"Terminal Strips", Barrier Strips, and "Grounding Bars".

Those ancient Lionels around WWII were excellent, so long as used with external breakers on all circuits.  Do be aware that the internal breaker only cuts out the U post.  Separate breakers on each output is not adequate protection.

If the internal windings of a transformer can only take 10 amps, putting even a 5 amp fuse on each output would mean 20 amps are flowing through the windings.  The internal breaker would open at a total of 10 amps, if working.

Unlike the later made VW and ZW transformers, the early PW "V" and "Z" had a separate winding for each of the four outputs.  The later VW and ZW shared common windings, so the failure of one affected all four.  Also, the earlier "V" and "Z" were / are better for good source powering because, not being shared windings, and not sharing amperages, you have full amps from each post as listed, no drop due to having shared with other of the four output circuits.  I have more than one of each, the "V", "Z" and VW as well as ZW..... prefer the earlier models for better sustained supply.  IMO...….

Jesse   TCA 

Jesse, take a look at the type V & Z manual, with schematic, available on the olsentoy website.  They speak of it as having a 2 coils, one giving 6 volts, and the other 6-24 as tapped off.  The schematic shows 4 rollers running across the single 6-24 volt secondary.

The breaker opens the feed to U. Thus, there is no protection against a short between any of the A,B,C,D terminals.

http://pictures.olsenstoy.com/cd/transfmr/psv1.pdf

A lengthy srticle indicates that there were many internal changes to the V over the years it was in production:

http://www.jbgilmer.com/ToyTra...0V%20Transformer.pdf

coach joe posted:

On a more expensive note there are the "distribution Panels made by MTH.  very similar to barrier strips with jumpers. One hot and one neutral input and I believe 24 out puts of each hot and neutral.

coach Joe,

Those "distribution Panels made by MTH" are great - very easy to wire.  They do take up a lot of real estate though!  I have moved to doing most of my wiring on the slightly recessed 1" x 4" frame members for my train tables.  That way, I just pull the wires through the table, and do the wiring on the sides of the layout benchwork -- no more crawling under the tables.  The MTH distribution panels are too large for the 1" x 4" framework.

I will just put removable skirts around the layout, covering the wiring, but, giving ready access from the sides.

 

Cordially,  Dennis

The Water Level Route

On the subject of Wago connectors, for many years Ideal has had a line of similar connectors that do not have levers and are slightly smaller. 

Mucking around on the internet, I came across a video in which a man makes up a length of what appears to be 12-gauge wire, with a series of splices---wago connector, crimp connector, wire nut, Euto-style screw connector---and then fed 70+ amps through it for awhile.  Melted the insulation off the wire, and the Wago was the first connector to smoke.

RJR posted:

On the subject of Wago connectors, for many years Ideal has had a line of similar connectors that do not have levers and are slightly smaller. 

Mucking around on the internet, I came across a video in which a man makes up a length of what appears to be 12-gauge wire, with a series of splices---wago connector, crimp connector, wire nut, Euto-style screw connector---and then fed 70+ amps through it for awhile.  Melted the insulation off the wire, and the Wago was the first connector to smoke.

Found that video and watched it.   If the connector is still fine after the insulation has been charred off of the 12g wire,  thats a good sign it can handle the job.  Also, if the connection remained in tact after the 90amps of current burned the 12g wire in half, thats another good sign. 

The way he conducted the test was a little silly (although cool) because the 12g wire was basically converted into a stove top heating element.  So the wire itself was generating a tremendous amount of heat and was causing all of the plastic on the connectors to melt, and one couldnt be certain how much heat was being generated by the connector junctions themselves.   

Agree, MJCAT.

