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My beer is Reingold the dry beer. 

Think of Reingold whenever you by beer.

Its not bitter not sweet.

Extra dry flavor's Neat.

Won't you try extra dry Reingold beer?

 

Remember Mel Allan?

Broadcasting the Yankee games he would say,

Make the three ring sign and ask the man for Ballentine.

 

How about Bert and Harry Piel?

 

Cheers,

Nate

 

 

Wow what a lot of memories.....it is amazing how many breweries there once were in the NYC area, how many beers were brewed here. It is funny, today we have the 'craft beer' movement, but many of the beers we are mentioning were still made the way they were back in Europe. My maternal great grandfather was from Germany and he worked for Schaefer here in NY (timeframe would be late 19th century I would guess, my grandfather was born in 1880 I believe), and both my mother's parents worked for schaefer, it is where they met around 1920 or so. Rheingold was still the beer of the NY Mets when I was a kid, I hear it may be making something of a comeback (though like a lot of once great beers, like Schaeffer, I suspect it was bought by a bulk bottler like Heillman, and will be swill). 

 

Miss Rheingold was interesting. A friend of my father where he worked had a sister who had been Miss Rheingold, she ended up married to the guy who founder Peterson publishing (Hot Rod magazine among others). 

 

And since we were speaking of the Polo grounds and the subway, had to bring up another piece of family history. My mother and father were dating in 1951, both lived in the Bronx and used to take the subway downtown together each day. On the day of the Dodger-Giants playoff, they dared each other from the time they got on the subway to play hooky and go to the game....and that is what they did, called in 'sick', got tickets (different era!), and were there for Thompson's famous shot heard around the world (my mom was ecstatic, since she was a Giants fan, my dad just smiled, figuring the Yankees were gonna win another one (I was the one of those sad children, brought up in a house divided, my dad grew up in the Bronx (used to sneak into Yankee stadium as a kid during the depression), my mom was a Giants fan

 

 

Who did you root for bigkid ? Now and Then.

    When I was a kid I asked my mother for a Yankee hat like the other kids had on the block. She smacked me and said my uncle(a Brooklyn Dodger fan) would kill me if he heard that. From that day on I was a Met fan for life.

  When I worked at Sperry Gyroscope I would hear all the stories of the Polo grounds and Ebbetts field from the WW2 guys.

  I loved those stories and this thread brings them back to life.

Originally Posted by CHOO-CHOO MIKE:

Who did you root for bigkid ? Now and Then.

    When I was a kid I asked my mother for a Yankee hat like the other kids had on the block. She smacked me and said my uncle(a Brooklyn Dodger fan) would kill me if he heard that. From that day on I was a Met fan for life.

  When I worked at Sperry Gyroscope I would hear all the stories of the Polo grounds and Ebbetts field from the WW2 guys.

  I loved those stories and this thread brings them back to life.

Kind of a weird one, I am one of those people who is sort of dual allegiance. I was born after the Dodgers and Giants moved to the west coast, so through my mom I was a Mets fan but with my dad a Yankees fan, kind of hard not to pick that up, too. I would describe myself as more a Mets fan (why, I don't know, I must love self abuse, it is why I do software testing for a living *lol*),but I also still follow the Yankees somewhat . On the other hand to her dying day my mom said rooting for the Yankees was like rooting for the phone company *lol*.  

Funny story how I became a Yankee fan  !963 Bordens milk had coupons on milk containers  Collect 10 coupons and you got a free ticket to Shea to see the mets.  We scoured the neighborhood garbage cans and collected coupons  Went to 42 Met games that year with Mom who was die hard Dodger fan who became Met fan after the dodgers left.  Wouldn't you know the Mets lost 41 of those 42 games.  I said how can I like this team they suck.  Yankee fan ever since

Ben

 

The Borden offer goes back to the Brooklyn Dodgers days at Ebbets field. The coupons wee on milk containers and other Bordens dairy products such as the ice cream containers. I remember going to Ebbets field a few times on these tickets .

 

I can also remember the mets from those early shea days. When I was a Manhattan College student, a bunch of us cut classes and went to the first Met Home game ever . We got in General admission along the 1st base line and we were up at second row from the top. Mets played the Pirates that day. They lost 8-2 and Willie Stargell hit the first homerun ever at Shea stadium.

 

A couple of years later they were still pretty bad. In 1966, my brother had a pair of tickets for a Cardinal Game on a Saturday night. It was about the 6th inning and Mets were ahead about 8-1 . It was a cold evening So my Brother and I decided to head on home and finish the game on TV. Jack Hamilton had just come on to relieve for the mets. WE kived in Middle Village which was nearby and only a 10 minute car ride . By the time we got home, the Cardinals were leading 9-8 and it was still the same inning we left in. Oh those mets. 

