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Hollsc posted:

FOLLOW THE ARROWS!!  Nothing worse than everyone going down the right way and some clown walking the wrong way down the aisle usually carrying some huge box knocking into everyone.  Its not that hard to realize you're the only one walking the opposite direction but some people seem blind to that fact obviously.

It's like the urban legend of the guy talking to his wife on the phone as he drives home.

She tells him to be careful as on the news there is some idiot driving the wrong way on the road he takes home all the time.

He says, it's not just one, it's ALL of them! 

On buying tca member are required to place a reproduction orange tag on a non original train or item, if in doubt get someone from the standards committee  to verify it is original, this protects the buyer and seller and future disputes.this is a professional organization and has strict by laws that all members must adhere to. 

On buying tca member are required to place a reproduction orange tag on a non original train or item, if in doubt get someone from the standards committee  to verify it is original, this protects the buyer and seller and future disputes.this is a professional organization and has strict by laws that all members must adhere to

True, but I wouldn't rely on those stickers. I have seen plenty of refinished trains and reproduction parts at York that do not have them. Sure one can get someone from the standards committee, but who wants to spend the time?
Why aren't these items marked? ..... I don't know. I prefer to think that the seller doesn't know their item isn't original.

If you are interested in purchasing costly items, it is best to know what you are purchasing.

Last edited by C W Burfle

Some folks here like to take stuff way out of context,  I said fun, I am not going to give anyone a hard time unless they give it to me. I was going to offer him 600.00 for the engine just to see if he would take it. where did I say I was going to confront anyone?  Chip on my shoulder, no not me.  

Lighten up. I am going to York in five minutes to have a lot of fun. so .

Big Bad John.

Some folks here like to take stuff way out of context,  I said fun, I am not going to give anyone a hard time. I was going to offer him 600.00 for the engine just to see if he would take it. where did I say I was going to confront anyone?  Chip on my shoulder, no not me.  

Lighten up. I am going to York in five minutes to have a lot of fun. so .

Big Bad John.

Michael Hokkanen posted:

One thing I know for sure, if you see something you really want - buy it.If you decide to "think about it" and go back you will either not find the spot again and/or it will have been SOLD!

Sage advice, IMO, judging from my experience as a seller. I had a one-of-a-kind (all of my work is) item for sale @$700. A very pleasant gentleman (who later became a client) wanted that particular Insta-Rama  very much, but struggled over whether to get it or not. Well, my personal philosophy as a vendor with his own "cottage industriousness" has consistently been that I will not  aggressively urge/plead/suggest/entreat/push/encourage anybody to make a purchase. What you see is what you, and indeed do, get. The judgement is the customer's, of course, and each item for sale is accompanied only by pleasant and friendly conversation, and not one word of "pushing".

I did, however, suggest that leaving a deposit would hold it for him, reminding him of what was stated on my signs, that I do not repeat any scene I have made. He walked away saying "No, thanks'" to the deposit suggestion but assured me he "would think about it." ("Holding" something for a prospective customer is not my custom - one never knows what wonders await every buyer down the aisles, causing them not to return.) The moment  he stepped out of my booth (Orange Hall) and had gotten only several steps down the aisle on his way to the restroom, another prospective customer, who had been witnessing the whole scenario, stepped up and said, gesturing toward the item in question, "Sold, I'll take it." It was packaged-up and gone before the original customer, several hours later, had returned and found himself disappointed and dismayed (From that first encounter, he bought his first and the next twenty+ such items on-the-spot and often had me hand-deliver them to his home on Long Island.)

Even though I am not at York this time, I suggest that your advice, Michael, is sound. There seems very often (or almost always) somebody else interested in the same stuff you are, and they are not going to wait for you to make up your mind to return.

FrankM

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Last edited by Moonson

Because.

One thing I dislike is disrespect from either the seller or buyer.  At last Saturday's show I had a brand new $135 Woodland Scenics custom building literally just cut out of its box with an $85 price tag.  Some bottom feeder insisted I needed to sell it to him for $80.  I just ignored him, repriced it at $95 and someone purchased it in front of him.  Sweet.

Tom Tee posted:

Because.

One thing I dislike is disrespect from either the seller or buyer.  At last Saturday's show I had a brand new $135 Woodland Scenics custom building literally just cut out of its box with an $85 price tag.  Some bottom feeder insisted I needed to sell it to him for $80.  I just ignored him, repriced it at $95 and someone purchased it in front of him.  Sweet.

$5 off is hardly a bottom feeder but if it makes your blood boil, spare yourself and others and write FIRM if you aren't willing to negotiate.

A few years ago, I found a beautiful hand built model of the HellGate bridge for sale in the Orange Hall. I told the builder that I thought he deserved more than the $325. he was asking for it, but assured him I would treasure it. He seemed  pleased that it was going to someone who appreciated it. It's on display in my bedroom, since my layout is too small for it. It has a personal appeal to me since I travel over the real one about 8 times a year.

ibrewtoo posted:
Tom Tee posted:

Because.

One thing I dislike is disrespect from either the seller or buyer.  At last Saturday's show I had a brand new $135 Woodland Scenics custom building literally just cut out of its box with an $85 price tag.  Some bottom feeder insisted I needed to sell it to him for $80.  I just ignored him, repriced it at $95 and someone purchased it in front of him.  Sweet.

$5 off is hardly a bottom feeder but if it makes your blood boil, spare yourself and others and write FIRM if you aren't willing to negotiate.

...or don't haul your stuff to a train meet.  

Rather than responding with ill will, "Thanks, but that's my rock-bottom price" would work a lot better.

On a completely unrelated note, I recently respectfully offered a guy what I thought was a fair price for an item on his table.  He was a total jerk - completely ignored me and put a higher price on his item.  People like that make my blood boil.  If I was that thin-skinned, I'd quit going to train meets.  

Here's a real train-show story from Wheaton many years ago.  Guy had a fairly common item that was grossly overpriced.  I looked at it and made a reasonable opening offer.  He replied "I didn't bring my stuff here to have people try to jew me down (yeah, that was his exact phrase); this isn't a garage sale".  I was so stunned that I just put it down and walked away.  I still kick myself for not ripping into him about the ethnic slur and remind him that it was indeed a swap meet.  I also should have thrown the item at him.   

Bob posted:
Joe Hohmann posted:
Mallard4468 posted:
remind him that it was indeed a swap meet.  I also should have thrown the item at him.   

Where did the term "Swap meet" ever come from? I've never seen any swapping going on.

Lots of people swap their cash for trains at these things...

And their sensibility, rational thought, good judgment, etc..................

Having been a booth-holder (Orange Hall) at York, since 2005, has afforded me the following perspective. Fellow hobbyists bought everything I ever made. I considered that a privilege. Mr. R. Kughn was a customer. Lionel was a client, all due to my displaying my work @ York. And having a booth there gave me an opportunity to enjoy the company of fellow hobbyists and of others on this forum who became repeat-customers. It was enjoyable being pleasant because it was the truth for me. I like being nice. It feels a whole lot better than being a snot.

FrankM.

Layout Refinements

Last edited by Moonson
laz1957 posted:

Have a pocket full of change for the bathroom attendants.

That bathroom attendant stuff is a shake-down.   I have been to various other events in those York Fairgrounds buildings throughout the years.   There are NO bathroom attendants... but yet the restrooms are clean & well maintained.  Go figure!

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