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@Bruce Brown posted:

Here is another seller of the pads. Frankly, I never had an easy time replacing the pads. A few years ago in a magazine article, someone came up with a modification to make it easier to swap pads but I never quite understood it!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/334127451665

I wonder what makes that dozen pads worth $5 more than the two dozen in the other ad!

@Nov posted:

Do most of you use goo gone, alcohol or something else on the front pad?  I just bought one a couple days ago and would appreciate the info.  

I use Goo Gone and also added a couple of adhesive wheel weights to the two top plates to increase pressure on the rails. Weights are available at Harbour Freight as well as auto parts stores and ebay.

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Have you seen this chart? The best solvents for track cleaning are the non-polar solvents, the cleaning job lasts much longer. There's a whole article that describes the chemistry of the issue.

Polar vs. non-Polar Solvents

John,

It took me a little time to find this, I have copies but thought I would post a link to the article in MRH, it starts on page 9.  I have used this, with mineral spirits, with good success.

https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws...ay/online/index.html

Ray

Last edited by Rayin"S"
@Rayin"S" posted:

It took me a little time to find this, I have copies but thought I would post a link to the article in MRH, it starts on page 9.  I have used this, with mineral spirits, with good success.

https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws...ay/online/index.html

Ray

I had an old-timer tell me once that mineral spirits were the way to go for track cleaning, effective and very cheap, and he couldn't understand why anyone would use anything else. Looks like the chart shows him to have been right - very effective, reasonably usable in household settings (with odorless mineral spirits), and cheap.

Last edited by breezinup

There is no universal agreement in the O, HO or N-Gauge world on the best track cleaning methods. After 100+ years of operating model trains, there is still is no consensus.

Track cleaning falls into two broad categories: 1) abrasive and 2) chemical solvents. Within each group, cleaning can be accomplished manually or with a track cleaning car.

All the methods listed below are proven to work with normally dirty track.

Abrasive Track Cleaners:



Chemicals & Solvents. There are plenty of argumentative tradeoffs to be made with cleaning effectiveness, odor & noxious gases, evaporation time; flammability, residue, effect on rubber tires & plastics, tendency to attract dirt, cancer and reproductive warnings, degreasing ability, conductivity, and ventilation ability in train room. Some cleaning methods may require two steps—one solvent initially cleans the track and a different solvent removes any of the initial cleaner residue. Here the more popular ones. Each one has its proponents and detractors. Some may be banned in California. The spray solvents should be first sprayed on a cloth or pad to prevent accidental contact with non-metal surfaces.





Track Cleaning Cars:



Last edited by Bruce Brown
@RJR posted:
BJB:  Thanks for advising forumites of flammability.

Well, he missed a few of those notifications.   I've added them in red.

@Bruce Brown posted:

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