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If anybody can't deal with strollers, carts or whatever please do us all a favor and stay Home.

 

If your so afraid of falling, tripping or somebody hitting you with their strollers then stay home, more trains for me.

 

This is York people, time to have fun, meet old friends, make new friends, buy trains, look at trains you wish you could buy. Did I say have some fun? 

Originally Posted by Conductor Earl:

I think that perhaps there could be regular traffic announcements: "Here is your York Meet traffic report for 10 A.M......There is an stroller accident on isle G in the Orange hall...wrecking crews are on site, expect delays, Suggest you take an alternate route.....There is a back up at the door at the Brown hall..15 min. delays.....Gray hall is experiencing rolling delays every 30 minutes due to 'wandering souls"...plan accordingly..." 

 

Conductor Earl

...and that could be quickly followed-up by:

 

And remember, all the fuss-budgets out there, to get annoyed and ticked-off at positively everything picayune that does not go your way. Be annoyed at every bump or hesitation by a pedestrian or wheeled fellow hobbyist. See children as the potential enemy especially when their little hands are a-reachin'. Fight for your rights to be snotty and huffy. Bring the tile of curmudgeon to a whole new level of nausea.

 

Oh, and be sure to ask for 50cents off any figure a guy is selling for $9.50.

 

Just some thoughts inspired by moments I've witnessed around me.

Originally Posted by Chris Lord:
Originally Posted by Moonson:
Originally Posted by colorado hirailer:

Fifty cents off?  I should be able to get it for seven bucks!!

Sad.

Uhhhhh!  I think is was a joke. At least I hope so!

Uhhhh, I hoped so, too. I think we were both joking with each other. I tried to pick up on a hoped-for playfulness, since I assumed he was being ironic, right? So much is lost without facial expression and tone-of-voice. If the writer was being literal, so was I. If he was being ironic, so was I.

Last edited by Moonson

Why would someone in there right mind take a stroller into a known busy area, knowing full well they will be fighting to crowds. It's not the strollers but the folk pushing them that need to give there heads a shake. 

Yes we all want to see the kids having fun and carrying on our hobby, but believe me a young one in a stroller in heavy crowds will not be a whole lotta fun for them, there is nothing for someone sitting at floor level to get excited about, do these folk pushing strollers think about this? Of course not!!

Nowt against strollers, but I have to wonder what goes through the heads of the people pushing them.......

People, lots and lots of them are at the show to sell trains and to buy trains, that's the bottom line, the other stuff comes way below, layouts, food, socializing are all fine but buying and selling is the heartbeat of York, battling crowds with a young one in a stroller I would stick my neck out and say is not really the way to go......or should I say "stick my leg out"!

My wife and I went to the train show in springfield Mass one year about

5-6 years ago. She cant walk the show floors so we rented a wheel chair.

I put my Cowboy hat on and my driving gloves,(the wheel chair handles hurt

my hands) and off we went on an adventure.

we arrived at the show. carefully made it through 2 and 1/2 halls via my exceptional driving skills with a wheel chair. found some items to purchase. My wife said she had enough. made it back to the truck and had a great time. didn't run into anyone. didn't knock any tables over. and when we first got there, the guy at the door at the 1rst building even let my wife go into the ladies room before we even bought tickets.

I think its all about the drivers and watchin the kids in the strollers.

 

had a friend in Syracuse NY at their annual show set up G gauge equipment and a toddler grabbed a $500 loco and pulled it off on the floor, Dad was NOT watching his kid. And my friend was out $500 as the parent refused to take responsibility and left the show.

Happy to hear that strollers are allowed.  I used to be a member and went to the shows.  I am a younger guy with several young boys.  I might start my membership back up and attend this year.  It was very unwelcoming to not be able to use a stroller.   Going in a hall with trains for sale is much easier when your child is content in their stroller.  Simply drive the stroller out of the reach of tables while they look at a book or play with a toy.  Anyone who has interacted with young children can relate that it's much easier to walk around a bit and buy something with a stroller.  Having a 2 year old walk and hold hands or be carried limits the amount you can look at any item since at that age they just want to explore.  Time and time again I hear people saying that the hobby will die out yet a train organization bans strollers just so we don't have the chance of having our foot bumped?  Never made sense to me.

12 years ago we moved to York.  My daughter  was almost 2.  We went to York and and then found out strollers were not allowed.  To no avail I let my thoughts be known about the no stroller rule to anyone in the TCA Eastern Division that acted like they cared to listen.  13 years later the rule has finally been  changed  for the  better.  I can't wait to see the thousands of strollers  at the show now, or maybe  a dozen or so  over the  3 day event.

Seconds.....just seconds before the doors are opened......

the folk who matter the most......announce...........

 

When I say "break" I want a clean break......in the event of a knockdown, you will be directed to go to your neutral corners.

"Are there any questions?" You are all professionals so I expect a good clean fight, protect yourselves at all times. Now touch wallets and come in on the bell........

