All:

Any recommendations for a strong glue for styrofoam?  I've tried the Woodland Scenics Foam Tack Glue (ST-1444).  It's less than impressive.

Thanks,

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Original Post

Hot glue to tack it down, and after it's coated with Hydrocal, it's not going anywhere.


Not captains of industry, not makers of things, keep your vulgar monies! We are a justice sandwich, no toppings necessary. Living rooms of America, do you catch my drift? Do you dig?

Might also try LocTite Clear Power Grab.  It's an instant grab, heavy duty exterior construction adhesive.  I've used it quite successfully for gluing foam to foam, cork roadbed to foam, track to foam and track to cork roadbed.  In N-scale, one tube goes a long ways.  Maybe not so much in O-gauge. 

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high in either case.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

If the government knew how much fun O-gauge railroading was, they'd outlaw it!

Common sense is my second best trait.  Nonsense is my first, of course. 

G3750 posted:

All:

Any recommendations for a strong glue for styrofoam?  I've tried the Woodland Scenics Foam Tack Glue (ST-1444).  It's less than impressive.

Thanks,

George

George, by styrofoam, do you mean the blue XPS board (such as the Dow stuff available at Lowe's)?

MikeH

George,

If you are indeed referring to the blue XPS foam board by Dow, then Original Gorilla Glue will work wonderfully.  I worked extensively with Owens Corning pink XPS (different brand/color, same stuff) to build my Christmas layout this year.  I can tell you with 100% certainty that Gorilla Glue will bond the foam.  Here is a construction picture from last month:

IMG_6488

MikeH

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Definitely hot glue. Cheap, fast, strong.

--pete

 

 

My heart is warm with the friends I make, 

And better friends I'll not be knowing;

Yet there isn't a train I wouldn't take,

No matter where it's going.

                        Edna St. Vincent Millay

 

Styrofoam, or Foam insulation board.  There is a big difference'.. Hot glue will melt the Styrofoam, but not the blue,green, or pink foam board.  Liquid nails or any good whit glue will work on Styrofoam.  However, it needs ample time to dry and adhere well...... Best of luck... 

  Ted 

 

Me too. Loctite's Power Grab works also. Just make sure that you read on the label that it's "Foam Safe". Anything with strong solvent will melt foam. They make lower temp hot glue guns that extrude foam safe hot glues. If you're gluing up large surfaces though the glue will chill below liquid before the pieces are in place. For large surface I'd go with structural adhesives.

I have a post from yesterday about a box I converted for storing a Sharknose ABA. When I was gluing the foam dividers in the box I used two glues.  Elmers pro wood glue where I glued the foam to the cardboard and Gorilla glue for foam on foam.The Gorilla glue would have worked for all the gluing however it is much more expensive than the wood glue and I would have had to buy a new bottle.  The Elmers wood glue will work for foam on foam however it takes a very long time to cure. When gluing the foam to the cardboard the cardboard will facilitate drawing the water out of the glue however this does not happen with foam on foam and a sound joint can take a couple of days to cure if it is broad.  The Gorilla glue actually cures faster in the presents of a little water vapor much like CA.          j

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MikeH posted:
G3750 posted:

All:

Any recommendations for a strong glue for styrofoam?  I've tried the Woodland Scenics Foam Tack Glue (ST-1444).  It's less than impressive.

Thanks,

George

George, by styrofoam, do you mean the blue XPS board (such as the Dow stuff available at Lowe's)?

Yes, this the green or pink or blue extruded styrofoam.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

5EBC401D-A595-4251-B8F2-E5843992854143BCF36C-DD84-4C78-8F87-A30CE8B4E144Also using expanding foam from a spray can works great if you have all your pieces precut and ready.

  Home Depot and Lowes should have it

Much cheaper I think than the other glues for bulk scenery work for me

  I built most of this mountain so far, using spray foam as adhesive.

 Great for un even joints etc with the expand factor

  Here are some pics

Al

 

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lashup50 posted:

"I think back in the day I used Elmer's White and didn't have a problem adhering the styro to plywood, if that's what you're trying to do."

I'm referring here to the pink foamboard insulation, not the white styrofoam. 

Gorilla Glue and white glue and yellow wood glue will all adhere well to both construction foam and styrofoam.  Both these foams are made by mixing styrene monomer and a foaming agent. Construction foams have more styrene  per cubic inch and less foaming agent thus are denser. Chemically they are nearly identical to the plastic in model kits though the foaming agent may leave behind it's traces.  The problem with using White glue and yellow wood glue is the water in them must have a path to escape wood and cardboard will supply an adequate path for the water to escape. The problem with Polyvinyl acetate "white glue" is it is not very resistant to moisture.  Yellow wood glue "Aliphatic resin" is more resistant to water once cured.  If I am gluing any foam to cardboard or wood I will use yellow wood glue instead of white glue.  When gluing foam to foam any water in the glue will have a difficult time escaping and the joint will take a long time to cure. This is when I switch to Gorilla glue "Polyurethane glue" in fact a little water vapor will facilitate the cure. Huff your breath on the mating surfaces just before joining.  This stuff will foam up and adequate means of clamping are called for. It is great for filling gaps. Good article on wood glues though much applies to gluing in general.           j

