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Okay, just for laughs...

I put the #33 on the bench and hooked up a volt meter to the leads of a Lionel type S transformer: it started in at about 6V and by 10V it was running about as fast as I'd want it to. (Interestingly enough, its performance is almost identical to a 1946 vintage S scale American Flyer #320 Hudson. I know this, because I checked.   )

The #10 didn't start to run until 9V; by 12V it was running as fast as needed; which is to say, fast enough.

In lieu of a video, I figured this would be the next best thing...

Mark in Oregon

Mark, I have a #10 but not a #33 to compare.  The #10 seems to be reasonably "slippery" in coasting after cutting power though not very much, especially when pulling it's cars.

You are correct in that they have different types of motors, and the difference may account for the additional coasting of the #33.  I haven't played with any of the Early Period locos so I have no experience.

Are you running the engines light or pulling a train?

I don’t have a super motor. But I do have a 33 locomotive that I do occasionally run when I have my standard gauge set up. I’ll be the first to say that the coasting that your 33 does is normal. Pretty much all 33 locomotives are fairly lightweight in the realm of Standard gauge trains. They don’t have very much meat on their bones like the zinc wheels, cast iron wheels, thick motor frames, etc. So I would not worry about the coasting. I don’t have a super motor to run, but I would say that it stops on a dime because it’s a lot more heavy than the 33.



                                                    Trainfam

Thanks for the replies. 🙂

I guess the best way to describe the difference is the "33" acts kinda like a typical post war Lionel engine (with the armature parallel to the track); you can very easily turn the wheels by hand, and there is that "coasting" effect.

Although the "10" can be rolled by hand, there is much more resistance and its performance is more like a worm-drive engine.

Since I don't know anything about Standard Gauge, I don't know if the difference in the two is typical. I'm not saying there's anything "wrong" with the "10"; I just am surprised by the difference... either way, they are both very cool machines.  😊

Mark in Oregon

If I may continue this "stream of consciousness" thread:

Regarding these "latch" couplers; I'm so used to Kadees I didn't know what to expect from these, much less how they operate. 🤔

As it turns out, they work surprisingly well...they look funny, but they do actually work! 😁

I also have a "318" on it's way, so you all were right about this stuff; it's hard to know when to quit!  😊

Mark in Oregon

Greenberg guides. They’re pretty good books especially for the starting collector. There are a few topics that aren’t covered in his standard gauge book. Most of these topics are obscure and rather rarely talked about such as the black and red primer series. Both were for a short stent of time red primer (1911-1912) black primer 1910… not to disparage Mr. Greenberg’s book.



                                                 Trainfam

@TrainFam posted:

Greenberg guides. They’re pretty good books especially for the starting collector. There are a few topics that aren’t covered in his standard gauge book. Most of these topics are obscure and rather rarely talked about such as the black and red primer series. Both were for a short stent of time red primer (1911-1912) black primer 1910… not to disparage Mr. Greenberg’s book.



                                                 Trainfam

The older books started Bruce down the path. They were very basic like the McComas series.  The latest offerings are JAM Packed with information... some obscure stuff had to be left out due to size of the books. The one thing that gives collectors the advantage with Bruces book is that the vast majority of items published have corroborations by well know, knowledgeable collectors, legitimizing (or disqualifying) a ton of stuff.

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