Skip to main content

Have 2 pairs of cabs- 1 pr. is 2353, the other 2343. They are coming along great- chassis are done and exact "computer matched" painted silver done. - now working on the bodies. Have a perfect match for the red cab color and it is done. The silver is way more difficult to match- color and "sheen". Any ideas/sources for the silver would be welcome. The silver 2343's appear darker to me-painted over black cabs.. The silver on the 2353's appears lighter to me- painted over light grey cabs.. These are small areas that I will use a fine tipped brush to blend and refinish.

Pictures attached to show what's up.

Thanks everyone.

Attachments

Images (5)
  • IMG_0109: 2343 Restoration top view
  • IMG_0110: 2343 Restoration left front view
  • IMG_0111: 2343 Restoration left rear side view
  • IMG_0113: 2343 Restoration front right side view
  • IMG_0108: 2343 Restoration top rear view
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Thanks to both Artie and Jeff.

Interestingly I used Floquil "Old Silver" -bottled-myself for years.. mine dried up- but hear it hasn't been around for a long time.. I found a cross reference from MicroScale Industries that lists the original Floquil colors on the left side of the page and then moves across the page to the right..they list new manufacturer comparable  as Model Masters #1402 - "German Silver Metallic"- enamel base with metallic "sheen",   Going to move that direction next. I live in a fairly large city but hobby shops don't want to mess with low ticket items like paint anymore. Forces you to the internet-where the pricing is high and so are the shipping charges- often more than the item itself.  Get to $20.00 bucks real quick.. Ripoff!

I used to paint back in the 80's- used Krylon paints because they were also very close to Lionel with good base coverage- and were easy to spray. They have vanished also- no more in Home Depot or Walmart or Hobby Shops. How come?

I also liked the small cans of Testors- their paint laid down nice and even with a hard surface - but they have gone absent also.

Restoration has been one of my favorite pastimes for years.  But the paint problems coupled with the lack of"O" gauge decals (Champ, Walthers, Microsale is iffy) makes it real difficult to "have fun" .

I don't give up easy. Some pics to make us all happy.

Attachments

Images (6)
  • 019-IMG_0070-002: finished 2343 ABA-ground up restoration- new tops.
  • 020-IMG_0069-002: finished 2343 B unit- new top plus ground up restore
  • 048-IMG_0039-007: finished 2343 Santa Fe ABA- Union Pacific "City of Los Angeles" on Layout
  • IMG_0028-005: finished 2353 Santa Fe- Denver Rio Grande "Bumble Bee", 2343 Santa Fe - restored SP "Black Widow"
  • IMG_0030-004: finished 2353 ABA Santa Fe- restored & repainted Union Pacific
  • IMG_0049: in process 2353 ABA Santa Fe- restored & repainted as Union Pacific "City of San Francisco"

Thanks guys- Postwar Lionel F-3's are my favorites- have been for 42 years.  Years ago(1970's-80's) there was no MTH, Weaver, Kline, Williams.. so I scoured local neighborhood's garage sales & local classified ads. I operated in a 'cleanup, fixup mode' all the time and did "upgrade" collecting and selling. Also got into painting and restoration... Things were cheap. They had to be (I had a young family to support struggling in my early business career and saving for a house etc.) There wasn't any big money left over for trains. $100.00 was a huge, rare expenditure for me.

I stuck with it and have enjoyed the ride. There is a saying- "A  laborer works with their hands.  A craftsman works with their hands and head. An artist works with their hands, their head and their heart."  That's the difference in anything you decide to do. Passion. And the thrill of the chase....to find the next project.

We have a responsibility to preserve the past for future generations- Made in America by Americans- the best that ever was. Made to last- simple, sturdy stuff. Not high tech, expensive, finicky junk- that will not endure into the future (no circuit boards). Gotcha!

How about a car from that time period - say a 1955, 56 or 57 Chevy BelAir ? Same principles apply..

I am glad to be a 'baby boomer'- and posterity of the 'greatest generation' that ever lived - who went thru the Depression with nothing, started to recover from it, only to go off to WWII at great sacrifice again.  Wow.

