I was lucky enough to schedule throttletime on N&W 475 for 10/19. I have been on their site but can't find any info on what is actually going to occur. I know where and what time to be there but don't know what to expect. Will I be running all the way to their station? Is it the engine by itself or pulling cars? I'm asking because my family knows that this is a "bucket list" item for me and they all want to witness it. I don't want 10 people coming to PA from diff. parts of the country if they can't witness this special event. Thanks for any responses.

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Trainmstr posted:

I was lucky enough to schedule throttletime on N&W 475 for 10/19. I have been on their site but can't find any info on what is actually going to occur. I know where and what time to be there but don't know what to expect. Will I be running all the way to their station? Is it the engine by itself or pulling cars? I'm asking because my family knows that this is a "bucket list" item for me and they all want to witness it. I don't want 10 people coming to PA from diff. parts of the country if they can't witness this special event. Thanks for any responses.

Have you tried phoning them and ASK?

Wear good work boots, long pants, long sleeves, a cap if you wish and have a pair of work gloves. You are going to have the time of your life and it will be over much too soon. I did this during the first round at Spencer and will never forget it. The 611 is so responsive.  I despise the term awesome but the whole experience was AWESOME !

George Lasley

I would guess the engine would be run light, so you won't have to worry about using the automatic brake and bailing off the independent.

Gloves are a must. Regular cheap leather gardening gloves are fine.

Memorize your basic whistle signals so you don't sound like a noob.

Steve

 

SJC posted:
smd4 posted:

Oh, one other thing: Don't mention to anyone on this side of the Atlantic that you "drove" a train.

 

I know, right? That's exactly my reaction whenever I hear someone say they drove a train. At that point, I usually just get in my car and sail away.

Steve

 

Running the engine light will be fairly straightforward with just the engine brake, throttle and reverse quadrant to deal with. Just start down in the corner after first opening the cylinder cocks, and then gradually hook up to get the right cutoff so as not to overwork the machinery. Some throttle valves are tighter than others, so get the feel of it so you do not spin the drivers. Your fireman should take care of the water and monitor the steam pressure, but you should have an injector on your side as well if needed. Be SAFE and have fun!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Tinplate Art posted:

Running the engine light will be fairly straightforward with just the engine brake, throttle and reverse quadrant to deal with. Just start down in the corner after first opening the cylinder cocks, and then gradually hook up to get the right cutoff so as not to overwork the machinery.

Actually hooking up the valve gear on a light engine is definitely NOT recommended! The throttle would NOT be that far open anyway, and keeping her "in the corner" provides the much needed Cushing of the piston and running gear machinery.

Some throttle valves are tighter than others, so get the feel of it so you do not spin the drivers. Your fireman should take care of the water and monitor the steam pressure, but you should have an injector on your side as well if needed. Be SAFE and have fun!

 

One professional tip:

To brake a light engine smoothly, test the independent brake after you get rolling.  See how quickly the brakes apply and release in response to your movement of the independent brake valve.  There's always some lag.  That will let you know when to begin braking and releasing.  There is a lot of variation in this from one design of locomotive to another, even with diesels.  When braking to a stop, always be releasing part of the brake cylinder pressure as the locomotive approaches the point of stop.  This is where that test you made will serve you well.  Don't just jam the brakes all the way on, so to speak.  And try never to be increasing the brake cylinder pressure as you come to a stop.  Do that after you stop.  Even if you don't get the result you want the first time you stop, learn from it and do better on your second stop.  You can do it.  Mentally plan ahead.  Have fun!

Let us know how well this worked for you.

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

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