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Just had to point out that while watching the Sunday Night Football between the Jets and Raiders this evening, during the commercial break an Applebee's Holiday Combo Meals Ad was aired and it featured a O Gauge freight train running through a snowy Christmas Village at night with "Sleigh Ride" playing in the background.  Small steam locomotive (looked like a 0-4-0 at first glance) running on Lionel FasTrack.  Personally I would like if that Applebee's restaurant in the village is up for sale so that I can place it on my own Christmas layout .

Real pleasant commercial to ring in the holidays.  Never mind that Thanksgiving isn't here yet , but that's a topic for another day and time.

Anytime model trains are featured positively on televisions or movies to a mainstream audience is a good thing.

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Amfleet

I watched the game and saw the commercial -- I watched closely and saw the THIRD RAIL (as O gauge).

A few years ago there was a "real train" commercial for Coke, with the 1225 loco as its "star." Very well produced but as I understand it, Coke never sponsored it on network TV -- for a reason known only to the ad marketing guys.  Perhapsother hobbyists can comment on its use -- or why not.

Mike Mottler    LCCA 12394

Just had to point out that while watching the Sunday Night Football between the Jets and Raiders this evening, during the commercial break an Applebee's Holiday Combo Meals Ad was aired and it featured a O Gauge freight train running through a snowy Christmas Village at night with "Sleigh Ride" playing in the background.  Small steam locomotive (looked like a 0-4-0 at first glance) running on Lionel FasTrack.  Personally I would like if that Applebee's restaurant in the village is up for sale so that I can place it on my own Christmas layout .

Real pleasant commercial to ring in the holidays.  Never mind that Thanksgiving isn't here yet , but that's a topic for another day and time.

Anytime model trains are featured positively on televisions or movies to a mainstream audience is a good thing.

I am moving this to the photo/video forum.

…A few years ago there was a "real train" commercial for Coke, with the 1225 loco as its "star." Very well produced but as I understand it, Coke never sponsored it on network TV -- for a reason known only to the ad marketing guys.  Perhaps other hobbyists can comment on its use -- or why not.

I think you may be thinking of this video, done with the 765, not 1225.

This was produced without any involvement by Coca Cola. It was produced by Kelly Lynch as a “cool” idea. It’s too long to run on broadcast TV, where spots can’t be longer than 60 seconds. Now we even have FIVE second commercials running on YouTube.

Last edited by Rich Melvin

That first engine in the Coca Cola ad, with the orange (called red by some) stripe, the boy is holding, looks like a 1958 Lionel 249, plastic bodied 2-4-2 that came with a matching orange striped  Pennsylvania 1120T coal tender.  My engine and has a good metal 249-100 motor and two way E unit and is a good runner.  You see a postwar fan noticed the small engine.

I obtained this engine, for $10 at a garage sale in 1977, when I needed more engines for my homemade turntable and whisker tracks before the round house was built and to operate two loops of two trains on one track relayed systems the first Christmas of the layout in Kingston, Jamaica.

Charlie

Last edited by Choo Choo Charlie
@Rich Melvin posted:

I think you may be thinking of this video, done with the 765, not 1225.

This was produced without any involvement by Coca Cola. It was produced by Kelly Lynch as a “cool” idea. It’s too long to run on broadcast TV, where spots can’t be longer than 60 seconds. Now we even have FIVE second commercials running on YouTube.

Rich Melvin:

Thanks for the correction about the terrific "Coke commercial" -- with the 765 as the star of the show.  I want to add a ride on the 765 train to my bucket list.


Mike Mottler    LCCA 12395

Is the tender on backwards?

Yes, but I believe they did it deliberately in order to display the Applebee's logo properly.  The train is moving left to right, and the logo has an apple above the 'pp' in Applebee's - they needed to have the taller end of the tender to the rear in order to accommodate the logo.  Companies are very particular regarding how their logos are displayed, especially when they're paying a lot of money to produce and show a commercial.

In order to make the connection to the engine and couple to the rest of the train, it would have been necessary to remove the shell and reverse it, so they knew what they were doing.

Last edited by Mallard4468
@Mallard4468 posted:

Yes, but I believe they did it deliberately in order to display the Applebee's logo properly.  The train is moving left to right, and the logo has an apple above the 'pp' in Applebee's - they needed to have the taller end of the tender to the rear in order to accommodate the logo.  Companies are very particular regarding how their logos are displayed, especially when they're paying a lot of money to produce and show a commercial.

In order to make the connection to the engine and couple to the rest of the train, it would have been necessary to remove the shell and reverse it, so they knew what they were doing.

You could be right, but look carefully.  It seems to be a PRR loco, judging from an admittedly very brief look at the number plate on the smokebox.  So, might it not have a doghouse on top of the tender at its rear end (leading one to perceive that the tender may be backwards)?

Mike

If they can't hook up a toy train right why whould I trust them to make my food right ?

That train is absolutely “right” for the purpose for which it was intended. Applebees wanted their logo to appear correctly, so they turned the tender around so it would display properly. That makes it “right” for this commercial. They aren’t displaying a model train, they are selling food!

And remember this…99.99% of the people who watch this commercial won’t know the difference.

@Rich Melvin posted:

That train is absolutely “right” for the purpose for which it was intended. Applebees wanted their logo to appear correctly, so they turned the tender around so it would display properly. That makes it “right” for this commercial. They aren’t displaying a model train, they are selling food!

And remember this…99.99% of the people who watch this commercial won’t know the difference.

But what if they "lashed up" a side of fries with it?  Would it still be right?

Last edited by MartyE

You could be right, but look carefully.  It seems to be a PRR loco, judging from an admittedly very brief look at the number plate on the smokebox.  So, might it not have a doghouse on top of the tender at its rear end (leading one to perceive that the tender may be backwards)?

Mike

A doghouse is not the full width of the tender. Roadname makes no difference in an Applebee's commercial.

Accommodating the logo makes perfect sense.

On a side note however.  An incorrectly facing tender in a FS add means an immediate pass when looking for used equipment😉

@Rich Melvin posted:

I think you may be thinking of this video, done with the 765, not 1225.

This was produced without any involvement by Coca Cola. It was produced by Kelly Lynch as a “cool” idea. It’s too long to run on broadcast TV, where spots can’t be longer than 60 seconds. Now we even have FIVE second commercials running on YouTube.

THAT is an excellent commercial.

In addition, it so aptly illustrates the magnificence of super power steam!

Well done Fort Wayne RR Historical Society!!

Andre

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