I know there are some fans of "The Put" on the forum... this came across my Facebook feed this morning from the NY Transit Museum:

#TodayinHistory: On May 29, 1958, the New York Central Putnam Division commuter line made its final run between the Sedgwick Avenue station in the Bronx and the Brewster station in Putnam County, NY. Commonly called “the Put,” the line was decommissioned due to low ridership resulting from the line’s lack of both commuter parking and direct service to Grand Central Terminal, both of which were features of the parallel Harlem and Hudson Divisions. However, because there were no tunnels on the line, its tracks continued to be used by oversized freight trains until 1962, when the West Shore Railroad upgraded to accommodate “high and wide” freight traffic. Today, a remaining stub of track at Marble Hill is used for storage by Metro-North Railroad and much of the former roadbed has been converted to bike trails.

These #NYTMCollection photos were taken at the Sedgwick Avenue and Briarcliff Manor stations on the New York Central Putnam Division commuter line’s final run fifty-nine years ago. The original Briarcliff Manor station building reopened last year as a village community center dedicated to former mayor William J. Vescio.

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Original Post

59 years ago....I would be 5 years old in about a week. Starting Manhattan College in 71, I always saw a single track along the Major Deegan and I crossed over it on West 240th St. I basically ignored it.    Little did I know that less 20 years later, I would become obsessed with its history and would subsequently search out all I could learn about it.....

Peter

Well, it looks like the last passenger train on the Put was pulled by an Alco.  What a great way to celebrate the end, with a cloud of black smoke after each station stop.  

I am curious:

  • Was the Putnam Division signaled, semaphores perhaps?
  • Did it connect with a main line on both ends?
  • How long (in miles) was it?
  • What was the maximum authorized speed for passenger and for freight trains, respectively?
  • Was it really a Division with its own Superintendent. or was it just called a Division for a different reason?

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

Thanks, Peter.  I bookmarked the link to the pennyandkc - and, by the way, that answered almost all my questions, and the one remaining was answered by the map on Wikipedia.  What an interesting segment of NYC the Put was.

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

Stella D'Oro no longer uses rail service?  The company has passed through multiple corporate hands and the factory is closed?  Fie!  Fie!  A pox upon their houses!  May they choke on their biscotti!

THE PUT IS DEAD!  LONG LIVE THE PUT!

GENERAL NOTICE - Safety is of the first importance in the discharge of duty.  Obedience to the rules is essential to safety.  To enter or remain in the service is an assurance of willingness to obey the rules.

Putnam Division posted:

Ah! Stella Doro.....the smell of cookies coming through my car's heater on cold winter mornings is one of those sensations that evokes great memories.....

Peter

Could say the same thing about driving past the old Entenman's plant in Brentwood.

Bob

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

I used to drive the Deegan to work every day passing the remains of the Put.  There were still may of the tell-tales still in place.  Wasn't the Stella D'Oro building torn down or was that a Nabisco factory?

Is anyone young enough to remember the Silvercup bakery when it was still a bakery?  You could smell fresh bread halfway across the 59th Street bridge.  You have to go to the Rockland bakery if you want that smell today.

Dan

Peter/Putnam Division, Thanks for my inclusion! 

I grew up in Yonkers, NY and except for 10 years in Peekskill, NY, my wife and I are still here---approximately a mile and a half from The Old Put's ROW. Back in the 1970's, I played little league baseball at Cook Field (now Redmond Field). I would often be bored in the outfield except when an occasional short freight would head north, powered by an RS-3. 

Today, The Put is part of a fine rail trail system. In Westchester County, the southern portion is the South County Trailway and the northern section (as you can guess) is the North County Trailway. I still find it amazing that there are tell-tale poles, coal and spikes that you can find and even sections of rail (some of it still in Yonkers).  

http://parks.westchestergov.com/trailways

If you have any interest in The Put, I would recommend the Dan Gallo and Fred Kramer paperback, The Putnam Division. Also pictured by Peter are the 3 hardcover versions of The Old Put by Joe Schiavone. These are great additions for anyone interested in this line. Many photos were never seen before and came from private collections. When the initial release, "The Old Put" came out, there was a DVD that came with it called Walk the Put. In that DVD, Joe covers all stations from Van Cortlandt in the Bronx to Put Junction/Brewster. Brian Vangor did a superb job with the videography. As he walk along, Joe talks about the history of several stations. I talked about a few stops in Yonkers, too on the same DVD. It was a fun project. 

Tom 

Wow Gabe pressman is in his 90s? That really makes me feel old. I miss my days in the Bronx. Thanks for the memories.

Frank Ventura

choochoo@technologynation.us

 

 

... Another dedicated member of the model railroad quality control department. whenever I see quality, I try to control it...

 

Kent Loudon posted:

Am I correct?  I seem to recall reading that trains arriving in Brewster via the PUT were actually facing south on the Harlem Line.

You memory is fairly good.  The Put entered Brewster via a "Y" in the yard south of the station.  Geographically, the Harlem line ran north/south while, approaching Brewster, the Put was east/west, so a train could be facing south if it took that leg of the "Y".

Dan

Another item from my Facebook feed today... the description reads:

The last remaining track of the Putnam Line from the Bronx to Pleasantville.

 D9027B77-B57B-460F-91C1-9011A59DD2F5

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Attachments

Photos (1)

My wife works at the Bronx VA and I sometimes have jobs in Kingsbridge and there are 2 tell tales still up. One is just south of the Van Cortland exit with wires and all hanging and the other is just off Putnum st in the same area. I was just there on Monday and they were still up. There is actually track as Metro North uses it for contractor train and such.

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×