 

 

 

 

There are some benefits with the stroller. It can help contain the little one from reaching too far onto the table. It also enables the buyer (pushing said stroller) to buy more stuff. One by having some place to put it and two enabling buyer to stay on the buying floor longer because the kiddo can fall asleep if needed or at least not get tired walking. Wish this had been in place a few years ago. My boy is four and we could probably benefit from bringing a stroller but he is such a good walker, I don't want to waste the space in the car to bring it. We need to sell a bunch of stuff too. My boy needs a new pair of shoes, so please come buy from me, haha. Shameless post - K-10 Blue Hall

Similar to a stroller is a walker.  Yes, I own one, required part of a hip replacement several years ago.  Great support for the first week, much better than crutches, IMO.  It's not uncommon to see us elderly with walkers. A recent stop in Michigan to visit my one remaining aunt, she is in an extended care home, I took her to breakfast, (I-Hop), and the walker came along. Not at all a problem, the attendants at the restaurant were more than helpful, on a busy Sunday morning. Great experience, I just hope I make it to 80 something.   The inconvenience of support devices like a walker more than makes up for the alternative, having to pick someone off the floor and provide medical assistance.  IMO

Almost seems like we model railroads are a bit short sighted, Old come quickly, more quickly than most of us would like to think. 

 Mike CT   

Last edited by Mike CT

As noted, some national shows have much wider aisles....lots of families bring in small

kids and strollers at those, and, with wide aisles, no problem. Many of us, who may not yet need a walker or a wheelchair, are afraid it is gaining on us in our rearview mirror, due to age, and so try to be tolerant of them, although they take up most of the one way, narrow aisles at York and are difficult to pass...many wheelchairs are driven up the center of the aisle (if I wind up in one, I hope I have sense enough to not do that... but the aisles, again, are not wide).   My brother required a wheelchair, so I hope I am tolerant of them.  Dealer chairs in aisles, at York, for the same narrow aisle reason, and the fact that dealers cannot sit behind their tables, are at least as much a tripping hazard as strollers.  Strollers just add to it. I won't post what I am thinking

when I try to see around a dealer who is standing or sitting in front of what he, presumbably, has brought there to actually sell.  All make better doors than windows.

I am glad the Eastern Division decided to allow strollers again. We'll see whether the change turns out to be a good one.

 

That written, I cannot agree that a stroller is similar to a walker, scooter, wheelchair, or any other device that helps folks get around. The difference is the height of the stroller. Maybe they've changed the design. When my children were small, generally the front part of a stroller was fairly low to the ground, which is what used to make them easy to miss, and possibly trip over.

 

I'll write it again: I hope every thing goes well, and those that use strollers to bring their children into the halls have a great time. (and the non-stroller folks too)

How long is this thread about strollers and the like going to go on? We need younger people in our hobby and if that means some will come with their kids in strollers, so be it. Geez deal with it and stop all the whining. 

 

Last York was like being in God's waiting room, never seen so many old people outside of a nursing home. I want to see more younger people of all ages not just kids in strollers. 

 

If you can't deal with kids in strollers or afraid of getting your ankles bumped by the strollers or by somebody who has to use a powered wheelchair, STAY HOME!

Don't see an issue with strollers, walkers, or adult scooters as long as everyone uses common sense.

We set our booth up with aisles wide enough to accommodate scooters. Those walking need to wait and not try to climb over the folks in the scooters, but, by the same token, once you've selected an item to buy, please move out of the booth into the wider aisle to wait for your sale to be completed, allowing others free passage.

Key is common sense, something some folks don't bother to bring with them. 

Originally Posted by Traindiesel:
Originally Posted by david1:

…...Last York was like being in God's waiting room, never seen so many old people outside of a nursing home…….

Ehhh?  Whatchoo say, Sonny??

 

LMAO  

Ya, I know Brian, I had that experience this summer at Glacier National Park.   The young-ones came to me on Highline trail, the hike of the day,  wanting to know about the strange back pack.  I explained it dated to the 1990's, when I started hiking. It was a friendly conversation, with a few laughs.  I had to admit, I felt a good bit older when I saw the young-ones move-off quickly with a bounce in their steps.  But then I still can......,  Old is in the mind.  Old necessarily commands some respect, at least in my opinion.

Mike CT 

Last edited by Mike CT
Originally Posted by david1:

 

Last York was like being in God's waiting room, never seen so many old people outside of a nursing home. I want to see more younger people of all ages not just kids in strollers. 

 

Just keep in mind that those "old people" (I'm one of them) are what breathed new life into this hobby back in the 80s, 90s, and first few year of the current century. Without them there would be nothing like the O gauge bounty we have seen in that period. Yes, there would still be this segment of the hobby, and there may still have been a York Meet, but it would be nothing like what we have experienced in recent times. We may be waiting for God--that works fine for me--but we're still playing with trains while in line.

 

Originally Posted by Allan Miller:
 

Just keep in mind that those "old people" (I'm one of them) are what breathed new life into this hobby back in the 80s, 90s, and first few year of the current century. Without them there would be nothing like the O gauge bounty we have seen in that period. Yes, there would still be this segment of the hobby, and there may still have been a York Meet, but it would be nothing like what we have experienced in recent times. We may be waiting for God--that works fine for me--but we're still playing with trains while in line.

 

Yes, in my case 1986 at age 44 for a Christmas layout, and 2005 before I REALLY got into it at age 63. Raising 5 kids, we were living payday to payday, with little extra for toy trains.

Originally Posted by Mike CT:

Joe:  Best wishes, keep in mind I have done (3) cross Canyon hikes at the Grand Canyon with my new hip.  I like to think, replacement parts are as good as new.

Mike CT

9 days after the operation, things seem to be going well. Now using a cane, and can take some steps without anything. I realised I own a "walker" with a gas engine, so I carefully cut a little grass this morning.  

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