Gorilla Glue 5 minute...cheap and at most big box or drug stores. 

Good luck.

for your Lionel Caboose, I'd look for a Postwar model with the light. These are usually pretty cheap, especially if you get one with a broken shell, which is easy to find. That'll get you the light, the window insert,good trucks, plus a damaged shell for another project.

How about painting it a work car gray and adding the overhang in the back on. Maybe a ladder. Doncarcab2420b_ident

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Last edited by scale rail

Bill,  Glad you dove in.  You could place a 1/2" x 1/2" length of wood at the base of each wall.  That will strengthen the walls and provide larger surfaces for the adhesive which should make a much stronger model. May I suggest when you are ready to paint, apply a brown or black primer coat after assembling is completed?  That will give your paint a good base and if there is any bleed through(reverse weathering), the original colors will not be seen.  John in Lansing, Ill

Last edited by rattler21

A steel transfer caboose is not a common item in O scale or Traditional O gauge, unlike in N and HO scale.

Look at steel bodied Transfer Cabooses in other scales for design ideas.

Andrew 

 

Very good ideas again guys.

Steamer Dave, I found a #2357 first series with a broken shell.  One issue down.  Did you start with a #2420?  Very nice car with the detail I like.

Rattler21,  Very good idea.

How can I make the open deck look more like distressed wood?

 

 
Odenville Bill posted:

How can I make the open deck look more like distressed wood?

 

Box car interior paper

Work Train Williams obsvn car cut down

Weaver weathered SF box car

Bill, card stock sheets available at $3.  Buy one and copy it locally for less.  John in Lansing, ILL

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Last edited by rattler21

It was a 2419 (no spotlight) I picked up at a show for $7 at a show, intending to use the trucks and mounting plates on another car. It was missing the toolboxes, but when I got home I spotted a pair in my junk box, so I had no choice but to rebuild it.

Coffee stir sticks if it must be real wood. 

   Color washes can bring out any detail already there that is imperceptible most of the time; "pop". (blk, brwn, grey¿?)

  Cheap water based craft acrylics are a good place to start. If you dont like it, wash it off. Cure time has a direct relationship to how quickly each layer of color may wash off. So a mistake removed today doesn't always effect the one before it. But enough dawn & a stiff plastic brush and paint years old is comming off (more so with flats and satins, glosses hang on tighter).  

  I mostly just save my brushwater for washes, every color pigment within black, similar to real earth and weathering aroun here; milage may vary. Sometimes I brush it on, sometimes I pour it on, literally.  Too dark?; water it down. Too light?; add a drop of color. No hurry, no worry.

Windows: Frosted? Scotch tape.     Window panes? Carry out salad container, Q-tip box, etc. .  Just avoid super glue, the fumes cloud the clear plastics. (the clearest glue for models is "Canopy glue", but not really "needed" here)  I have some Scotch tape widows that I added in the early 70s. that still haven't lifted. (two layers stuck together on the pane so the tack layer doesn't collect dust..e.g., a short piece centered on a long one, so the ends can hold it up)

Lighting is always cool.  Wait till you run passenger cars in a dark room with some mood music, lol. 

 I almost hate the thought, but I had a single led lit by 1 D cell for near 4 months.  If it was dimmed, it might have been doubled that. If I shut it off on occasion, maybe a year or more. The weight of the battery was nice too. Not for every car, and I hate dead batterys with a passion, never remember to buy them either, but that timeframe is at the back of my mind a lot anyhow.

A pick up shoe can be made from a brass feeler gauge and some isolation. (automotive, etc) They are pretty reliable. So far they perform better on my problem turnouts than some rollers and manufactured shoes do. They also flicker less than rollers... but do have more drag.  On one or two cars, I find it very acceptible.  5 or 6 shoes adds up though. 

