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I have several Pola buildings gauge 1 / "G" scale buildings, G scale trains  (LGB, Mamod and Accucraft) and Standard Gauge Trains.
Since Standard gauge does not have a dedicated scale could I mix the two on a layout?
Will the Pola buildings be to large for Standard Gauge if I use the standard gauge trains only?
 I searched the forum for this information and was unable to find a link.

Last edited by RonH
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"G scale" is a fairly nebulous term.  to me it covers all the 'G'arden scales from Fn3 (1:20.3) and larger up to representing US standard scale (on #1 gauge track) at 1:32, though in terms of manufacturers such as Pola (likely European structures), it can also loosely refer to the ~1:24 LGB scale which represents meter gauge prototypes on #1 gauge track.

with 3-rail Standard/ Wide gauge, while equipment is hard to pin down to a scale, the track gauge (assuming it's representing US standard gauge), is about 1:26, so you are at least in the ballpark.  perspective is the key.  try to group similar scale buildings together while placing the smallest scale buildings at the farthest visual point.

cheers...gary

Ron, I use a good number of "G  Scale" buildings, figures, bridges, tunnel portals, luggage, cargo, and other accessories on my layout.  Here a few photos of one village that has houses, schoolhouse, park gazebo, by Piko and Pola, mixed in with tinplate buildings. Also in the left background of the third photo, the big sawmill by Pola. They are not tinplate, so have a different look, but as for size they are fine for a toy layout.  "G Scale" actually has roughly the same range of scales, depending on manufactuirer, that Standard Gauge has: 1:32 to 1:22.  

north 3 copynorth 5 copyPICT0014 copyPICT0050 copyPICT0051 copy

david

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hojack posted:

Ron, I use a good number of "G  Scale" buildings, figures, bridges, tunnel portals, luggage, cargo, and other accessories on my layout.  Here a few photos of one village that has houses, schoolhouse, park gazebo, by Piko and Pola, mixed in with tinplate buildings. Also in the left background of the third photo, the big sawmill by Pola. They are not tinplate, so have a different look, but as for size they are fine for a toy layout.  "G Scale" actually has roughly the same range of scales, depending on manufactuirer, that Standard Gauge has: 1:32 to 1:22.  

north 3 copynorth 5 copyPICT0014 copyPICT0050 copyPICT0051 copy

david

David, your layout looks great, see lots of scales and everything blends together very nice. and the goose neck lamps (#59?). Love goose neck lamps have 3 or 4 #59's and a bunch or 58's. Also have the Marx main street lamps.
What I'm looking for is a tinplate layout to have fun. May try to incorporate O prewar in the back of the layout to represent distance (just to get those trains running.

I would like thank everyone else that responded to this post with great ideas and suggestions.

Tinplate Tom posted:

... as opposed to 1:29 for G and 1:32 for number 1 gauge.   ...

it's hard to know where to start with a statement like this.

1) 1:29 scale models on #1 gauge track is one of the worst matches in model railroading with a gauge/ scale error of close to 10% and what's even worse, unlike O gauge the error is due to the gauge being smaller, not larger.  trains essentially have a narrow wheel track to begin with and 1:29 scale only exacerbates that condition.

2) as i mentioned previously, there is no real definition of G scale or gauge.

3) 1:32 scale models treat #1 gauge track as US standard gauge of 56.5" and is one of the most accurate gauge/ scale matches with an error of less than 0.5%, however #1 gauge track can take on other scales very accurately as with Fn3 models (1:20.3 scale) which treat #1 gauge track as US 3' narrow gauge.

cheers...gary

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