I became a Yankee fan in 1954 when I was kid growing up in Brooklyn. My dad was a Dodger fan and my Uncle Jim was a Yankee fan.  In October, my mom went to the A&S department store on Fulton Street in Brooklyn to buy me a Dodger Jacket for my 7th birthday.  Turns out they didn't have my size in a Dodger jacket but did have it in a Yankee jacket.  Mom, being Mom, didn't know the first thing about baseball but wanted to make sure I had a jacket that fit properly so she purchased the Yankee jacket.  You can imagine my dad's surprise when he came home from work that day and saw me wearing the Yankee jacket.  He laughed, took me by the hand, and we walked the two blocks to Uncle Jim's.  When we arrived at my uncle's apartment dad said to him, "look what you did to my son".  They both laughed and made that birthday something that I will never forget.  From that day on I was a Yankee fan.

 

 

Strolling on a Sunday afternoon

 

1207_519909944698387_1202161596_n

 

Cant't get away from that Rheingold beer

 

161 3

 

Imagine having these fans today  There would be all kinds of signs to keep your head away from the blades  Those tubular things are heaters

 

049

 

Ninth ave and 66th street

 

9th ave 66st

 

New Utrect ave construction

5aveL_ramp[1]

 

View from the Flatiron building at 23 st

 

23 flatiron

 

1980's New York  Big changes since then

 

110 - 1985

 

 

110

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Ben,

The photo is a promotion by the IRT co. Introducing the experimental " noiseless and ventilated " cars being tried out. The LO-V cars were equipped with blower motor ventilated fans enclosed in squirrel cages as seen mounted in the roof. They also had rubber mats in the vestibules covering the steel diamond plate floors. The storm doors were modified with rubber end panels similar to the side doors. The gentleman in the center wearing the white suit is the infamous Frank Hedley. He was in charge of the operation of the IRT. There was a 10 car train refered to as the "Blower Cars". The experiment was a failure and the blowers and the mats were removed. The rubber storm door modification were left in place and the cars finished theit days in that configuration. As far as the question about what the men have their feet on covering the heaters i do not know. My guess is either a buffer to contain the noise coming from under the car through the heater vents or a foot rest. Certainly if used in the winter they would prevent heat from entering the car and would have to be removed in the winter. (not practical)  So, your guess is as good as mine.

 

 

Originally Posted by LIRR Steamer:

Ben

 

 

I can also remember the mets from those early shea days. When I was a Manhattan College student, a bunch of us cut classes and went to the first Met Home game ever . We got in General admission along the 1st base line and we were up at second row from the top. Mets played the Pirates that day. They lost 8-2 and Willie Stargell hit the first homerun ever at Shea stadium.

The first Met home game ever, would've been at the Polo Grounds, not Shea.

Richie

Last edited by Richard Cuozzo

The lineups shown was the starting lineup for both teams . For the dodgers, i recognize the numbers....Junior Gilliam at 2nd base, Pewee Reese at shortstop,Duke snider in centerfield, Jackie Robinson at 3rd base, Gil Hodges at 1st Base, Sandy Amoros in Left Field, Carl Furillo in Right field, Roy Campanella catching. Sal "the barber"  Maglie pitched a 5 hitter for the Dodgers. It was not good enough on that day.  Mantle " The Mick" gave the Yankees the only run needed. The last batter for the Dodgers was Dale Mitchell pinch hitting for Maglie. Larsen caught Mitchell for a third strike to end the game. It is the one perfect game in World Series history. 

 

Campanella was a Lionel guy having a train layout in his home.

 

I'll let a Yankee Fan fill us in on the Yankee Lineup

All the talk about baseball, in the 60's we would go to a Ranger Hockey game at the old garden (50th and 8th) and get nosebleed seats for $0.50. Round trip subway from Brooklyn, $.30, plus admission and a $.25 Coke, watching professional Hockey for $1.05 on a Friday night. I went to a Dallas Stars game last night, discount seat (they stink this year)

$35, Train from Bedford (on the Fort Worth side) $2.50, beer $8.00. Yes, the Stars lost.

 

Worked on my layout today and wished I could afford a good subway set. No school buses to High School, just the old GG line.

More on the Westchester Ave station of the NYW&B.

 

This is a pic I copied from Ben some time ago looking at the 6 crossing the Bronx River over Westchester Avenue.  The view is from the Whitlock Avenue station

 

 

Bronx 6 Westchester & Boston

 

 

The next is an overhead from Google Maps......along the river the abandoned Transit Ready Mix concrete plant has been turned into a park.

 

 

Scan

 

 

The station is the building whose roof has the words "Westchester Ave" on top. The area to the right (east) is Concrete Plant Park which borders the river.

 

Peter

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I went to Chelsea Voc High School  in lower Manhattan from 1957 to 1960. I would take the "E" or "F" train from Queens Plaza  to Spring St then walk a few blocks to school. The subway ride was great, especially in the morning when the trains were packed. I remember it well. I now have 7 sets of MTH subway cars. I love them all.

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