A few more pictures of F3's to enjoy including the next generation...

Best Regards. 

Attachments

Images (17)
  • IMG_0033-005: stripped, primed, F-3 shells August 2021
  • IMG_0063: stripped, Illinois Central frame June 2020
  • IMG_0021-007: Illinois Central F-3 restore June 2020 on track to test reassembly operation
  • IMG_0004-006: Illinois Central F-3 restore painted frame June 2020
  • IMG_0025-005: Illinois Central F-3 AB restored 1955 set 2239W  on layout maiden run since restoration Dec. 2020
  • IMG_0023-007: Illinois Central F-3 restored AB 1955 set 2239W on layout maiden run since restoration Dec 2020
  • IMG_0038-007: City of Los Angeles powered A restored unit on layout - first run August 2021
  • IMG_0037-007: City of Los Angeles unpowered unit on layout August 2021- first run August 2021
  • IMG_0092: Santa Fe 2343 shells "chrome painted"- June 2021- will become custom Burlington F3 AA shells
  • 1-Glenn & Ben: Grandpa Choo Choo with Grandson Ben - Lionel Postwar Santa Fe Set Christmas Tree Layout
  • IMG_4041: train room F3 display refurbished Postwar IC and Southern
  • IMG_4042: train room F-3 display refurbished Postwar WP  AA and B&O AB
  • IMG_4043: train room F-3 display custom painted Denver RG "BumbleBee", Southern Pacific  "Black Widow"
  • IMG_4044: train room F-3 display  refurbished Postwar B&O AB, Texas Special AA
  • IMG_2544: some of the next generation of train nuts Ben and Wyatt @ Grandpa's House Christmas Layout
  • IMG_2474: Ben gets his first train set
  • IMG_2477: Ben running  his own Hogwarts Set under the Tree


We have a responsibility to preserve the past for future generations- Made in America by Americans- the best that ever was. Made to last- simple, sturdy stuff. Not high tech, expensive, finicky junk- that will not endure into the future (no circuit boards). Gotcha!

How about a car from that time period - say a 1955, 56 or 57 Chevy BelAir ? Same principles apply..

I am glad to be a 'baby boomer'- and posterity of the 'greatest generation' that ever lived - who went thru the Depression with nothing, started to recover from it, only to go off to WWII at great sacrifice again.  Wow.

GrandpaChooChoo,

Quite happy for you. Very, very nice work.  Thanks for your comments as well.

Please take the following as constructive criticism, meant to be received with only the best of intentions.

Not to cause an issue, because we like to be neighborly on the forum, but just one question: What does 'Gotcha' mean?

(I too am a Baby Boomer, and also a proud son of the Greatest Generation. Unfortunately your diatribe on newer stuff is a direct smack in the nose to many, many, many of us who've designed and built that apparent crap that you have a problem with.  And not being retired yet I still work at it every single day.

Did your '55-6-7 get 40 MPG? Did it keep you safe in a crash? Was it friendly to the environment? Did it last an average of 13 years on the road in everyday use, and climbing, like modern cars do, even with all their "high tech" gadgets? If I recall, and I was about 10 years old at the time, I didn't see more than a mere handful of '55-6-7's on the road in daily use by 1968, 69, or 70.

Yes, Post-War items were solidly built, but by 1969 Lionel was in sad shape because the world had passed it by. If you don't like the newer technology it needed to survive then don't buy it, and you obviously don't, but please don't berate it.

I think that you'll agree with me that, in addition to being play toys, Toy Trains taught the kids that played with them basic fundamental and technical skills that they could use their entire lives.

For toy trains to do that in today's world, and to have done so over the last 40 years to get here, they've needed to go forward, and thank goodness they have. Maybe not perfectly at times, but they have.

And from where we stand today even more new things are needed in today's world, to teach today's kids and grandkids their future, just like they did in the Post-War period, and in fact just like they did when Lionel began in 1900.

I fully support our hobby in providing those fundamentals. Not only the old, but the new as well. As difficult as it may be, can you?)

Mike

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×