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DSCN4991 90 chef and steward

Accomodations for the chef and steward.  Rather cozy.

DSCN4992 90 gas controls

This is the cabinet work to put the gas(light) lines and valves out of sight. It also holds the tool used to light the interior lamps and a wood pole for opening and closing the windows in the clerestory.

DSCN4993 90 brass railing

Brass hand rails span the glass in both passageways.

DSCN4994 90 kitchen

Kitchen with copper counter top.

DSCN4995 90 dining roo0m ceilingDSCN4996 90 dining table

Dining room with original table and chairs. Pat Cudzilo (in the blue shirt) was our guide,very knowledgable.  He knows this car like the back of his hand.  The mirror which caught the flash when pulled out from the top becomes a 'Murphy' type  bed. The fireplace is below the larger mirror.  I took the blonde to dinner.

DSCN4997 90 passageway bedrooms

Dining room looking forward along the right side of the car..

DSCN4998 90 only SectionDSCN4999 90 sectionDSCN5000 90 berth mechanism

These six photos are of the only 'Section' in the car.  I tried to get a decent picture of the mechanism used to hold the upper berths in place.

DSCN5002 90 upper berthDSCN5003 90 lower berthDSCN5004 90 berth ladder

DSCN5001 90 only bedroom

Mrs. Flagler's bedroom with entry to the bath at the picture's left.  Padding along the wall for comfort.DSCN5005 90 obsvn roomDSCN5006 90 observn roomDSCN5007 90 obsvn roomDSCN5008 90 obsvn ceiling

Rear room of this private car.  Furniture reflects Florida influence. 90% of the car is original

DSCN5011 90 underDSCN5012 90 underDSCN5013 89 underDSCN5014 90 trucks .

DSCN5009 90 trucksDSCN5010 90 under

Car is located (inside a building constructed for it) in Monon, Indiana.   The guides spend about thirty minutes with you inside the car.  It is difficult (read impossible) to absorb it all.. Constructed in the 1890s for Mr. Flagler's third wife, they didn't spare the horses.  Estimated cost (in 2022 dollars) is north of one million.   Later, John

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  • DSCN4991 90 chef and steward
  • DSCN4992 90 gas controls
  • DSCN4993 90 brass railing
  • DSCN4994 90 kitchen
  • DSCN4995 90 dining roo0m ceiling
  • DSCN4996 90 dining table
  • DSCN4997 90 passageway bedrooms
  • DSCN4998 90 only Section
  • DSCN4999 90 section
  • DSCN5000 90 berth mechanism
  • DSCN5001 90 only bedroom
  • DSCN5002 90 upper berth
  • DSCN5003 90 lower berth
  • DSCN5004 90 berth ladder
  • DSCN5005 90 obsvn room
  • DSCN5006 90 observn room
  • DSCN5007 90 obsvn room
  • DSCN5008 90 obsvn ceiling
  • DSCN5009 90 trucks
  • DSCN5010 90 under
  • DSCN5011 90 under
  • DSCN5012 90 under
  • DSCN5013 89 under
  • DSCN5014 90 trucks
Last edited by Rich Melvin
Original Post

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@dkdkrd posted:

Wow!  Only 4.5 hours away!  Gotta see this 'up close and personal', for sure!

Is there a floor plan for the car?  Can't quite put that together from the several photos, official museum site.

Nice ride to Key Largo in its day, eh what?

I haven't seen a floor plan, perhaps this may help.  Entering from the front of the car, the vestibule is enclosed. Bear left and you face the cabinet with the gas controls and tool storage area.  The passageway along the right side of the car(picture's left side) passes the chef and porter half section and the kitchen(also storage areas outside the kitchen for non-perishable items), Full width dining room.  The rear passageway is on the car's left and passes the misses' bedroom w/bath. Aft of the only bedroom is the Section with seating and sleeping accomodations for four people.  Rearmost is the solarium/parlor/lounge or whatever she called that area.  Single center door to the observation car's deck.  Hope this helps a little.

Just under two hours from Lansing, Illinois.  Route 35 and Route 421 are very good roads.

Respectfully,  John

Last edited by rattler21

Yellowstone Vern - 19th century Pullman passenger trucks were all wood beamed!  When full steel trucks became the norm would be around, say, 1910 (best guess).  The Burlington Route used wood-beam trucks on their waycars into the 1970's. Believe they all used oak, which is quite sturdy.  The beams were wood but the attached hardware was iron or steel.

Last edited by mark s
@mark s posted:

Yellowstone Vern - 19th century Pullman passenger trucks were all wood beamed!  When full steel trucks became the norm would be around, say, 1910 (best guess).  The Burlington Route used wood-beam trucks on their waycars into the 1970's. Believe they all used oak, which is quite sturdy.  The beams were wood but the attached hardware was iron or steel.

I did not know that. In fact, I know very little about heavyweight Pullmans. Thanks, Mark. 👍

Martin...

Good video!  Enough of a floor plan to clarify the photos.  Thanks!!  Really curious about the #90 vs. #91?

And, boy!...the trackwork that the engine and cars are rolling through makes my layout's trackwork look pretty good in comparison!!

Besides the extraordinary craftsmanship in everything interior, it always amazes me how they pack so much accommodation and feature into a car. 

And the carpeting, etc.??...Keeping it clean??  The common personal-use electric vacuum cleaner wasn't really available for another 30 years after this car was built!  Not sure whether the steward's job was glamorous or taxing.  I sincerely doubt Mrs. Flagler wielded the cleaning/washing/dusting chores when on the (rail)road.

Yepper!  If ya' got it, may as well flaunt it!

Model this interior?  Talk about a 3D printing tour de force opportunity!

@dkdkrd posted:

Martin...

Good video!  Enough of a floor plan to clarify the photos.  Thanks!!  Really curious about the #90 vs. #91?

Besides the extraordinary craftsmanship in everything interior, it always amazes me how they pack so much accommodation and feature into a car.



I too am amazed by the stowage of items.  Can you imagine what the chef must do to prepare a four course evening meal every day the lady is on board?  The planning, storing, cooking and presentation was in itself a work of art.  John

Last edited by rattler21

John M.

Decades ago when I lived and worked in Florida (at WJCT-FM in Jacksonville) I visited the Flagler car in Palm Beach.  Impressive and extravagant.  We'll likely never see new RR cars made like that one in this lifetime.  Perhaps the 2022 equivalent transportation adventure is ... a tricked-out private jet (useful for mile-high escapades) or a sea-faring yacht like the ones owned by Russian oligarchs (a floating motel for mermaids).

Mike Mottler    LCCA 12394

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