Hi there folks, I am off to work this morning,  so this is the super short intro.  (Expect this to be edited later   )

Trying to get things ready for the coming holidays.   Have a great day 

20191115_205122

Talk to you soon 

JHZ563 

May God Bless us all.

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Original Post

Happy SWSAT, fellow fans of little engines that could!

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More pics when the crew shows up and #1545 gets to work doing what switchers do best 

Lew

 

Operator of the Plywood Empire Route in the Beautiful Berkshires

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

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CNJ #107 is a USRA 0-6-0 steam switcher model offered by Atlas O in 2007 at a list price of $649. The video shows it in operation at about 28 scale miles-per-hour on my 10’-by-5’ layout. The layout is small and so are the consists that I run on it. This engine has outstanding details, mechanical sounds and whistle.

Photos and video by:

MELGAR

MELGAR_2019_1112_01_CNJ_107_CONSISTMELGAR_2019_1112_02_CNJ_107_CONSISTMELGAR_2019_1112_CNJ_CABOOSE

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MELGAR_2019_1112_01V_CNJ_060_107_CONSIST
MELGAR posted:

CNJ #107 is a USRA 0-6-0 steam switcher model offered by Atlas O in 2007 at a list price of $649. The video shows it in operation at about 28 scale miles-per-hour on my 10’-by-5’ layout. The layout is small and so are the consists that I run on it. This engine has outstanding details, mechanical sounds and whistle.

Photos and video by:

MELGAR

MELGAR_2019_1112_01_CNJ_107_CONSISTMELGAR_2019_1112_02_CNJ_107_CONSISTMELGAR_2019_1112_CNJ_CABOOSE

Nice pics and video.  I agree... #107 is a winner!

Fendermain

High Tone Low Volume

RSJB18 posted:

New Haven 115 is a WbB "44 Tonner". I call it a center cab as its nowhere close to scale size.

Exactly. There were larger center cab switchers made: I think there was an 80 ton version, which is the way I think of the postwar period version and subsequent production models.

These two photos are NOT as of yet in my other repaint thread.

Here's one my redone Lionel 1990's production versions, which were made in both Rock Island and Pennsy. On this one, I sanded down the raised access door outlines on both sides of the hood in the areas the decals would be placed. The as-is original metal frame has lowered indentations, where the motor trucks mount, so I created a new styrene frame (braced with basswood on the upper side). which helps lower the overall height of the engine, reducing the original "high water" look.

I didn't mind the side handrails being made from plastic, save that every single one I've ever seen, the packaged handrails are always warped or bent so much they cannot be straightened.

So I filled in the holes on the walkway before repainting, and instead ran a metal handrail on each side of the upper hood. I only used a portion of the included front and rear Delrin plastic handrails.  I would have painted those white, but that Delrin doesn't hold paint very well. I also added actual headlights and cab illumination.

Conrail centercab switcher

And here's another example of taking some liberties with the word "prototypical." Conrail didn't have any Alco FA's in operation, and only a handful of cab units. On the other hand, during the early days of Conrail operation, they were so short on motive power, they were making due with everything they could get on to the rails. Which is kind of like "027" modeling today.

So on my layout, that would include the Alco FA, which serves in both mainline and switcher duties.

This is a K-Line model. The front coupler was broken, so I cobbled on a different coupler, but found the drop down thumbtack was hitting the engine body, so I cut the drop down thumbtack off. I also added an actual headlight and non-prototypical lighted red marker bulbs to the front... If I was truly concerned with every prototypical nuance, I would have gone to HO or N scale years ago. 

I actually prefer the older K-Line version with the molded on cab door handrails. The separate add-on ones are more easily painted a different color, but I find that painted metal handrails seem to be more subject to showing paint chips. Fortunately the white is easy enough to touch up if necessary. I think that's why the manufacturers either leave them unpainted or use a chemically blackened type.

Conrail 4832 Alco FA

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 I model the Rutland. They also had an 0-6-0 with #107. They purchased it used in1946 and it didn’t resemble their other 0-6-0’s. Close enough that I searched quite a while for the Atlas version. Although not dead accurate but close enough. It already had the no’s. for the head and back up light. Even the front boiler had a rectangular 107. The Rutland’s was round. I relettered it using Highball Graphics decals. Still haven’t got around to weathering yet. Pic. below was shot right after the decals were applied.

