Please excuse if this is silly, but here goes.

Took the attached photos at Steamtown some years ago. Directly behind the stack there is a small pipe that appears to continuously vent live steam. The detail photo shows the pipe but it disappears from view.

What is the purpose if this?

Thanks again for your support of the hobby!

 

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Original Post

I'm not an engineman but I do believe that it is the vent for the steam line that heats the lubricator. There was one on the CP 2317 as well.   

There are two (2)  Canadian National Mikados.  (?? Spare parts ??) 

Also a stainless steel tender.  

There was money spent, Steamtown  2008 economic stimulus package, some on cosmetic upgrades, little on major rebuilds, IMO, Mike CT.    Your picture shows a new roof, and building upgrades.   There was also a major heating system upgrade via 2008 stimulus money. 

  New rails in the yard, another major project. 

 

Crane was new, or refurbished.  

Place is a interesting working museum.  National Historic Site, Part of the National Parks System, Dept of Interior.      Mike CT. 

Last edited by Mike CT
@Mike CT posted:

Power generator.  Lighting.   

No. The dynamo (steam driven generator for lighting) is mounted directly forward of the cab, and has a much larger steam exhaust then that little tube behind the exhaust stack.

Original Question not answered  ??? The small steam vent behind the smoke stack is from what steam appliance ???

I'm not an engineman but I do believe that it is the vent for the steam line that heats the lubricator. There was one on the CP 2317 as well.   

That might make some sense...if the engine was operating in the Great White North. However, there would be no need to heat the lubricating oil at Steamtown...

@Mike CT posted:

Original Question not answered  ???

Yes it was, in the second post of this thread.

The small steam vent behind the smoke stack is from what steam appliance ???

As previously stated, steam exhaust from the valve oil mechanical lubricator internal heater.

 

@smd4 posted:

That might make some sense...if the engine was operating in the Great White North. However, there would be no need to heat the lubricating oil at Steamtown...

Actually valve oil is generally heated all the time, even in the summer, since it is so VERY thick. We always keep the 5 gallon cans of valve oil on some sort of heater in the crew car. On the UP crew car (the Art Lockman Tool Car) even the 55 gallon drum/drums of valve oil are always heated by electric coils from the 480 volt HEP system.

@smd4 posted:

We never heated any of our oil.

What brand/kind of valve oil do you use? Most of the big mainline locomotives, with high superheat temperatures (like 4449, 844, & 3985) have used a synthetic high temp valve oil, originally from Exxon, called Celestic 1500 (good for steam temps upwards of 1000 degrees F). It is REALLY thick!

Sapon-A-Med. Slightly less thick than honey. Of course our engine is a soak operating at 190 MAWP.

I guess that's the point. That CN Mikado, according to on-line sources, operated at a lower pressure than our little tank engine--only 180 psi(!), which seems low. No need to use the high temp/high-viscosity oil you guys are using.

Last edited by smd4
@smd4 posted:

I guess that's the point. That CN Mikado, according to on-line sources, operated at a lower pressure than our little tank engine--only 180 psi(!), which seems low. No need to use the high temp/high-viscosity oil you guys are using.

Yet, that CN Mikado is superheated, and I'll bet the steam temperature at the valves can exceed 500 degrees F, during their climb up that long grade they have. Plus, that synthetic product was readily available for many, many years. Even if they were/are using that Inter-Lube valve oil, for superheated steam applications, that is still pretty thick.

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