Steam Trains In The Water

Riding in one of these trains must have exciting. How did the crews know the rails were not washed out? In some of these pictures, it is a wonder that the engines kept their fires going.

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Bobby Ogage

"I hear that train a coming,

it's Long Island No. 39 rolling

around the bend"

 

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Back in the mid 1960's, flooded waters covered the rails of the CB&Q in Savannah Ill, if I remember correctly. The Q used their excursion engine, 2-8-2 4960, to pull both freight and passenger trains through the water.  They could not use diesels because the water was too deep for the traction motors. 

Somewhere there are photos of this, as it  was covered in Trains Mag. I think the passenger train might have been the combined TC Zephyr/Empire Bldr/North Coast Ltd.

RAY

As far as the track, I can guarantee that no crew operated through long stretches of water substantially over the top of the rail without someone from Maintenance of Way okaying it.  Okay, there were probably a few isolated cases where a renegade Engineer charged right in, but most, who wanted to stay employed, did not take it upon themselves.

Things for Maintenance of Way to consider:

  • Was the water flowing or just rising?
  • What is the condition of the ballast, sub grade, and ties?
  • How long has it been under water?

Probably some poor Trackman in a pair of hip-waders was sent to walk the track before a train was okayed to pass.

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

That Shay may be photoshopped, but track on a W. Va. logging road was laid right THROUGH a shallow creek, and photos exist of logging power nonchalantly fording the creek as water flows over the rails.  I am wondering how l can model that.

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

Reminds me of a video I stumbled upon at the local library 20 years ago.  Steam engines were headed to the scrappers en masse, so some lines decided to have parties and stage head-on steam engine collisions before they were salvaged.  Almost like a snuff film for steam engines.  Very odd.

 

David

colorado hirailer posted:

That Shay may be photoshopped, but track on a W. Va. logging road was laid right THROUGH a shallow creek, and photos exist of logging power nonchalantly fording the creek as water flows over the rails.  I am wondering how l can model that.

battery power and real water ?

Rusty Traque posted:

Bearings are the least of a flooded railroad's worry.  Generally, flood waters aren't good for anything on the railroad.

flood 6

Rusty

A few of those look like they could use a boat anchor before they float away.

Maybe a hopper or gondola? Sure.

A refer? Maybe

But,  I never thought I'd see a floatin boxcar let alone a few.  (How do you model THAT lol)  

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





RickO posted:

That certainly can't be good for the bearings.

Not as bad as you would think with plain bearings, assuming that the flood water wasn't too muddy.  The car department would certainly want to suck the water out of the cellars and refill with oil ASAP.  Occasionally you will see photos of express engines with permanent valves and water lines from the tender tank to the tender journal boxes.  In case of a hot box, the water could be turned on, allowing the engine to make the next terminal without delaying the train.

Roller bearings on the other hand are required to go to scrap if ever submerged.

Ray of sunshine posted:

Back in the mid 1960's, flooded waters covered the rails of the CB&Q in Savannah Ill, if I remember correctly. The Q used their excursion engine, 2-8-2 4960, to pull both freight and passenger trains through the water.  They could not use diesels because the water was too deep for the traction motors. 

This was also the plot of a Donald Duck comic book.  Uncle Scrooge's fancy new streamliner was trapped in a flash flood with the traction motors submerged,  but Donald,  driving an old steam engine slated for scrapping,  pushed it free and saved the day...   

Mitch 

It's crackers to give a rozzer the dropsy in snide!

 

Remember, SCROUNGE!

I fished out W.E. Warden's "West Virginia Logging Railroads" book which has several photos of Elk River Coal and Lumber geared locos splashing through several fords on the Lilly Fork.  ERC&L had an aversion to bridges as well as the usual logging roads' avoidance of ballast or tie-plates.  I thought l might use the clear plastic pourable "stream" material, and cover the track to just below the rail tops, to model a ford a train could pass through, keeping a slot for flanges inside the outside rails 

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

I forgot to mention that the Elk River did not just lay track through and across creeks; it also lald them down streambeds, running trains with or against the flow of water, as also shown in photos.   I am not going to try to model that.  It doesn't mention if washouts were a problem.

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

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