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Went to train show in Islip Long Island yesterday thanks to a reply from this forum. Picked up a load of junk according to my wife but she knows I love train "junk". I have almost all parts to restore from other junk I have picked up over the years.

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Last edited by Rich Melvin
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Jim,

I normally have two tables at this show, but did not yesterday, Good people run it, the Central Operating Lines (COL) club.

As respects to buying "junk", it is one of my favorite things to do when it comes to pre-war tinplate. Below are pics of a Standard gauge set I made a couple years ago - average price paid for these cars was $15. Seven junkers yielded these five cars and a roadside diner.

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I also made this Standard gauge Diner (In honor of my baby brother, Buddy, who passed two years ago at the young age of 56) from a left over junker :

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Don't let 'em laugh at you for buying "junk" - but please save some for me!

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I wouldn't be involved with O-gauge and tinplate if it wasn't for the affordable "junk" that I can repair to build fun operable vintage trains. Sunday afternoons are bargain time. Occasionally, vendors just leave their unsold stuff behind with a "FREE" sign. Don't knock it !

But I haven't been to a train show since 2019 because of  Covid, and am wary of the future. I honestly don't need any more train stuff at this point, anyhow. I have a backlog of parts and projects.

Last edited by Ace

I'm with John.  Please save some for me !!

Depending on my mood at the time, I'd have paid at least $20, maybe 40.

I see bodies for a Lionel 150 series and another that I think is not Ives or Lionel - wrong shape cooling grids at corners of the hoods.  Problem with those is that it's easier to get bodies than motors.  In my awaiting restoration collection now are 13 bodies and only 10 motors of that vintage of Lionel engines.

But the piece de resistance is the three 604 observations..  If all six insets are there then all you need are trucks, couplers, window material, paint and observation platforms to do a  good restoration - the hard part is finding observation platforms.  Hennings has repros for the 612 - just checked my 612 and 604 and find those railings to have same dimensions and slight difference in the tabs, so they could be used.

Right now I'm restoring the 603-603-604 Red Comet.  Dry transfers are available for those cars from J&A and each set can do two observations.

Last edited by Rich Melvin
@Lionelski posted:

Jim,

I normally have two tables at this show, but did not yesterday, Good people run it, the Central Operating Lines (COL) club.

As respects to buying "junk", it is one of my favorite things to do when it comes to pre-war tinplate. Below are pics of a Standard gauge set I made a couple years ago - average price paid for these cars was $15. Seven junkers yielded these five cars and a roadside diner.

IMG_6591IMG_6592

I also made this Standard gauge Diner (In honor of my baby brother, Buddy, who passed two years ago at the young age of 56) from a left over junker :

IMG_6593

Don't let 'em laugh at you for buying "junk" - but please save some for me!

@Lionelski posted:

Michaet T,

All of my custom cars (including the samples shown in my post earlier today, above), engines and buildings are rattle can painted.

No need for an airbrush.

John .......really nice work.

I use the airbrush for my work .......you are an artist with those rattle cans. 🤓

My wife calls ALL my trains my junk. She once said to me, "What am I supposed to do with all your junk if you go before me? I replied, "Just buy three or four extra burial plots and put the trains in beside me!" At which point she asked, "Where will I be?" I responded, "You'll be WAY OVER on the other side of the trains!" I never knew that being hit by a flying locomotive would hurt so much! Ha!

@gene maag posted:

I love Junk...Here is a Diner from a Lionel 610 car and my favorite Train a Lionel 259E and all the cars came from junk boxes...the milk car was a tender and the baggage cars roof was extended with wire and Bondex to fit the car

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Sometimes ( very rare ) I  think this hobby might just be a little too much like just toys ............but when I see something like this it takes on a different life.............people from different walks of life who don't make a huge financial  living from creative art.....are delving into the creative art world in a very special way. 😉

For me, rescuing and restoring a junker is one of the most satisfying parts of the hobby.  I model 3R Scale, but the beauty of tinplate has its own appeal.  Here is a 259E that I restored in Milwaukee colors.  The steps are pretty basic and no airbrush required:  Strip the old paint, steel wool, prime, bake, paint, bake.  Polish the copper and brass with a Dremel, assemble, clear coat, bake.  Paints are Train Enamel rattle cans from Charles Wood and Krylon.  The "oven" is a cardboard box (safety note -  I never set it to bake and walk away.  It does not get too hot, but you never know . . .)

Bob

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@RRDOC posted:

For me, rescuing and restoring a junker is one of the most satisfying parts of the hobby.  I model 3R Scale, but the beauty of tinplate has its own appeal.  Here is a 259E that I restored in Milwaukee colors.  The steps are pretty basic and no airbrush required:  Strip the old paint, steel wool, prime, bake, paint, bake.  Polish the copper and brass with a Dremel, assemble, clear coat, bake.  Paints are Train Enamel rattle cans from Charles Wood and Krylon.  The "oven" is a cardboard box (safety note -  I never set it to bake and walk away.  It does not get too hot, but you never know . . .)

Bob

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2020-02-29 21.47.19

Hello Bob,

Very nicely done as the finished project looks great.

For your baking process, what wattage bulbs are you using and typically how long do you bake the painted items?

Thanks!

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