I use Castrol SuperClean, full strength in a Spackling trough.  It is perfectly safe on plastic, and I typically strip Die Cast Postwar loco bodies.  When stripping Die Cast, it usually only takes 6-8 hours of soaking.  Scrubbed with an old toothbrush, and rinsed in warm soapy water.  Recommend using latex gloves, as it pulls the moisture out of your skin, but is otherwise safe.  I have used it exclusively for stripping, for last 5 years, with great results.

TeleDoc posted:

I use Castrol SuperClean, full strength in a Spackling trough.  It is perfectly safe on plastic, and I typically strip Die Cast Postwar loco bodies.  When stripping Die Cast, it usually only takes 6-8 hours of soaking.  Scrubbed with an old toothbrush, and rinsed in warm soapy water.  Recommend using latex gloves, as it pulls the moisture out of your skin, but is otherwise safe.  I have used it exclusively for stripping, for last 5 years, with great results.

When I did a Google search on Castrol Super Clean, I came up with the product described at the following link: https://www.walmart.com/ip/SuperClean-Tough-Task-Cleaner-Degreaser-1-gal/23752162?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=3481&adid=22222222227017227582&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=58368785808&wl4=pla-63481317305&wl5=9007926&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=23752162&veh=sem&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwoav_6eu5QIVTD0MCh3tDAMwEAYYASABEgJ4fPD_BwEhttps://www.walmart.com/ip/SuperClean-Tough-Task-Cleaner-Degreaser-1-gal/23752162?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=3481&adid=22222222227017227582&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=58368785808&wl4=pla-63481317305&wl5=9007926&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=23752162&veh=sem&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwoav_6eu5QIVTD0MCh3tDAMwEAYYASABEgJ4fPD_BwE

Is this degreasing product that to which you refer?

Thank you.

Randy Harrison,

President of the:

Great Northeastern Railway

The Standard Railroad of the Basement



 

 

Randy, Yes, that is what I use exclusively, on all my stripping. As I mentioned, I bought a cheap plastic Spackling trough, from Home Depot, also available at other home improvement stores.  I put the loco or rolling stock inside, and fill with SuperClean, so it is covered.  Most stripping I’ve done this way, take 6-8 hours of soaking, and scrubbed with old toothbrush.  After strip, I rinse it under warm soapy water, then let dry thoroughly.  When I am ready to paint, I use latex gloves, and wipe it down with isopropyl alcohol, immediately before painting.  Most items get primed, then your choice of color is sprayed, in light even coats.  My usual choice of paint is either Krylon, or automotive DupliColor, if the shade can match closely.  Others may recommend Rustoleum, but I have nothing but grief with Rustoleum.  It’s your choice on the paint, you use.

Thanks for all of the great information. I have a passenger coach that i painted and the paint cracked while drying looking like alligator hide.  I have to get it off and start over. Your advice is a GREAT help!

Randy Harrison,

President of the:

Great Northeastern Railway

The Standard Railroad of the Basement



 

 

Lionelski posted:

This is what 6 hours in powdered Tide and hot water did.

This car had its factory finish and a brushed on coat of paint on top. Works equally well on plastic. A lot less toxic that brake fluid or commercial paint strippers too.

stripped standard gauge

What ratio of Tide to water is optimum? Also, does the car need to be scrubbed with a tooth brush at the end of the 6 hour soak?

Thank you.

Randy Harrison,

President of the:

Great Northeastern Railway

The Standard Railroad of the Basement



 

 

Randy Harrison posted:

What ratio of Tide to water is optimum? Also, does the car need to be scrubbed with a tooth brush at the end of the 6 hour soak?

Nah, just airbrush on some fabric softener and you're good.  

Mitch

It's crackers to give a rozzer the dropsy in snide!

 

Remember, SCROUNGE!

I use a product called LA's TOTALLY AWESOME it's available in dollar stores...use a high concentration with hot tap water...just did a PW Santa Fe shell,it took all of the paint off..down to the yellow plastic...let it sit over night,reapply if necessary.... 

KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON...W.S.CHURCHILL

 

Joe Krasko LCCA 17199

Randy Harrison posted:
Lionelski posted:

This is what 6 hours in powdered Tide and hot water did.

This car had its factory finish and a brushed on coat of paint on top. Works equally well on plastic. A lot less toxic that brake fluid or commercial paint strippers too.

stripped standard gauge

What ratio of Tide to water is optimum? Also, does the car need to be scrubbed with a tooth brush at the end of the 6 hour soak?

Thank you.

About a cup for 2-3 gallons of water, the hotter the better for metal, not too hot for plastic or it WILL warp.

Maybe just a little touch-up with a toothbrush in tight spaces

TeleDoc posted:

My usual choice of paint is either Krylon, or automotive DupliColor, if the shade can match closely.  Others may recommend Rustoleum, but I have nothing but grief with Rustoleum.  It’s your choice on the paint, you use.

Same experience here. I've found Krylon to be much better than Rustoleum - better nozzle, goes on smoother, dries much faster. I'll have to check out DupliColor.

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