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I have two of these Atlas Signal Tower kits. This is my first assembly attempt in a dry run.  After the photos were taken on Saturday I added lamps to the interior of the second floor and one over the entrance door. I bought one kit at York and ordered the second one on sale.  I can’t wait to place them on the layout in a special location.  
I enjoyed your construction Alan and your photos DK…

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@jstraw124 posted:

My experiment with using ceiling tiles to make stone columns worked out as acceptable to use.  Now to make three smaller supports for the rest of the elevated bridge.

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Those piers look great. Can you explain your methods of carving? I can't tell from the photo if each course is a separate piece of tile or if you carved the stone into the face of one tile and assembled the 4 sides.

Bob

Happy Sunday and great work everyone. I’ve slowly been working on a new build using DPM parts. It will be an Atlantic and Pacific grocery store. The DPM modules take a bit more work than expected but I’m pretty pleased. I paired it with a Grandt Line store entrance.

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These modules have a slight crevice in each corner which made it easy to assemble the storefront with a paired base. The lower level just slides right in! Should come in handy for ease of detailing.

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I used spackle for mortar to mixed results. The crevices in the cornices are a bit rough. Dark washes have helped tone it down but I’ll probably try some weathering powders too after a few touch ups.

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@RSJB18 posted:

Those piers look great. Can you explain your methods of carving? I can't tell from the photo if each course is a separate piece of tile or if you carved the stone into the face of one tile and assembled the 4 sides.

Bob

Thank you. Below is the original post of how the tiles were glued and then carved with jigs.  They are glued first then carved as one piece.

Trying la new method of making bridge columns on the cheap.  I have leftover suspended ceiling tiles from my basement renovation.  The idea of making rock formations out of them inspired me to try to make cut stone out of ceiling tiles.

the tiles are 1/2” thick, so I ripped them into 1/2”x1/2” strips and cut them in lengths to wrap a piece of 2x4 lumber. I staggered them on the corners to create an overlap  and glued them together with wood glue.

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After they dried, I sanded the four sides flat by pushing them over sandpaper glued to a piece of plywood.

Next, I created some angled jigs out of scraps to guide a flexible blade utility knife along the existing seams and crosscuts to create the staggered stones that are 1/2”x1”.  Using a triangular shaped piece of wood, I pressed down into the seams.  It creates the tapered shadow of the stones.  Any natural voids or mistakes can be hidden with plaster, joint compound or grout compound.

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Next step is a base coat of grey spray paint, followed with layers of washes and dry brushing to hopefully make them more realistic.

the dado in the 2x4 is to allow power feeds to be installed to the elevated bridge.

@jstraw124 posted:

Thank you. Below is the original post of how the tiles were glued and then carved with jigs.  They are glued first then carved as one piece.

Trying la new method of making bridge columns on the cheap.  I have leftover suspended ceiling tiles from my basement renovation.  The idea of making rock formations out of them inspired me to try to make cut stone out of ceiling tiles.

the tiles are 1/2” thick, so I ripped them into 1/2”x1/2” strips and cut them in lengths to wrap a piece of 2x4 lumber. I staggered them on the corners to create an overlap  and glued them together with wood glue.

Next step is a base coat of grey spray paint, followed with layers of washes and dry brushing to hopefully make them more realistic.

the dado in the 2x4 is to allow power feeds to be installed to the elevated bridge.

And I'll bet the whole process made a big mess too. I love finding cheap materials to use for scenery. I'd rather spend $$$$ on locos.

Thanks- Bob

Seth, nice job - those switch towers are really nice quality kits.  I combined two to make one long switch tower approximating the construction of Tower 1 at South Station Boston.

I've been working on the interiors a bit more.  I recalled all the safety posters I would see posted in lunch rooms and offices and found a great number of 1950-60 era ones online which I've added to remind my Fish Pier workers of safety.  Also added doors and a few more details. IMG_3258

Lunch room and lockers for the Fish Pier workers.

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One of the offices handling the paperwork for shipping and receiving fish all over Boston.

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Shipping/Receiving and Manager's office for one of the fish companies, probably B&M Fish Co on Atlantic Avenue.

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@RSJB18 posted:

And I'll bet the whole process made a big mess too. I love finding cheap materials to use for scenery. I'd rather spend $$$$ on locos.

Thanks- Bob

I'll take pics and post with the other columns I still need to make.  It does make a mess, but allows me to make different height support since the 6 foot long combination of bridges are inclined at 2%.

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