I have started the planning for my new layout. My current layout is in my parents' house. We tried to sell the house and needed to tear the layout down in my basement. That effort failed. It probably worked out though, because we had a small flood when we lost power. My sump pump runs all the time and during big storms, there is way too much water for a battery backup. I have two sump pits that are connected with separate pumps, so if I don't lose power, I should be good. So, the first step is to install an NG powered generator this Spring. I'm planning to insulate the walls with a paper foil-faced rigid foam that is paintable and meets fire code. I do not plan to put up drywall or a ceiling due to cost, mess, time and low ceiling height. More too come ...

Original Post

George, good news.  That's always exciting.  I'm confused by your description though.  Is the new layout going to be at your house or your parent's?  And how is it that tearing down the old layout failed?  And that was the one at your parent's house?  I guess it doesn't matter really but I read that a few times and remain confused.

MikeH

I have a lot of plywood and wood ladder that I use for legs. The layout deck can be put together in a number of geometries. I’ll have at least two levels. I want this to be a multi-scale tinplate layout with standard gauge, O and O27. I would like the standard gauge to be on the outside, but am running into issues fitting my O gauge turntable and yard into this arrangement, because they need to be outside the standard gauge loops. I’m trying to avoid grades for the older tinplate but that is one option. I wish there was an O / Standard gauge crossing. I’m also trying to avoid simple loops to add interest. I have used reversing loops in the past. 

George

beachhead2 posted:

George, good news.  That's always exciting.  I'm confused by your description though.  Is the new layout going to be at your house or your parent's?  And how is it that tearing down the old layout failed?  And that was the one at your parent's house?  I guess it doesn't matter really but I read that a few times and remain confused.

Ahhh, sorry. Pronouns are a curse on language and meaning! 

The new layout will be at my house in my basement. What failed was the sale of our house. The real estate taxes and school district have killed its value. The old layout was taken down and moved to my parents in preparation for putting my house up for sale.

I will be moving the layout back from my parents, but it will be reconfigured in the process.

George

Steamer posted:

I know they make 5 rail track for Standard/O, I would think there might be a crossover? Maybe Steve Eastman would know.

There are plans available to build 5 rail switches, but not for crossovers that I am aware of.

Steve

 

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

I did a search and found this thread: https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...like-brands-of-track

Looks like ACE made a custom O gauge crossover. It would be easy to modify this for O and Standard gauge. I don't have a radial arm saw, so I'll need to be creative on how to mill the junction. It looks like it would work well and solve my problem. My other minor problem is that two loops of O and two loops of Standard is a lot of track and may constrain my space for accessories. I'll update this thread as I make progress. It might be a while given the time involved in prepping the space.

George

BlueComet400 posted:

Hey George, this is great--you have a blank canvas. Looking forward to seeing the progress. Are you going to York?

 

John

Hi John, Thanks! I’m not sure yet on York. It’s a little far off for me still considering I hardly know where I am traveling the next two weeks.

Will definitely look you up if I do. I’d like to get there Wednesday to see a bandit meet and “rush the door” to the Blue Hall on Thursday.

George

It looks relatively easy to make the Standard / O gauge combo crossover. I found a Dremel router table for about $30 and need a 1/8 inch bit. I hope the table fits my battery powered Dremel. Now, I just need to find 11/16 inch plastic stock. I have some 1/2 inch Corion from a kitchen demolition that would work but might be too thin. I need to route a depth of 3/8 inch for the rail height. I could also get 3/4 inch stock and sand it down a 1/16 inch.

George

Here is my first attempt at the STD / O crossover.

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The router cutting method is not working too well. I think the Dremel is not sturdy enough for the Corian. I ended up chipping a corner with it too. Also, the grooves need to be just a little wider. Lastly, I did not realize that the O gauge rail height is lower than Standard gauge. I'm going to need to shim the O gauge tracks. Plastic might be a little easier to work with than Corian, but I don't have any thick enough.

I'll keep working on it. I will actually need two of these on my layout.

George

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Ok, it took me until now to get this far. The space is clear and the generator is in to keep the basement dry in a power outage. Here are pics of the space from each side.

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I’m thinking about painting the ceiling. It’s a little too short to finish with tile or drywall. I also need to add more lighting. The space is roughly 39’ x 20’.

