Skip to main content

Not being a tech. Guy I just had to ask this of you technical whizz kids. Could one take an old pre war engine from the 50's and convert new technology into it ? I was looking at the engines my dad ran and thought that would be something to see. Old with a new soul.

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

One of the first ones I ever did was modify my first 2035 that I bought in 2017 getting back into the hobby from a small shop (Schultz's) in Dayton Ohio and in 2018 updated it to ERR AC commander in the tender and railsounds using an MTH tether harness. I even wired the original coil coupler to TMCC rather than shoe.

Chuff annoyed me in trying to get a good trigger (I did not like tender axle driven) and eventually my solution was drill the backside of the front fireman side powdered metal driving wheel and insert a tiny magnet with superglue. It lined up to a matching hole in the aluminum frame of the motor where I also superglued a Hall Effect sensor.

My other AC commander install was into an early FM Trainmaster 2321 also with Railsounds. Someone left the orginal horn D cell battery so the holder and frame took some corrosion.

Another one I did was the FARR Great Northern- again, using an MTH 10 pin tether wiring for a simple plug in system.

Chuff annoyed me in trying to get a good trigger (I did not like tender axle driven) and eventually my solution was drill the backside of the front fireman side powdered metal driving wheel and insert a tiny magnet with superglue. It lined up to a matching hole in the aluminum frame of the motor where I also superglued a Hall Effect sensor.

Guess you hadn't discovered the Chuff-Generator.

Guess you hadn't discovered the Chuff-Generator.

On a 2035 motor?

Lionel Train Part 2035-100 Incomplete Motor Assembly

using this info from you https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...1#155434570871005781



For the record absolutely, I have used the heck out of some of your chuff generators- mainly on a MTH engine when converting to TMCC ERR and using a matching Super Chuffer.

Attachments

Images (1)
  • mceclip0

I converted Lionel's 8580 Illinois Central F3 with dual Pullmor motors to digital using one of ERR's conversion kits. These conversions are easy and very straightforward (I don't put smoke units in diesel units).

Even though it was successful I wasn't happy with the engine's performance. This was not an issue with the ERR kit but with the Pullmor motors.

I eventually sent the engine off to Timko Repair; who did a fantastic job replacing the AC motors with DC can motors. Now the F3 runs as  smooth as ever.

@Junior posted:

Even though it was successful I wasn't happy with the engine's performance. This was not an issue with the ERR kit but with the Pullmor motors.

I eventually sent the engine off to Timko Repair; who did a fantastic job replacing the AC motors with DC can motors. Now the F3 runs as  smooth as ever.

Oddly, I had a different experience.  I have the original Lionel Phantom.  It came with one motor, and it's performance was anemic, to say the least!  It had trouble on Atlas track pulling the four stock passenger cars, never mind the two extras I bought for it!  I added a second motor, and also upgraded to the ERR AC Commander from the LCRU.  It's like a different locomotive!  It has great low speed performance, and has WAY better pulling power with two motors.  The 100 speed steps really helps at low speed, I was considering a DC motor transplant, but after this upgrade, that idea was abandoned.

Improving the Lionel Phantom Locomotive

Lionel's diesels, including your 8580, use back-drivable gears.  So the motors in a dual-motored unit can actually "help" each other.  For example: when one Pullmor motor's armature is "stuck" in the node between the poles, chances are that the other motor's armature may not be.  So the second motor rotates and nudges the whole train.  Because the wheels can turn the motor, this releases the load on the first motor.  So now it also rotates.  If you accept this premise, a Lionel diesel with two vertical motors is benefitting from about 18 "power pulses" per inch.  This compares favorably to a 5-pole can motor.  If both motors are in good working condition, it should be able to maintain about 600 rpm, or a steady 9-10 mph on level track.  If one motor starts way before the other, something is wrong and you need to troubleshoot that to restore performance.  That's just about as good as any can-motored diesel could do before the advent of speed control.

Conversely, most diesels with twin vertical "can" motors do NOT have back-drivable gears.  The gears are self-locking.  Thus one motor cannot "help" the other, at least not very much.  So you might see some bucking and surging of the individual trucks when the loco first starts moving.  On those trains, I bet that you could get a smoother start, and maybe a slower minimum speed, if you observed which motor was more reluctant and performed a radical motor-ectomy!

Last edited by Ted S

I saw an article on Google that stated homes in the USA post war , that some were AC and others DC so lionel made the products to run on both. If that is a fact then why does it make any difference what system you use?

I think I'd have to see that Google reference, by 1945, there were no DC power being supplied on the power grid in the USA.  The only reason Lionel made DC stuff was to be cheap, it cost less than making it run on the more universal AC transformers.

@CurtisH posted:

I just did an inspection on a house that sold and it was all DC voltage. Also our friend in Morristown NJ , her father (I believed he lived in Schnecksville PA) had an ALL DCC voltage house.

On that note, about 25 years ago I inspected a loft industrial building in Chicago that had DC elevators in it.  The building has since been converted to loft offices, so I would guess the freight elevators are either gone or converted to operate on AC. That is still not the craziest elevator story...

I recall seeing a different loft industrial building that was constructed in the late 1870s, shortly after the Great Chicago Fire, which still had its original bird-cage elevator with hand operated controls.  That was a hoot!   

Last edited by Nation Wide Lines

Add Reply

Post
This forum is sponsored by Lionel, LLC
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×