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Milwaukee has a cordless iron also...a little wide around the handle since it uses the same plugin 12 vdc Li ion batteries that the 12 v drills and their other tools use. It breaks over into a semi pistol style though. But handy battery wise if you use other Milwaukee 12 v cordless tools.

Vey informative thread and thanks to all for the posting.  I learned a  bunch and wanted to highlight a few that probably have wide application.

1) The connectors: @G3750 mentioned these 3M 558 connectors with the double bite (two clamps instead of one) seem  to have an added layer of security. Plus that is a nice surface to squeeze down upon.  I had not seen these.

3M™ Scotchlok™ Electrical Insulation Displacement Connector, 558

2: the pliers: many good suggestions and price points.  @Gilly@N&W noted the self adjusting robogrips and I found these at Lowes.  It appears they are trying to mark down their Kobalt line and andf for $15, I plan to check them out today.  Can't have too many pliers!

As @cjack and others mentioned, I do plan to use terminal strips where ever I can.  For $2.50 and the convenience of the pre made jumper strips, these are hard to beat:

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@cjack posted:

Milwaukee has a cordless iron also...a little wide around the handle since it uses the same plugin 12 vdc Li ion batteries that the 12 v drills and their other tools use. It breaks over into a semi pistol style though. But handy battery wise if you use other Milwaukee 12 v cordless tools.

Chuck, thanks for the info about the Milwaukee cordless soldering iron.  I've always had great performance out of Milwaukee tools.  I still regularly use the first 7 1/4" circular saw I bought 30 years ago, and many others acquired since.  Not one of them has failed (unless you count the numerous 12V Ni-Cad batteries, which I don't attribute to being Milwaukee's fault).

67499056-A197-42A4-9367-226BC3789E9ABF3DD940-2C5E-47AD-967A-80CFF9398864995F7C3E-12D3-401B-9F9F-0586AB3CC3EAI had tried various pliers for “suitcase” connectors, but I finally found this very old design type of pliers to be the most effective. The patent is from 1890 and 1892. My dad had a pair that I talked him out of some 55 or more years ago. In more recent years I have bought 3 or 4 more pairs on the “bay.” I love it. The tool has parallel jaws. Because of the design, it also gives you more force. And it has wire cutters as part of this great tool. The larger size has jaws that open  wide enough to use on the “suitcase” connectors.

W. SCHOLLHORN BERNARD CUTTERS PLIERS.

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