Skip to main content

You don't have to disassemble the whole chassis, but you do have to pull the wheels from one side to unscrew and pull out the brush holder.  Having done that, it is just four screws to take the side frame off and you can do a thorough inside cleaning.

To take the wheels off, you need something that will hold the bottom side  of the frame while you use a big hammer and a nail set to drive the axle out of the wheel on the top - slowly, carefully,  Be patient and it will come out.

I don't know what advice to give on resetting the wheels other than having an old vice like mine.  IT's an 80 year old vice (from y father's workshop) that has 2.5" between the jaws and is well squared.   Since the axles normally end at the wheel surface, it's easy to get the gauge right.  Don't know what modern tools will do the job.

ML

You don't have to disassemble the whole chassis, but you do have to pull the wheels from one side to unscrew and pull out the brush holder.  Having done that,

Umm, on the drum (barrel) commutator super-motor there is a single screw on the motor side plate about 3/8" from the bottom in the middle of the side plate between the wheels. Remove that screw and pull the brush holder plate straight out. Hopefully there is enough wire on them to get it out, otherwise you'll have to loosen the wire from the wafer with manual reverse switch. There is a brush spring detent on each brush tube assemble to release tension when reinstalling the holder.

See here: http://themotordoctor.com/lionel_super_motor.htm

A few more questions:

After I pull the brush plate out and replace the brushes, how does one get everything back in its proper place, since those brushes are under tension from their springs? How do you keep them "separated" enough from each other to then slide back onto the commutator? Stupid question I know, but still...

I'm working on a couple of #112 gondolas; after stripping and cleaning, what level of sheen should the truck frames have? I know it's probably a matter of preference, but I'm talking about the factory-applied finish. Gloss? Satin? Flat?  (If it matters, and according to the TCA book I have, these are "100 series type V" trucks for "later" series cars, with the blackened painted(?) side frames...)

As always, thank you!

Mark in Oregon

91625610_641877999711716_3750863985491050496_o

Attachments

Images (1)
  • 91625610_641877999711716_3750863985491050496_o
Last edited by Strummer

Here is a technique that I have used successfully for holding brushes while assembling certain motto types.   Make a two inch long piece if cardstock about the width of the spacing of the brushes.  Make a hole in the center for the shaft of the armature.  US the cardstock to compress the brushes into the holders and wrap it around the plate, holding in place with Scotch tape.

Place that assembly over the armature shaft and start the brush plate screws just enough to hold. Then tear out the cardstock, which will leave the brushes in contact with the armature.  Then tighten the screws.

Here is a technique that I have used successfully for holding brushes while assembling certain motto types.   Make a two inch long piece if cardstock about the width of the spacing of the brushes.  Make a hole in the center for the shaft of the armature.  US the cardstock to compress the brushes into the holders and wrap it around the plate, holding in place with Scotch tape.

Place that assembly over the armature shaft and start the brush plate screws just enough to hold. Then tear out the cardstock, which will leave the brushes in contact with the armature.  Then tighten the screws.

Thanks.

I'm trying to visualize what you describe and it sounds like the chassis has been taken apart (?)... something I'm hoping to avoid having to do...

Please correct me if I'm getting it wrong.  🙂

Mark in Oregon

I call them character! Looks great, what kind of paint are you using? Keep the pics coming.  

Thanks Rich.

I used Rust-Oleum "Lagoon"; it was the closest to the Lionel "Peacock" I could find. Not exact, but close enough... for me, anyway. 😊

Just need to address those motor brushes, attach the headlights and re-assemble.

One of the things that struck me is what heavy gauge this stuff was made from. It's real metal! 😁 Lots of fun to work on...

Mark in Oregon

Headlights installed and working:

#10 Lights

...even this turned out to be an adventure; the slot/holes for the casting and the fiber contact piece was not large enough for both items to fit, so I had to do a little CAREFUL filing on the body to enlarge those openings.

Managed to do that without damaging the body and/or the paint, so we're good to go.

Mark in Oregon

Attachments

Images (1)
  • #10 Lights

Here is a sequence of photos showing how I deal with the springs when mounting the brush plate.

Cut a piece of card stock as shown long enough to wrap around the plate.  Make a hole in the middle to fit the armature shaft. (I had to add a piece to the one shown.