Supplementing my comment above, some years ago I was in discussions with a manufacturer of marine air conditioning units.  They advised me that the principal cause of problems was that crimp connectors would overheat & fail.  I have encountered that issue on marine a/c units, usually when a unit has been operating continuously for several days at about 17 amps on a12-gauge circuit.  On these units, I always replace crimped splices in a/c unit with an Ideal product that uses a metal ring with a set screw, over which a cap is screwed

Here is a small portion of the wiring that I have completed with the help of this thread.  For this location, I will next connect the yellow accessory wire to a bus bar.  Once the wiring is completed, I plan to cover this wiring with a skirt or easily removable facia board :

IMG_4396

Cordially,  Dennis

The Water Level Route

Attachments

Photos (1)

  It looks great but you missed securing the green wire loom Dennis.

 Also, to move stresses off connections of heavy, draped wire, push the bundle to the left thru the wire stay slightly and wrap the wire bundle with a small zip tie(s) tightly to the left of the wire stay so it's head will butt against the wire stay when released.

  Ideally the wires should sort of push at the terminals vs pull.  Any wire stress down the line to the right is now held at the wire stay vs the crimp connections. Loops of excess I hang on the run (the right).

A fun way to dress some minor excess slack is to wrap a few turns around a phillps screwdriver or pen to "shorten it" then pull to length, then pull the coils off the driver, and slowly pull it to length.

It's silly, but visually effective dress.

 

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





Adriatic posted:

IMG_20190204_211215~2

Hi Adriatic,

I enjoyed and appreciate both of your posts, and now have some time to implement your suggestions.  In this regard, your pen/Philips screwdriver suggestion made me smile! I used the red/burgundy colored Lionel solid wire for my Super "O" layout as a young boy, and frequently used a pencil to coil some wire to give me "wiggle room" if I later made a modest change to the location of an accessory.  (I still have a few lengths of that 1960's era "coiled" wire in my miscellaneous wire box!)

I still use this method occasionally under the table if I envision possibly moving something a short distance in the future.  That's a wonderful layout "Tip & Trick" that I should probably use occasionally on the 1"4" layout framing where I am now running most of my wiring, as you suggest.

Question: Should I just plan in the future to place the plastic "wire stays" slightly above each connection with the barrier strip where possible?  I generally have room on the 1" x 4" layout framing for this.

Finally, those wire "looms" were installed when I first started the wiring and I can probably eliminate them and use the pencil/pen tip and trick to replace the larger coils with a short 1" coil of wire.  In this regard, each of those white, red and green colored wires are for a mainline track connection, so I likely wanted some flexibility when I started my layout wiring back when I made the O.P.

Thanks again!

Cordially,  Dennis

The Water Level Route

Looms that are exposed get pulled on or bumped sooner or later, so yes. Would they survive without it? Maybe.

Ideally you dont want stress on the connection themselves, especially weight putting reversing torque on the screw heads. The vibrations will do their best to loosen a screw or two then. A crimp can't pull out if the stresses of an accidental yank are consentrated at a wire stay.

   Look at how heavy outdoor ac lines get terminated. A guy line comes from high off the pole and has a cable stay to hold the main weight of the long line off of any electrical connections. Looped slack being on the runs side gives it a beter chance to slack out under extreme pressures (tie loops ONCE just enough to hold loops reasonably, two will hang up uncoiling), less chance of wire damage, you just have to re-coil/re-tie.

 It's silly but the "real pigtail"(?) does garner smiles from folks that would never look twice at electrical too.

  We'd be assessed by non-techs for general order, cleanliness, etc.. This touch was a secret weapon to draw a bored eye away from something minor missed (usually by assistants) ....surprise visit protection  

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





Adriatic posted:

"Ideally you dont want stress on the connection themselves, especially weight putting reversing torque on the screw heads. The vibrations will do their best to loosen a screw or two then. A crimp can't pull out if the stresses of an accidental yank are concentrated at a wire stay."

That's helpful, and will be useful information for many different circumstances including this specific one.  It also makes very logical sense after better understanding the issue, and thinking about the various forces at play over time.

Cordially,  Dennis

The Water Level Route

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