B2C3F210-6613-48F5-A76C-F519ED862808

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Dave C,

On what track diameter do you run your #107. I run mine on O-54 but the stiff tether makes it best on O-72. Also, how did you remove the lettering on the tender? Nice lettering job. The Atlas O model is a USRA 0-6-0 design. Rutland's may not have been.

MELGAR

 Mel, the Rutland 0-6-0’s had steam cylinders with a flat top and the crank pin was located on the middle driver. Something your not going to see produced in the mainstream models made. That can cover loosely a variety of roads. They purchased what became 107 from the Clarendon and Pittsford who dieselized early. The Atlas model is pretty close to the one they acquired. One of the Goggle sites has a good picture of it.

 To be honest I really haven’t run it much. It will basically work one of my yards which are pretty straight. It had no trouble with a Ross curved turnout. I can remember but I believe it’s an 054,072.  I read many of the stories involving the large tether. I found it easy to place the engine and tender upside down in a cradle. Remove the front truck on the tender and slide it back.This gives you plenty of room to insert the plug. It’s small enough to easily handle both lifting on and off the layout. I’ll probably at some point install Kadee’s. 

 My go to method for removing lettering. Is a quick swipe with CVS nail polish remover. I still usually repaint with Scalecoat gloss black. After the decals are on. I give it a coat of clear gloss. Followed by satin or gloss and then weathering. 

 

Was busy so by the time I caught up with them the crew was switching the Paint Factory.

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        IMG_4209

        IMG_4214

Lew

 

Operator of the Plywood Empire Route in the Beautiful Berkshires

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

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RSJB18 posted:

Happy SWSat

Time to stock up for winter

New Haven 115 is a WbB "44 Tonner". I call it a center cab as its nowhere close to scale size.

2018-01-13 07.58.49

I assume that's because the model is way too big to be a scale 44 tonner.

Great looking engine. I would love to get one with sounds and smoke, but I haven't seen a center cab with those features yet.

Arnold

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

PAUL ROMANO posted:
Tom Densel posted:

Here is a video I took of AC&Y H16-44 #202 working in the industrial area of my layout:

Tom

Hey Tom, is that FM switcher Lionel? The FM prime mover sounds are real good. Thanks for posting.

Paul, Yep, that is a Lionel unit.  As a young child, I remember seeing one of these sitting in Delphos, Ohio as we were passing through town.  Never got to see or hear it in action, however.  Fast forward 20 years and I married a girl whose back yard was almost next to the AC&Y/ NKP tracks.  Today I live about two blocks from the old right-of-way.  Tracks have been gone for quite a few years now.  When Lionel offered this unit, I had to have one.

Tom

PAUL ROMANO posted:
Tom Densel posted:

Here is a video I took of AC&Y H16-44 #202 working in the industrial area of my layout:

Tom

Hey Tom, is that FM switcher Lionel? The FM prime mover sounds are real good. Thanks for posting.

I agree.  I bought two Legacy ATSF  H16-44's and they have the best sound of any of my diesels.

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

Arnold D. Cribari posted:
RSJB18 posted:

Happy SWSat

Time to stock up for winter

New Haven 115 is a WbB "44 Tonner". I call it a center cab as its nowhere close to scale size.

2018-01-13 07.58.49

I assume that's because the model is way too big to be a scale 44 tonner.

Great looking engine. I would love to get one with sounds and smoke, but I haven't seen a center cab with those features yet.

Arnold

In addition to the length, 39 feet or 9 3/4 inches in O scale, a GE 44 tonner does not have walkways across the end of the loco. The side catwalks in front of the engineer and diagonally opposite are accessible only from the ground. To have walkways across the ends it would have to be either a 65 or 85 tonner. 

David Johnston posted:
Arnold D. Cribari posted:
RSJB18 posted:

Happy SWSat

Time to stock up for winter

New Haven 115 is a WbB "44 Tonner". I call it a center cab as its nowhere close to scale size.

2018-01-13 07.58.49

I assume that's because the model is way too big to be a scale 44 tonner.

Great looking engine. I would love to get one with sounds and smoke, but I haven't seen a center cab with those features yet.

Arnold

In addition to the length, 39 feet or 9 3/4 inches in O scale, a GE 44 tonner does not have walkways across the end of the loco. The side catwalks in front of the engineer and diagonally opposite are accessible only from the ground. To have walkways across the ends it would have to be either a 65 or 85 tonner. 

A more accurate version

https://live.staticflickr.com/8042/8046302719_d880ceb0e4_b.jpg

 

 

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

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