All:

Can someone recommend the correct part number for the Scotchlok (suitcase) connector to take 20 gauge taps off a 20 gauge bus?

Thanks,

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

Original Post
Moonman posted:

I don't believe there is one - the red is for 18 bus and as small as a 22 tap

Have you already installed the bus?

Thank you.  I didn't see one either.  I thought I was missing it.  I guess we'll do this the old-fashioned way - strip insulation off the "bus", wrap the feeder around it, and either insulate using electrical tape or liquid tape.

Thanks, everyone.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

I was also going to recommend Posi-taps, but Tony is right on the ball. Just wrapping wire would not make a positive connection for the long run. Good way to start a fire, or at the very least make resistive heat. 

John

Located in the real Upstate NY

G3750 posted:
Moonman posted:

I don't believe there is one - the red is for 18 bus and as small as a 22 tap

Have you already installed the bus?

Thank you.  I didn't see one either.  I thought I was missing it.  I guess we'll do this the old-fashioned way - strip insulation off the "bus", wrap the feeder around it, and either insulate using electrical tape or liquid tape.

Thanks, everyone.

George

The 18 red/black is sold as standard hook-up wire in hobby shops. Use that for bus and the smaller gauge for taps. That's what I did for a long row of street lamps and used the red splice taps.

Carl

Arctic Railroad

FYI for all.

Yellow is used for 10-12 Gauge.

Blue is used for 14-16 Gauge.

Red is used for 18-22 Gauge.

Smaller Gauge Number is Larger Wire Diameter and Stranded Wire works better than Solid Wire usually in most of our applications. Bends easier, handles electricity better, and less likely to break if flexed several times. Always solder,and/or use some type of connection, even a wire nut to join two wires together instead of just wrapping two wires together with tape. Wire it correctly the first time. Save yourself headaches later on trying to find electrical problems and needing to tear apart your layout to fit it. Not fun!

Sincerely, Gary P.  Hopefully some day again to be rebuilding the Phillips Junction Railroad layout in Slackerville after my medical issues.

All, just to clarify, this wire is carrying the TMCC signal.  It's not carrying a lot of juice.  However, I will take all your suggestions into account and look for a better way.  

More when I know it.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

All:

I solved this another way.  The wire in question was not a bus - it transmitted the TMCC signal.  Take a look at the blue wire.

DSCN6804DSCN6810DSCN6812DSCN6813

Anybody see a problem with this?

Thanks,

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

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Photos (5)

I don't think there is a problem - it is just unusual to see the power supply/transformer  that far from the base - it is not a problem though - cool to see that you are still running those components

forum member Mike CT has a board with the TMCC components connected and power and signal distributed with a similar technique.

Are the devices inline with the DB9 connector on the base Z-Stuff data wire drivers?

Carl

Arctic Railroad

Moonman posted:

I don't think there is a problem - it is just unusual to see the power supply/transformer  that far from the base - it is not a problem though - cool to see that you are still running those components

forum member Mike CT has a board with the TMCC components connected and power and signal distributed with a similar technique.

Are the devices inline with the DB9 connector on the base Z-Stuff data wire drivers?

Hi Carl,

Thanks for responding.  I must admit that I spent a fair amount of time trying to organize the components on this board.  To your first point, the TMCC Command Base is roughly 3' from the TPC-400.  That TPC-400 is getting its power from below the board's edge (bottom of the photo).  A PowerHouse 135 will be connected to the terminal block there.

Yes, the devices in-line with the DB9 connector on the Command Base are Z-Stuff DZ-2001 Data Wire Drivers.  There are 3 of them and they will control the Western, Central, and Eastern switch buses.  The bus length is limited to 75', which seems like a lot, but that gets consumed pretty quickly.  The position of the wires on the boards wasn't really optimal.  Their wires meet up (on the terminal block) with the 15VAC power pairs (red & black) for each of the 3 buses.  Power is supplied from the 15 VAC tap of a K-Line PowerChief 120F accessory transformer.

The whole board is 2' x 8'.

George

TCA, NMRA, PRRT&HS Modeling the PRR Panhandle Division between 1948-1957.

G3750 posted:
Moonman posted:

I don't think there is a problem - it is just unusual to see the power supply/transformer  that far from the base - it is not a problem though - cool to see that you are still running those components

forum member Mike CT has a board with the TMCC components connected and power and signal distributed with a similar technique.

Are the devices inline with the DB9 connector on the base Z-Stuff data wire drivers?

Hi Carl,

Thanks for responding.  I must admit that I spent a fair amount of time trying to organize the components on this board.  To your first point, the TMCC Command Base is roughly 3' from the TPC-400.  That TPC-400 is getting its power from below the board's edge (bottom of the photo).  A PowerHouse 135 will be connected to the terminal block there.

Yes, the devices in-line with the DB9 connector on the Command Base are Z-Stuff DZ-2001 Data Wire Drivers.  There are 3 of them and they will control the Western, Central, and Eastern switch buses.  The bus length is limited to 75', which seems like a lot, but that gets consumed pretty quickly.  The position of the wires on the boards wasn't really optimal.  Their wires meet up (on the terminal block) with the 15VAC power pairs (red & black) for each of the 3 buses.  Power is supplied from the 15 VAC tap of a K-Line PowerChief 120F accessory transformer.

The whole board is 2' x 8'.

George

I found a thread with a photo of MikeCT's power board - check out the 7/19/19 post in this thread. I also see that Mike was trying to help you with a TPC issue. You can see that he is using the same gear - he would help you with any issue

Carl

Arctic Railroad

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