gftiv posted:

We had a whole wall that we installed book shelves on. The wall was the support for the book shelves. The wall started to move. Make sure your wall can support the weight you are hanging on it.

Sounds like your carpenter took some shortcuts.  I can’t imagine that happening with most walls. 

George

We bought  a used house and the basement was drywalled. This was on a outside wall of poured concrete. Firring strips were put on the concrete and the drywall next. some of the firring strips started to pull away from the wall. Firring strips and drywall were never meant to support that kind of load. 2x4 stud might have done much better.

gftiv posted:

We bought  a used house and the basement was drywalled. This was on a outside wall of poured concrete. Firring strips were put on the concrete and the drywall next. some of the firring strips started to pull away from the wall. Firring strips and drywall were never meant to support that kind of load. 2x4 stud might have done much better.

That’s not the proper way to remodel a basement. I wonder if it’s code? I assume they were glued to the wall, not shot. When I did remodeling as a contractor, we built a stud wall and nailed it to a treated wood base plate that was shot into the floor. We nailed the top plate to the floor joists. Behind the wall was foil faced ridged insulation. The wall would have standard electrical in conduit. Those walls aren’t coming down easy. 

George

I noticed that the trains block the circuit breaker box in one photo. This is a NEC violation. its unsafe.  You need access to the box esp if something goes wrong.  min distance in front of box should be 30" clear.   A transformer starts to burn and you need to shut off the circuit you got a big problem. I suggest you think about installing the box on the outside of the building in a NEMA 3 or better box.  

DougB posted:

I noticed that the trains block the circuit breaker box in one photo. This is a NEC violation. its unsafe.  You need access to the box esp if something goes wrong.  min distance in front of box should be 30" clear.   A transformer starts to burn and you need to shut off the circuit you got a big problem. I suggest you think about installing the box on the outside of the building in a NEMA 3 or better box.  

LOL!  I don't believe I have ever seen a breaker box with 30 feet clear in front of the box in any building that I have ever been in, including 50 story office buildings that I have inspected for work.

Nation Wide Lines posted:
DougB posted:

I noticed that the trains block the circuit breaker box in one photo. This is a NEC violation. its unsafe.  You need access to the box esp if something goes wrong.  min distance in front of box should be 30" clear.   A transformer starts to burn and you need to shut off the circuit you got a big problem. I suggest you think about installing the box on the outside of the building in a NEMA 3 or better box.  

LOL!  I don't believe I have ever seen a breaker box with 30 feet clear in front of the box in any building that I have ever been in, including 50 story office buildings that I have inspected for work.

30 " = 30 inches. 30' = 30 feet.

Pretty much every manufacturing/factory building I've worked in has some sort of tape on the floor in front of any large electrical panels stating not to put anything there.  Now, do people sometimes put things there when they shouldn't, possibly.  But they have always been marked.

-Dave

George S posted:
gftiv posted:

We bought  a used house and the basement was drywalled. This was on a outside wall of poured concrete. Firring strips were put on the concrete and the drywall next. some of the firring strips started to pull away from the wall. Firring strips and drywall were never meant to support that kind of load. 2x4 stud might have done much better.

That’s not the proper way to remodel a basement. I wonder if it’s code? I assume they were glued to the wall, not shot. When I did remodeling as a contractor, we built a stud wall and nailed it to a treated wood base plate that was shot into the floor. We nailed the top plate to the floor joists. Behind the wall was foil faced ridged insulation. The wall would have standard electrical in conduit. Those walls aren’t coming down easy. 

George

I'm sure codes vary.  Here's a video of Tom Silva doing the firring strip method.  I did this on one wall in my old basement because it gained me a couple inches in the finished space.  I needed every available inch for a 4.5 x 9 pool table.

MikeH

gftiv posted:

We bought  a used house and the basement was drywalled. This was on a outside wall of poured concrete. Firring strips were put on the concrete and the drywall next. some of the firring strips started to pull away from the wall. Firring strips and drywall were never meant to support that kind of load. 2x4 stud might have done much better.

You can stud out a wall over this using 2x3's. With drywall you would only loose a little over 3 inches of basement space.

This happened 30 years ago in Iowa. Many people did their own basement renovations however they felt like. You assume your drywall basement is done properly. Properly is expensive. Take an electrical outlet cover off and check out your drywall to see what you have.

gftiv posted:

This happened 30 years ago in Iowa. Many people did their own basement renovations however they felt like. You assume your drywall basement is done properly. Properly is expensive. Take an electrical outlet cover off and check out your drywall to see what you have.

I always assume it was done by a total hack.  Never been disappointed!

MikeH

DougB posted:

I noticed that the trains block the circuit breaker box in one photo. This is a NEC violation. its unsafe.  You need access to the box esp if something goes wrong.  min distance in front of box should be 30" clear.   A transformer starts to burn and you need to shut off the circuit you got a big problem. I suggest you think about installing the box on the outside of the building in a NEMA 3 or better box.  

I put a bamboo screen room divider in front of mine to hide it from the room. There is plenty of clearance and you can just push the room divider aside. I don't have any transformers in my panel though. I never heard of that in residential applications. The meter is outside, and I believe that is where the 3 phase is split to 2 phase. 

George

MikeH posted:
George S posted:
gftiv posted:

We bought  a used house and the basement was drywalled. This was on a outside wall of poured concrete. Firring strips were put on the concrete and the drywall next. some of the firring strips started to pull away from the wall. Firring strips and drywall were never meant to support that kind of load. 2x4 stud might have done much better.

That’s not the proper way to remodel a basement. I wonder if it’s code? I assume they were glued to the wall, not shot. When I did remodeling as a contractor, we built a stud wall and nailed it to a treated wood base plate that was shot into the floor. We nailed the top plate to the floor joists. Behind the wall was foil faced ridged insulation. The wall would have standard electrical in conduit. Those walls aren’t coming down easy. 

George

I'm sure codes vary.  Here's a video of Tom Silva doing the firring strip method.  I did this on one wall in my old basement because it gained me a couple inches in the finished space.  I needed every available inch for a 4.5 x 9 pool table.

Looks like Tom used 4" long concrete spikes to anchor the initial firing strips. Those wouldn't pull out from the wall. That looks like a suitable method. You should be able to hang loaded shelves on a wall like that. I suspect the do-it-yourself prior Iowa homeowner glued the firing strips to the concrete. Construction glue doesn't have a high sheer rating, at least in a concrete to wood application. We used to use it to mount spikes on the concrete and the spikes would hold the rigid foam insulation. We weren't trying to hang drywall on them.

George

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