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I also need the darker Navy blue color for the bottom of my 263E baby blue comet lower frame- Anyone know what is the exact matching dark navy blue color & does it come in a paint pen? Also what do i use a brush or tooth pick for a touch up? i only have a little nick & do not need a sprayer...Any help on this subject is greatly appreciated...Thanks!

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  • MTH baby blue comet- 10-1062-1: Need a color match for bottom Navy blue on frame of engine
Last edited by Sal V

To Sal V  I have used Krylon Gloss Navy for overall complete chassis paint. Comes as close as I have found. I am not a spray bomb person but times it comes in and works. As to Pat, Collector Colors are a paint available to match toy train colors as stated sold through Hennings.  I have used it to some success and wish to leave it at that.  I am looking for options that possibly others have used with  success.  Thank you all for your response. Some time ago I had the lighter blue paint matched at a automotive store and it was great. This chain paint supply no longer will paint match as the person had retired. It is also Very expensive now. The last time I bought a just the activator for single stage auto paint 1/2 pint cost 56.00. Not to mention what the paint cost. If you go base coat clear coat you can only guess what it will cost now. Special colors like on my Miata it was 75.00 5 years ago for 1/2 pint of base coat!   Thank You for all your response.  Roy O

Ahh,…ok gotcha,….now I see what you’re cooking,…I’ve never used rattle cans when doing tinplate anyways, I’ve always used DuPont base/clear,…however, as you’ve mentioned, it’s expensive!!….but I’ve only been ever asked to do high end tinplate such as standard gauge 385’s 400’s etc…..where the workpiece demanded a better than factory finish naturally modern day urethanes are way beyond the luster & finish of the old lacquers and enamels used by toy mfrs. way back when,…..I’d suggest you find another auto body paint supply store that still packages arosol paints ,….they still do exist…….thing is I buy clear by the drums so, for me even buying a taste of a base coat color isn’t that big of a deal,….I have the reducers, hardeners and what not on hand,……one of the perks of running a body shop….😉…you’re kinda stuck between a rock & hard place doing a 263 for O scale ……

Pat

Last edited by harmonyards

Harmonyards finally somebody understands.  You are right high end finish is base clear. I would rather do nothing than mess up a old tinplate with what I refer to as spray bombs. I have most materials (not like a body shop) just lacking a good color base coat. Dont even think about cost factor, availability is my issue now. Even at that, blue comet blue comes in many different shades depending on year.  I plan on a 263 if I can find the right color. Would consider even a single stage of quality. Thanks for the responce.  Having a body shop is Big as you probably know, even at that, cost for materials has gone up, you can pass that on in repair bill.  Roy O

@Roy O posted:

Harmonyards finally somebody understands.  You are right high end finish is base clear. I would rather do nothing than mess up a old tinplate with what I refer to as spray bombs. I have most materials (not like a body shop) just lacking a good color base coat. Dont even think about cost factor, availability is my issue now. Even at that, blue comet blue comes in many different shades depending on year.  I plan on a 263 if I can find the right color. Would consider even a single stage of quality. Thanks for the responce.  Having a body shop is Big as you probably know, even at that, cost for materials has gone up, you can pass that on in repair bill.  Roy O

Well, if you have some materials, like clear & hardener, you’d be surprised how little of an amount of certain colors you can buy,….complex colors with flakes and pearls, sometimes half pint is minimum, but a pastel like Blue Comet blue you can buy in very small quantities ready to spray, in other words, the paint store will mix the color, and add the reducer for a product ready to dump in a gun and spray,….( strain it first) ….I did a 400E like that in black,  just barely mixed enough to do the job,….like less than 1/4 pint of color,…that’s only like 20-25 bucks worth of material before clear…….I’d check with your auto paint supply store and see what kind of materials are available, ….some sell clear coats as well, in quantities less than qt. size,…..I’m not a fan of single stage on anything …….base/clear to me is so much more vibrant,….and durable,….

Pat

Our paints were originally matched to 'VIRGIN' pieces that Carl & Lou Shaw were kind enough to help me with. We opened sealed boxes of Lionel cars, engines etc. stored in the upper floors of Madison Hardware. These units were color matched as to original color gloss, The colors were then sprayed onto a heavy gloss paper and stored in manila envelopes for future reference. Until recently, we always canned  ( 1/2 pint  ) cans, a gallon at a time. We have just reduced this to 1 qt. at a time, since not as much restoration is being done.  We "REMATCH" once a year our paint batches to the original , just for color accuracy. Paint over 3 years old has a tendency to produce a 'sand' finish due to the pigments used in yellows & reds.  That is why we only make a qt. at a time. If anybody has a problem, we always try to correct. We have had trains painted 30 years ago that the "EXPERTS" claimed were 'virgin original' Lionel items.  We do our best.   Harry 

Harry,

Thank you for that information. It helps and makes sense.

Not to co op this thread, but I have a question on how you go about matching not only the color, but the original gloss. Did different railroads vary the sheen on their paint mixtures? For example, was a black steam engine purchased by Pennsylvania RR the same, as say the Virginian? Was a high gloss finish the norm for new equipment?