IMG_7224

Put the brushes in the holder using the cardstock to hold them against the springs.  Tape the cardstock around the brush holder, aligning the hole with the hole in the plate.

IMG_7225IMG_7226

Place the brush holder in position   While holding the assembly remove the cardstock - use scissors to cut through one side and tear it from the other.

IMG_7229IMG_7232

Replace the screws and you're ready to go.

IMG_7233

Attachments

Images (8)
  • IMG_6297
  • IMG_7222
  • IMG_7224
  • IMG_7225
  • IMG_7226
  • IMG_7229
  • IMG_7232
  • IMG_7233

For use w/ the open-faced brush holders, I have a simple fix.  Take a normal paper clip, bend out 1 leg straight, then bend the straight end into a "U" shape.  Now you can install the brush holder w/o the brushes attached, but with the springs in place. When re-mounted, use the paper clip tool to 'lift' the spring arm, and insert your brush in the holder, then just slide the clip tool out.  The Old Man   

P.S.  I will demonstrate on our next video podcast that the boys do every couple of weeks.   

The Train Shop Weekly - youtube

Last edited by Harry Henning

I appreciate everyone's input, I really do.

On the engine in question (a Standard Gauge #10) the armature is of a different type than the one shown in the above photos. I'm hoping someone reading this will know what I mean and can clarify...

In the meantime, here it is, looking bluer than ever (🤔) in the display case:

IMG_20220605_183843390~3

Still need to find a replacement coupler for one end, but as of now, everything seems to be working.

It's been a very interesting project. 🙂

Mark in Oregon

Attachments

Images (1)
  • IMG_20220605_183843390~3
Last edited by Strummer

Mark sounds like you have an older style “Barrel” commutator.

31934947-3B82-43DE-B3C7-9C45A213F854

Here is a link that discusses the importance of the phenolic washer, which holds the three commutator segments together, and how to epoxy them if its broken.  It sits above the solder ball on the left side of the pic, on top of the horizontal lip of the segments.

You should inspect this to make sure you aren’t going to have a blown commutator.
https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...matures-commentators

Here is a pic of an engine I had picked up that suffered from a broken ring.

59BABC78-F898-4096-81E5-20C57892BBB3

Fortunately all three segments were still in the motor. I was able to clean this up, and used a ring of heat shrink tubing in place of the ring. I also placed a drop of super glue on the back of each segment to the shaft. So far so good with its performance. Unfortunately I hadn’t taken any pics of the finished product  

Attachments

Images (2)
  • 31934947-3B82-43DE-B3C7-9C45A213F854
  • 59BABC78-F898-4096-81E5-20C57892BBB3
Last edited by Rich Wiemann
@texgeekboy posted:

In the ‘before’ photo the grates (or whatever) on the side were a different color than the body. Was that a non-original mod?

Those "vents" were, as far as I can tell, always the same color as the rest of the body; but I'm new to Standard Gauge, so don't take my word for it.

Hopefully, someone who knows about SG will be able to give you a definitive answer...

Rich

Thanks for your response; yep, that's the kind I was referring to. 🙂

Fortunately, my armature looks to be in good condition; I just would like to know the best way to change the brushes without having to pull the wheels and disassemble the entire thing.

Mark in Oregon

Last edited by Strummer

Earlier in this thread it was suggested to use white vinegar for cleaning old, rusty parts; this didn't surprise me, as we use it for general cleaning around the house.

Anyway, a few days ago I dropped some wheels, axles and truck frames into a small container of it, then promptly spaced it out until this morning. Here are the results, after a simple wiping down of the surfaces and before any wire brushing:

wheels 2

It totally blew me away how well it worked. Thanks to all who suggested it!

Mark in Oregon

Attachments

Images (1)
  • wheels 2

...I might add here the vinegar did an equally terrific job on the truck frames. Here is a pic of what began as (2) very funky and rusty pieces:

trucks

I suppose giving them a light coating of some kind of wax or oil might keep them from rusting again(?) After all, the Oregon Coast is in what is considered a "temperate rain forest" type of climate...

Mark in Oregon

Yachats Sunset

Attachments

Images (2)
  • trucks
  • Yachats Sunset

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×