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In case you were wondering, here is the build-out process for shadowboxes that we have in "build boxes". The idea is to have all of the parts cut, painted and partially assembled so the product is quicker to assemble when the order is placed. It also allows us to be a bit more flexible when it comes to custom glazing. Some of you have seen this process at York when you placed the order at our table and came back either after a few hours or the next day to pick up the completed model.

These are the steps for the Birthplace of Basketball shadowbox project. The partial assembly includes the shadowbox, elevation and the first floor recessed doors. This order is for the base shadowbox, Roscolux Grey windows with translucent behind, and LED lighting in each of 11 individual sections - the whole enchilada.

The first picture shows the shadowbox coming out of the build box.

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The 2nd picture shows the windows installed with Roscolux Grey glazing.

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The 3rd picture shows the back/inside with the LED lighting installed.

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The 4th picture shows what the elevation looks like with four of the sections lit, without the translucent material behind the Roscolux Grey. The picture does not show that you can see into the lit sections, but you can- as clearly as if the glazing was clear.

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The 5th picture shows the translucent glazing added to the back of the Roscolux Grey.

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The 6th picture shows the four sections lit, this time with the translucent behind the Roscolux Grey. Notice the more even lighting dispersion and you also can not see in.

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There is a separate power lead wire for each lit section. The power lead wires are color coded by floor. The ground is common for each of the three section columns. Hook them all up together to light the whole thing, only five hooked up as shown or have us program an Arduino to randomly turn on and off the lights.

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Our version of the World Trade Center, built for ACE Elevator Co. who maintained the elevators at WTC and had restored service after the first bombing. This model was built for their trade show display at the Javits Center. As "on-line" model makers for the PANYNJ I can not even guess how many mile I put on WTC elevators while moving models up and down for deliveries, presentations and photo sessions. 

 

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Last edited by Todds Architectural Models

Today I look back to this little gem. I had lifted an image of a photoshopped elevation that all of us in the shop liked. I had just started getting more serious about modeling actual historic buildings, but this one was nowhere to be found. We forged ahead. Lots of part engineering and a Taskboard prototype, then on to the actual first model. Still trying to hold true to the original photograph, I came up with this base color for the brick. For some reason the "what are you thinking?" thought got overruled by the "you can always make it right" thought and I plowed ahead. When all was said and done, we had to put a bright blue cornice on and have a good laugh. Yes, it is that bright pink, a shadowbox that only a good father could love. No, the picture does not do her justice.

But wait, Barbie's Warehouse is available for your layout! And If you buy her, we'll add LED lighting for no charge if you mention "I want Barbie's Warehouse to light up my layout".

 

 

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Today I look back to this little gem. I had lifted an image of a photoshopped elevation that all of us in the shop liked. I had just started getting more serious about modeling actual historic buildings, but this one was nowhere to be found. We forged ahead. Lots of part engineering and a Taskboard prototype, then on to the actual first model. Still trying to hold true to the original photograph, I came up with this base color for the brick. For some reason the "what are you thinking?" thought got overruled by the "you can always make it right" thought and I plowed ahead. When all was said and done, we had to put a bright blue cornice on and have a good laugh. Yes, it is that bright pink, a shadowbox that only a good father could love. No, the picture does not do her justice.

But wait, Barbie's Warehouse is available for your layout! And If you buy her, we'll add LED lighting for no charge if you mention "I want Barbie's Warehouse to light up my layout".

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Still have that one, eh??? I think it would go beautifully with a post war Lionel Girls Set   

John- The plumber did not offer that pan. I will have to ask him if it can be retrofitted. The offending unit lasted 11 years. We are on well water and the pressure is abnormally high (well guy called) and that may have (prematurely) caused the failure. Looks like all of the Taskboard wicked up about 2/3 of the sheet height. When it dries out it will make good fire starter. Thankfully they are back to shipping product out. Usually right about now I am packing away the dehumidifier for the season. It will have a couple more weeks of service as the slab dries out. 

Doug, that's low class that the plumber didn't think to offer that pan, I've had a similar arrangement for water heaters for 30+ years!  The pan should come with the basic installation!  We all know that most water heaters do give out in time, so why have a ticking time bomb that's going to bite you some random day in the future!  My pan just drains into the channel around the basement, but that ends up getting to the sump pump.  Yes, I also have an alarm on that in case it croaks.

I hope you didn't loose too much in the process, I know it sucks to have water problems.

John- Actually the plumber did a great job. I came down to the basement and 3"-4" of water at 6AM. Between the Simer  submersible floor pump and the wet vac, I had most of the water out by about 8AM. Since I originally did not know the source, I wanted to get the water out so that when the plumber came, he could quickly find the source. He was called at 8:15, arrived at 8:45, diagnosed and ordered by 9:15, went handle another worse emergency than ours, and then had the new boiler installed by 3:30. They then pressure tested at a hose bib, discovered too high pressure, put in a pressure reducing regulator on the well output source for part cost only ("I am already here") and gave a recommendation for a well service person. Not the way I wanted my Wednesday to go, but as good as it could given the cards dealt.

How does your pan alert you? Is it a loud siren (what I would have needed between midnight and 6AM), a wireless connection to your smartphone,.......?

Well, the burst hot water tank set me back at least a week and a lot more material than I originally thought. The shop is just about dried out and the well pressure has been repaired last Thursday thanks to YouTube lessons (replacement of the pressure switch and pressure gauge). I was not comfortable with 150psi in the well tank! The well guy finally came yesterday and said that I did everything right. You all know the lesson: have your well serviced every year to included verification of the air pressure in the tank and functionality of switches and gauges.

Production is on hold until later this week when replacement material comes in. In the mean time I have been doing CAD work on the 6" deep (building) version of The Birthplace of Basketball and this little gem. Until a better name comes to mind it is Downtown Building #1, part of our CityScape series of buildings. The idea came from a customer and I decide to have a go at it. 

It will be about 25-1/2" tall and 9-1/2" wide. The first flat prototype is shown next to the original Pickwick Hotel shadowbox prototype. This new project will feature raster engraved stone joint lines which create a wider, more realistic joint. The edges of pieces will also be laser cut with ever-so-slight grooves so that the returns to the main elevation and window surfaces will way more realistic. See the close up sample below. The last picture is what we are shooting for. Shadowbox first, then the building. Several months away as I have to catch up on the backlog of orders, but food for thought. Any suggestions/recomendations/interest?

 

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CS-08 Midtown Building 1

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OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

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