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_glue

Hi George,

There's a number of decent adhesives and silicon that work just fine for gluing the Owens/Corning pink foam board together, that I've experimented with over the years. What I've found that works best IMHO is Titebond Translucent Wood Glue, it's also relatively inexpensive. I lightly score the two sides of foam board to be glued together with an old Exacto saw blade then run a bead of the glue a couple inches apart or so across the surface area of one of the pieces and then press them together. I also use a few appropriate length drywall screws to lightly fasten them together until the glue completely cures. Once the glue sets up those pieces will never ever come apart at the glue seams and one can carve as hard as they want without worrying about the pieces coming apart, they will pull wood up before separating from each other.  It is important to note, scoring the surfaces sufficiently is essential to allow for the white glue to dry completely. Without scoring dry times can be excessively long. Typically with scoring the surfaces though the white glue will completely dry within 24 hours. No nasty solvent smell or harmful vapors to breathe either...

Here's a couple examples of pieces I've glued together, still have a lot of sculpting and scenery to go on this cut and cliff shot, and actually I used some left over white silicon the foam on the left side of the cut, it holds okay but the pieces can be pulled apart with a significant amount of force, which could happen when sculpting.

IMG_0199

I used the Titebond in this valley section

IMG_0200

IMG_0201

Good luck!

John

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Trainman2001 posted:

Me too. Loctite's Power Grab works also. Just make sure that you read on the label that it's "Foam Safe". Anything with strong solvent will melt foam. They make lower temp hot glue guns that extrude foam safe hot glues. If you're gluing up large surfaces though the glue will chill below liquid before the pieces are in place. For large surface I'd go with structural adhesives.

I too like Loctite Power Grab.  An additional benefit is that it's available in a resealable tube, in case you only need a small amount - it will last longer than trying to keep a tube that goes into a caulking gun.  I'm sure that other adhesives are available in similar packaging, but I've found Power Grab to be a good value.

I am with Al! Expanding foam or  “great stuff” works well. It goes a long way and fills gaps for quick sloppy joints.  Temporarily Hold together with clamps, weights or temp nails. The foam expands if it can, but low  expansion foam I available as well.

Just noticed I was working on this mountain exactly 4 years ago.D23EA6DD-9AB5-481B-8936-165EF2881574

13820789-A598-4EAD-8B88-21FE8E1E7AD4

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You could also try DAP non-flammable Contact Cement....in the green can.   This is the non-solvent version of contact cement.  It's also low odor.

Among the materials listed as compatible for bonding is "foam".  Reading through consumer reviews, it appears several people have used it on construction foams...foam-to-foam, foam-to-paneling, etc...with 5.0 results.  

I have not used it on foam......yet.   But I used it exclusively in bonding my cork roadbed to the plywood substrate when laying track.  I chose this material principally for its low odor.....a family sensitivity that the HVAC system of our home does a good job of dispersing freely.....especially in the winter months....prime layout-building season.  But, now that I'm seriously beginning scenery work....and liberal use of structural foam....I think I'll give my remaining supply of this DAP adhesive a try.

One of the things I found in reading, however, is concerns about the use of hot-wire cutters in carving foam layers bonded with the adhesives.  Another reason why I've assembled a rather crude assortment of NON-hotwire cutters...read: old knife blades of all sorts of edges and lengths...is that odor-thing.  

I tend to agree with the observations re white glues and their ilk in this situation.  Of course, if a primary purpose of foams is to provide a barrier, impervious to air and changes in temperature, then why would anyone expect a water-based cement like white glue to air dry???   And the beauty of the DAP adhesive mentioned above is that you DO let the two surfaces dry BEFORE bringing them into contact, thereby effecting a quicker bond.  

While I agree with some of the other less-complimentary reviews on the DAP adhesive....that it's not as strong a bond as with the more common solvent-based (red can) version...I would wonder why that greater strength would be an issue in building simple substrates for static scenery.

Good thread to follow reported experience in this hobby.

KD

milwrd posted:

I had to try it myself because I couldn't believe it, but Glidden Gripper works great. Not only for foam to foam but I also used it to adhere foam to my plywood deck. Here is a good video on the subject from back in 2012. I know there's some newer adhesives on the market that work well too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnOegaOKu38

Looks like a more than adequate replacement for Gorilla glue and very likely a good bit cheaper. I seldom use all the Gorilla glue in the bottle once you reach a point where you cannot squeeze any more air out of the bottle your leaving water vapor along with the remaining air and the glue left will soon cure in the bottle. I wonder if the Glidden Gripper is anything like ceramic tile mastic ?  I have used it on occasion to glue foam and it works fine though it cures a little slower than Gorilla glue. One positive aspect of the Glidden Gripper and ceramic tile mastic is they don't foam up. Probably don't fill gaps as well though.  A small aside on Gorilla Glue and Great Stuff foam. Basically the same substance with a great deal more foaming agent in the Great Stuff. I don't think anyone has mentioned Epoxy yet, or I missed it.  I have often glued Styrofoam with epoxy, it works fine. In fact most of the folks building home built aircraft use epoxy to glue Styrofoam.  This could be yesterdays news as I have not run in the circle in a number of years and I can see Gorilla Glue working just as well as epoxy in many if not most instances.      j

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