George

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Looks like a nice space for a layout.  

Use LED lighting for the room.  Econolight.com is a good place to order from.  They are in Sturtevant and my orders are always delivered next day.  Look for their deals when ordering, generally 10% to 15% off, with code.

I went with the panels that drop into my ceiling grid, but they sell several different styles.

NWL

I finally finished (almost, some touch ups needed) painting the basement ceiling in my layout room. I also added some room divider partitions to hide the unsightly basement infrastructure. Here are some pics.

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I added a lot of lighting including can and track lights. I also added an electrical outlet near the place that will have the control panel for the layout.

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Next will be painting the walls and some floor touch ups.

George

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I envy you guys with these huge basements.  My basement is 10' x 20' with a boiler, A/C air handler, well tank and electric panels.  I have squeezed a 3' x 12' temporary layout into the space.  It's not the ideal venue but it will suffice until D2 gets her stuff out of my garage attic.  

Sorry to seem like I'm hijacking your thread, but my thoughts may resonate among some.  

How thick is the felt you purchased ?   When I build my attic layout, I am contemplating green paint or something like your felt.  Since I operate post-war accessories, most of which have vibrator motors, I have had mixed results with them on soft surfaces. 

Dan Padova

 

"In the course of my life I have had to eat my words, and I must confess it was a wholesome diet"..........Winston Churchill

                                                                                                                                        

Hi Dan,

I do feel fortunate to have this space. It is half of the full basement. There is also a large crawl space that I had sealed. There was a little radon down there, so I had to put a mitigation system in. I also get a lot of ground water in the sump, so I had to install a generator to keep the sumps running if the power goes out. It paid for itself within 4 months when we lost power for 8 hours while we were out of town. ComEd gives me updates, which is nice when I’m away. 

The felt is pretty thick. Good point about the vibrating accessories! I plan to put my coal loader on the layout. I will need to cut the felt out from under it. 

Thanks for your post. You weren’t hijacking anything.

George

 

George S posted:

Hi Dan,

I do feel fortunate to have this space. It is half of the full basement. There is also a large crawl space that I had sealed. There was a little radon down there, so I had to put a mitigation system in. I also get a lot of ground water in the sump, so I had to install a generator to keep the sumps running if the power goes out. It paid for itself within 4 months when we lost power for 8 hours while we were out of town. ComEd gives me updates, which is nice when I’m away. 

The felt is pretty thick. Good point about the vibrating accessories! I plan to put my coal loader on the layout. I will need to cut the felt out from under it. 

Thanks for your post. You weren’t hijacking anything.

George

 

Good Thanksgiving morning George.  Thanks for your reply.  Let us know how your coal loader works.  When I build my layout, I may use felt instead of the green low pile carpeting I experimented with on my experimental layout.  The carpeting is nice but I found that drilling through it was difficult.  If I didn't separate the pile the drill would catch the nylon pile and wraps it around itself, causing a runner.  Cutting a section out of the carpet to allow an accessory to sit wasn't to hard but then the edges would tend to unravel.  If I decided to move an accessory, piecing the carpet back together wasn't always aesthedically pleasing.  

Felt, on the other hand has no pile and no pile to run.  Seems like piecing it back together might be easier too.  Could be the best solution.

Dan Padova

 

"In the course of my life I have had to eat my words, and I must confess it was a wholesome diet"..........Winston Churchill

                                                                                                                                        

The felt isn’t easy to cut. Fabric scissors might do a better job. My exacto knife doesn’t go through it too easily and you can’t drill through it. I am learning some tricks though. Cut it first where you are going to drill and open a space for the drill to go through without snagging. I’ll share more as I make more progress and run into the eventual problems.  It does go back together nicely without leaving a noticeable sign. I haven’t glued it down anywhere yet.

George

For cutting felt padding we always used a slotted blade carpet knife available where carpet installation tools are sold. 

WATCH IT ! 

You can cut a finger to the bone before you feel the incision.  Extremely sharp. 

Felt dulls the blade quickly, change the blade every 5' or so.  Cutting against a steel straight edge is best, the steel edge primary purpose is to  hold the felt steady & in place.

Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

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