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Many have mentioned using the power supply out of desktop computers for a nice DC power supply with multiple voltage outputs.  I finally tore apart an old desktop today and was wondering about recommendations on these boards to connect the output plug from the supply.  Here are two from the big river site.  I had not thought about fusing but that seems to be a good idea. Does anyone have a recommendation?



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Thanks all, per your recommendations, I am going for the bottom one in my post.

I have one more question. In pulling apart a second computer (a Dell), it has a different power supply with a 6 pin and a 4 pin plug. I did not find a similar breakout board that takes these plugs and did not find a pin out for them either.  Does the 20/24 pin socket on the items above accept these too? No indication on the web pages but I am hoping.  Has anyone tried a supply like the Dell, It would be nice to use it too.  Thanks in advance.



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Hokie71,

From what limited number I've seen, the 4 pin square plug is most likely +12v (x2)  & Grd (x2).  The 6 pin I've not ran across.  Have you considered just putting a volt meter on it?  Also, not sayin' they don't exist, but I'd be very surprised if you can find a prefabricated breakout board for your Dell supply.  Hope this helps.

bd

@barnun posted:

Hokie71,

From what limited number I've seen, the 4 pin square plug is most likely +12v (x2)  & Grd (x2).  The 6 pin I've not ran across.  Have you considered just putting a volt meter on it?  Also, not sayin' they don't exist, but I'd be very surprised if you can find a prefabricated breakout board for your Dell supply.  Hope this helps.

bd

Good idea on the meter,  I should have paid attention to what they were connected to before I pulled them loose .  Once I know what they are, I might get lucky that they fit a sub set of the 24/20 pin connector.

@hokie71 posted:

Good idea on the meter,  I should have paid attention to what they were connected to before I pulled them loose .

As always, hind sight is 20/20.    But all is not lost ... it should be fairly simple to relocate those two sockets on the motherboard.  My gut says the 4 pin will connect near the processor.  The 6 pin I have no clue, but normally the power supply is looking for a short across two pins as a power up indicator so two pins may go to the power switch, which would only leave 4 pins that I'm thinkin' may be Grd, +3.3 & +5V and possibly another Grd or a -12V.  Best of luck.

bd

One other thought, if you're looking for something cost effective ... you might want to check with Best Buy, Staples or a local computer shop.  Most all of those recycle old electronics and may be willing to swap and old ATX power supply for an old Dell PC and you could drop off the remains of your old PC as opposed to a landfill.

bd

@barnun posted:

Hokie71,

From what limited number I've seen, the 4 pin square plug is most likely +12v (x2)  & Grd (x2).  The 6 pin I've not ran across.  Have you considered just putting a volt meter on it?  Also, not sayin' they don't exist, but I'd be very surprised if you can find a prefabricated breakout board for your Dell supply.  Hope this helps.

bd

Thanks all, great link on the pinouts too.  I plugged the dell supply in and tested this morning and as barnun suggested the 4 pin is 12v x2.  the 6 pin is 12 volts x2 and a 5 volt.  I do plan to recycle these two old computers (less hard drives) at either staples or best buy this week.  Looks like I will use the 20/ 24 pin supply which came from the HP computer and give the Dell away if anyone wants to pay for shipping on the for sale forum.

Usually those 4 and 6 pin plugs are for the extra power required by modern CPUs and graphics cards. I've never seen them without the normal ATX 20/24 pin connectors. However, Dell is big enough that they may be making custom motherboards that use a different standard or one that is proprietary.

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