Thank you again.

Jerry

What an interesting discussion.  I mix my own, but have an awful time with chrome yellows.  There is an outfit in town that can do those - $75 minimum.

I am just guessing, but I would think that Henning's colors are far more cost-efficient - but $ will get you what you need from an auto paint store with the proper analyzer.

@jpc posted:

Harry,

Thank you for that information. It helps and makes sense.

Not to co op this thread, but I have a question on how you go about matching not only the color, but the original gloss. Did different railroads vary the sheen on their paint mixtures? For example, was a black steam engine purchased by Pennsylvania RR the same, as say the Virginian? Was a high gloss finish the norm for new equipment?

Thank you again.

Jerry

Jerry, …I can answer this for you,…when the railroads submitted a plan for a build, often the factory had paint samples for the purchasing agent to preview before application. Level of gloss depended on what the builder had available for the railroad to purchase,…..usually came down to a choice between a lacquer or an enamel finish,….back then, a lacquer finish held a deeper gloss than an enamel, and in a short time period, an enamel would begin to “ chalk” or dull out fairly quickly…….but if we’re discussing steam locomotives, many chose a lacquer finish….subsequently as well, newly machined rods and valve gear would be treated to triple coats of clear lacquer when new, and the lacquer applied over the bare steel….this not only was an appearance enhancement, it also served to let mechanics and inspectors check more easily for cracks or defects, that would otherwise be possibly hidden from a colored paint,….

Pat

Our #675 Satin Black will pertain to most post war steam engines, and probably half of the pre war, such as a version of the 259, 221, 249 & 1835. Others like the black 400, 392, 257, 258, 261 &262 have a gloss finish, but NOT high gloss.  Most of our pre war colors are a medium gloss as to match most original present day finishes.  I believe 100% on our finishes. I have for instance a #6462 green gondola that we sprayed one half of to check color match. It is very difficult to say what is original or where it was over sprayed.  For those using our paint, I found what is left over can be preserved for several more years by tucking a piece of saran wrap on top of the remining paint and up against the can innards, sealing out the air in the can.    Thank you all.  Harry 

Our paints were originally matched to 'VIRGIN' pieces that Carl & Lou Shaw were kind enough to help me with. We opened sealed boxes of Lionel cars, engines etc. stored in the upper floors of Madison Hardware. These units were color matched as to original color gloss, The colors were then sprayed onto a heavy gloss paper and stored in manila envelopes for future reference. Until recently, we always canned  ( 1/2 pint  ) cans, a gallon at a time. We have just reduced this to 1 qt. at a time, since not as much restoration is being done.  We "REMATCH" once a year our paint batches to the original , just for color accuracy. Paint over 3 years old has a tendency to produce a 'sand' finish due to the pigments used in yellows & reds.  That is why we only make a qt. at a time. If anybody has a problem, we always try to correct. We have had trains painted 30 years ago that the "EXPERTS" claimed were 'virgin original' Lionel items.  We do our best.   Harry 

Harry...In my case I just need a tiny nick on the dark blue side of my MTH 10-1062-1 263e baby blue comet-

Any suggestions for a minor touch up & is there a proper technique to use?

@Sal V have you checked out the Krylon Gloss Navy that @Roy O had suggested? How does it match up with the existing color? Would you be satisfied with that color and the visibility of it when corrected? What does the nick look like? The question I would have to ask myself is, am I running this train, do my kids run my trains or is this a shelf queen? If I’m not happy with the Krylon match and still want to touch up the nick I would invest in a can of Henning’s Collector Colors. Check the match than make my decision to leave the character alone on the engine and just enjoy or attempt the touch up with a appropriate size brush.  

@Sal V posted:

so what technique do i use & what prpoer color goes with my MTH 10-1062-1 Baby Blue Comet 263e Engine ( The Dark Navy Blue frame part) -I`m new to the hobby & not shure off where to begin...any info is greatly appreciated...

Sal, from reading the above clues, it sounds like you just want to do some minor touch ups??……for that kind of job, I would get a small bottle of testors navy blue model paint, and a small jar of black model paint ( both gloss enamels ) …..see how close the navy blue is right out the jar,….if it’s too light, put a small amount of the blue on a old plastic lid, or whatever you have laying around, and add a drop of black at a time off of a toothpick and mix the two until you make a “touch up paint” that makes you happy,…..so in other words, you’re using the black to tint the blue,…..you may also ask Harry Hennings how small of an amount he sells,…he might have small amounts available, however, I’d probably do the exact same process as I’ve mentioned above beings Harry’s paints are designed around original Prewar tinplate, and god only knows how exact MTH’s colors are to their prewar counterparts,…….

tip: don’t use a paint brush to apply to a chip once you get your color desire,……use the tip of a needle, and “fill in” the chipped area to the surrounding edges,….enamel is a funny critter,…..let cure for at least 4-5 days depending on how big the chip is, then apply a light spray of furniture polish to a microfiber rag, and buff the area by hand to polish in a blend,….

Pat

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