I've also made rollers from bushings, not great though. Pickup relies on a large diameter side thrust connection and it gets iffy. The side pressure makes contact, but also more thrust drag and without the benefit of spring weight for traction at roller, the sides drag can stop the roller from spinning. (normal set ups don't rely on side thrust contact, this uses the axle and an isolated plastic tube cover, within the bushing's center. The (heavy, ball shaped) bushing center just floats very loosely around the axle & tube with a 1/16" -1/8" overize diameter hole, the bushing weight is the only downforce. )

The axle tips shown may be blunt end types. Not a lot to do but change to a needle tip truck or going with cast rollerbearing trucks, etc.. Choosing a pair with rollers only prudent if you do change (& fyi, there are many slight changes in trucks, some more easily noticed than others; look VERY close at heights especially, despite similar appearing sideframes etc.. )

Over time, the stops or sqeezed part of the axles that limits side travel of wheels, can wear flat and drag. They may even let the wheel backs short on pw uncouplers and turnout rails. A small washer there can help with side thrust drag against the stop sometimes.  Brass and plastic tubes (stir straws to pen parts) for use as axle tubes is another option (applicable to pickup mounting too)

Polish the axle. Oil the wheel/axle (or use a dry lube like t-9, dries to a thin teflon wax coat). Graphite used sparingly works well, but is too messy for most folk.

  "Is it worth it?" is a matter of opinion. Some folk need a store bought fit and finish to be happy, some don't. Know thyself     

 Personally I have enough fun building, that the outcome is nearly redundant. Nearly each one becomes a new favorite. The non-favs get used, but might become something else when I'm ready again.

On the cut, I use exacto saws for close cuts, or if I can spare material, dremel wheels (carefully, they can get grabby in plastic) or my bandsaw ; cutting close, but not on my lines (if possible).

  Then I use a big flat file, or sandpaper on glass or plate metal, etc. to remove material till I like the mating seams . Gluing the paper really helps. If the paper isnt secured, it just isn't as flat when sanded (glass is best too) (3m spray glue is ideal for sandpaper imo, lightly so its easily peeled off later) 

Backing any seams with plastic scrap adds strength, along with the suggestion for blocks to reinforce 90° joints at the body to car, it will make it a survivor.

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





I knew the fountain would flow.  Thank you gentlemen.  I will need a wood floor for my favorite boxcar too.  I needed a winter-blues kick start.  Here we go.  I'll cut the caboose today.

Here it is in it's cut down form.  Now to put it back together.

003         

I found the guts to my first steam engine.  The wheels will go to the Soggy Bottom Scrapyard.  What does the accumulative imagination do with excess smoke units?004

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now you did it...there's no turning back now. Before too long you'll be on the floor going thru the junk boxes at shows looking for the next project!

 I put junk parts (wheels,broken steam chests, etc) around my service yard. 

It was a modern one, but I looked for a motor and shot for the moon.IMG_20180109_004235

  Does the scout motor still run? Whats wrong with it? It's your railroad; build a yard critter. 

IMG_20180819_151115

If you run command only, Then maybe make an outdoor stationary flywheel engine(running or static)? Gasses, petrols?, steam? There were a lot of cool "stationary tractor motors". Use the rod reaching indoors to "power an industry". Maybe a leather belt drive instead?  Remove a wheelset or just cover one set and frame with flat, riveted panels; i.e., an "big iron box" with dual flywheels(drivers), a few levers, dials, valves, and crooked stovepipe stack with dunce cap rain guard.

Sometimes smoke can be fitted up to non-smokers. 

  A tiny fan (they get real small; under 1"square)and it might serve as a structure's smoke. Or even static smoke if it drafts well without help. 

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





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The end is glued to the car body and I started with filler.  I need to fill the hole in the door.  I used a rubber band to hold the caboose on the flatcar and ran it around the track.  I'm trying to decide which end will be the back.  How am I doing now?  Anyone want some rusty MARX trucks?004

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It has been slow.  Here we are today.  The second coat of filler is on.  I sprayed a light coat of primer to eyeball the progress.  The replaced rear awning is welcome and lines up well with the ladder.  I cut a little off the bottom.  I'm thinking about a safety yellow body on a black flatcar.  I hope I remember to paint the inside first.DSC03014

DSC03015

In the background is my freshly painted Plasticville water tower.

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