There is this unsightly obstruction above my shelf RR which needs hiding.  I am deciding between a  5 mm plywood shell with building fronts or spraying the whole area in ISO foam and carving a hillside.

Bare in mind my approach to RRing is somewhat casual, only looking to hide ugly,

If building fronts in mind, recommended sources?

Site as it is today.  This town covers a series of 16' long staging tracks:

IMG_9010

Pre layout construction view of drain pipe when train room was a shop:

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Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

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If it were me, I would certainly put the whole thing in a tunnel through an escarpment--probably extending as a slope all the way down to the station level. I would put tall vegetation around the vertical part of the drain.

--pete

 

 

My heart is warm with the friends I make, 

And better friends I'll not be knowing;

Yet there isn't a train I wouldn't take,

No matter where it's going.

                        Edna St. Vincent Millay

 

I think I'd box it in and fill in between the two vertical boxes with display shelving. The side and bottom boxing would thus create a picture-frame effect around the display shelves. A faux top box would complete the effect.

Lew

 

Lew

 

Operator of the Plywood Empire Route in the Beautiful Berkshires

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

Mike CT posted:

There is a clean out opening, that needs to be accessible.  Lower level pipe.   The equipment used to open a clogged drain requires a fair amount of room, can make a large mess.  IMO.  Something to consider.  

As Mike says, this needs to be clear both for Plumber access AND the horrid mess it makes if they have to go in there!   Paint it to match the wall and keep the layout at least 2 feet or more from the wall.

Have you thought about getting a backdrop from backdrop warehouse or other vender and make a simple frame, or make several sections so middle section opened for the plumbing cleanout if ever needed?

Paradise & Pacific Railroad

I would move the layout too. Murphy's Law says that when the day comes that you need to have that line snaked out you will be in tears by the time the plumber is done.

And the tears will be from when you see his bill for having to crawl under the layout to access the pipe.

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

Well Tom, it's too late to do what I did. When I built my house, I knew the sewer line was going to be a problem, and interfere with the layout and another room in the basement, so I ran it up against the foundation on the outside. The run is about 80'. In nearly 20 years, I've only ever had one problem with  it, and that happened within the first year. The pipe broke because a large rock had been in the back fill, and settled on the pipe. That was an expensive lesson!

Back to your situation, I do see a possibility, but it makes the problem worse before it gets better. You could extend the pipe where the clean out is, to a point beyond the layout on the right, then just do a new clean out on the end of the extension. Then you can cover the whole mess, while preserving the access.

Out of curiosity, have you ever needed to use the clean out? If you haven't, then there's a very low probability that you ever would, but better safe than sorry. BTW, I did all my own plumbing on my house, and everything works great, with the exception of the occasional toilet clog. I was confident enough that the system was good, that I sheet rocked  over all three clean outs in that 80' run. Gravity works!

Is that plastic or cast? Plastic is easier. Maybe it doesn't matter. If you can get a male threaded piece to match the plug, then just screw it into the existing, and put the new clean out on the other end. If you could move the layout out 6" it would be perfect! 

Folks, it looks to me as if the cleanout is actually below table level, thus accessible from under the layout. I can't be quite certain because need a pic showing the cleanest with they tableware in place.

Also, too, that is cast iron pipe and that cleanout plug is probably locked in place from corrosion of the threads.

Lew

Lew

 

Operator of the Plywood Empire Route in the Beautiful Berkshires

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

geysergazer posted:

Folks, it looks to me as if the cleanout is actually below table level, thus accessible from under the layout. I can't be quite certain because need a pic showing the cleanest with they tableware in place.

Also, too, that is cast iron pipe and that cleanout plug is probably locked in place from corrosion of the threads.

Lew

Oops, I get it now. The second picture has nothing to do with the current layout, and just shows the bigger plumbing situation. Moving the layout isn't an option, as it is attached to the wall. 

A pipe is easy can you tell I hide in this photo behind the Crusader hotel it is a tankless hot water system building was built in L shape lighting is banana plugged to bench work wiring and backdrop is 3 screws to the frame and you have full access.

DSC04438

 

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Elliott is correct, the lower photo is only for an overall view.  I wrote off ever using the clean out shown.

Our home is rather long and we have a 4" tee at the mid point of the front basement wall.  I am accustomed to sewer line clearing.  I also do sewer line replacements.  If  worse came to worse,  I would just saw out the cast iron and slide in some schedule 40.  No problem.

I really appreciate the ideas mentioned, and am open for more.  Thank you!

Incidently, when splicing in plastic I find it best to embed the cut off end of cast iron in a sonotube formed concrete  pillar over 1/2" S.S. extended studs threaded into the the wall and floor.   This way you can preserve leaded connections prior to removing the old cast iron pipe.

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Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

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I have a mountain in one corner of my layout that hides a 4” cast iron vent pipe.  The mountain is modular and can be removed in sections, not so much for access to the vent pipe, but more so for access to any derailments.  I used spray foam for part of the mountain that I previously had in this spot.  Not much fun to work with.  If you do go with a hillside, I would recommend constructing it using rigid foam, but if you want to try the spray foam, I would cover everything with saran wrap first so that someday the spray foam can be removed.

2016-01-09-5029 [2)2016-01-12-50322016-02-20-51062016-02-20-51092016-02-21-51402016-03-24-5189

Bob

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