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Not sure if this is the right place for this but will try anyway.

I have a hopper car which I tried to re paint. Stupidly I didn't remove the original lettering first. Of course it shows through the new paint. So the problem is: How do I remove the paint from this thing or would it be better to find another hopper and start again? Now I don't remember what paint I used to spray it. Possibly Rustoleum painters touch.

Thanks for any ideas you may have.

Jay

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At this point you will need to strip the paint. In the future if you plan on doing some re lettering or re numbering. If you have access to an air compressor. Passche makes an air eraser. Similar to an airbrush but it shoots a mild abrasive. Works well at removing lettering. It does go slow so it’s best to start with a car with simple graphics. Usually I end up repainting. But seeing the lettering is gone you can get by with a thin coat. For just changing out a number. I usually mask the area off and most times just a shot of gloss is needed to add the new number.

@trainman129 posted:

Not sure if this is the right place for this but will try anyway.

I have a hopper car which I tried to re paint. Stupidly I didn't remove the original lettering first. Of course it shows through the new paint. So the problem is: How do I remove the paint from this thing or would it be better to find another hopper and start again? Now I don't remember what paint I used to spray it. Possibly Rustoleum painters touch.

Thanks for any ideas you may have.

Jay

You do know if you are looking for a prototypical look the lettering through the new paint would be spot on.

here is a photo of a Northfolk Southern with the original owners name showings underneath.

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Melgar, Another little lesson on why 44 tonners are named that way. The NH kept a 44 tonner in Meriden in the NH yard  off of North Colony Street that switched the Suzio Quarry out on WestField Rd and the International Silver Company Rolling Mill and some smaller industries. If my memory is correct, that engine was orange and hunter green. I also noticed for the first time, the Jenkins Valve sign on your layout. I think Jenkins went the way of many of the major valve manufacturers being bought up by Crane Valve and then Crane transferred all the casting work to mills in China. The final assembly of the valves would take place here in the states so they could meet the "Made in America" requirement. There are still many steam plants running today with Jenkins valves from that plant.
Arnie, When I first moved to upstate New York, I became a fan of the O&W because it ran through most of my sales territory. That was in 1978. I have some NYO&W papers I retrieved from the abandoned Summitville Station which was actually in the valley below the Highview  Tunnel which was the passage through the Shawangunk Mountains and much higher in elevation than the station. I have enjoyed visiting much of the old right-of-way which since 1978 has fading away.   Bill

I'm a 91% alcohol bath fan.  But wholly cow that stuff quadrupled in price.  Use to buy a bottle for .99, now it's $4 a bottle.  I typically need 5 -6 bottles depending on the car I'm doing.  MTH cars need 24-48 hours and a light toothbrush will bring off all of the paint.  I did some Bauchmann caboose and the paint came off in 10 minutes.

IMG_20200402_171618134IMG_20200404_124203328 [1)

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Last edited by Ron045

Jay,  I have used with success a product found at the dollar store called "Awesome".  Cost is $1.00 for 32 oz. bottle. It may have gone up to a $1.25 now.  Still a good deal.  Depending on how much time you want to give the parts, it may take a few days.  I have removed older post war paint and even "Testor's".  Just soak for a few days, then I use a sharpened popsicle stick as a scraper and an old tooth brush. It does not leave oil on the plastic but I always wash the parts in warm soapy water after.  You may have to do this a couple of times but there is no smell to the product and if you get it on yourself it washes off with soap and water. It does not have a solvent or alcohol base.  I received some 1960 postwar freight cars that a kid had spray painted "Testor's" dark blue.  After soaking them for a few days and using the tooth brush the blue came off but left the underneath heat stamped lettering in tact, a bonus.  If you can, always try a small part inside to be sure that the stuff will not damage the plastic and use rubber gloves to keep it off of you, and keep it away from children.  Will only cost you a $1.00 or so to give it a try.  I have not tried it on any of the newer paints on the market.  It is also used as a cleaner for many things.  I have used it to remove mildew stains from our RV awning.  Good Luck!     

I've been trying various methods of paint removal from plastic over the years.  Scale Coat had a paint remover that worked fairly well but it cost an arm and a leg, plus now SC is gone.  I tried the brake fluid method, leaving the shell of a Lionel F7B soaking in it for a month... it took the decals off, period.

I'm now trying Purple Power which was recommended in another related thread.  The B unit was soaking for 3 days without noticeable effect so I left it over the weekend and we'll see.

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