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For what it is worth, I subscribed to Klambach's digital subscription at trains.com and now have access to every railroad publication they offer going back to the first issues.  In the case of Model Railroader and Trains that goes back to the 30's.  For the price it was well worth it and I cleared out 15 crates of magazines I was saving.

Good luck with obtaining the article!  As part of a collection of resources I was gifted I have several books on Civil War railroads.  While it not an era I model, it is interesting reading.

@GG1 4877 posted: ...snip...

books on Civil War railroads.  While it not an era I model, it is interesting reading.

It would be kind of difficult to explain the GG1s hauling trainloads of the Confederate gold out of Richmond. BTW, those trains stopped behind where I now live and hid that gold in the woods; I just have not found it yet!

Last edited by PRRMP54
@PH1975 posted:

Tom - I believe the Trains magazine article you may be looking for is on pages 34-37 of the July 2013 edition and is entitled "The Second Battle of GETTYSBURG" with the subtitle "How a railroad moved 54,000 aging veterans to a reunion on a single track line in the course of eight days."

Hope that helps.

I am having trouble figuring out why this would have been considered a Herculean task.  By the time of the 1913 Reunion the rail situation at Gettysburg had changed significantly from the single stub line of 1863.  IIRC by 1913 Reunion Gettysburg was served by a Western Maryland through line and a Reading stub.  The Pennsylvania had a couple of lines nearby to the east and the B&O and N&W had lines to the west that could act as feeders. 

@Bill N posted:

I am having trouble figuring out why this would have been considered a Herculean task.  By the time of the 1913 Reunion the rail situation at Gettysburg had changed significantly from the single stub line of 1863.  IIRC by 1913 Reunion Gettysburg was served by a Western Maryland through line and a Reading stub.  The Pennsylvania had a couple of lines nearby to the east and the B&O and N&W had lines to the west that could act as feeders.

The article outlines the needs to provide for 54,000 in attendance now aged 65 to 75 years old who life expectancy was 50!!  yes rails were used extensively for transportation, meal preparation, and to provide set up living facilities for the length of the reunion!  No computers to aid in the logistics!!  Every time I see a steam locomotive I marvel how someone sat down with pencil and paper to bring  these machines to life!!

Back issue received!!   Here is some information from the article:   "the second battle of Gettysburg by Wayne Laeapple" 

At the time of reunion rail service sent 4 trains daily between Harrisburg and Gettysburg rail service was upgraded by adding sidings to the single line a peak of 65 trains per day during the event!!

The US Army Quarter Masters Corp erected 6,592 8 man tents on 280 acre site, installed sewer and water lines, built 90 latrines with "seating for 3476" , set up 173 field kitchens, and a 200'X450' tent  that would seat 14,000!

Staffing for event was by 1500 Soldiers with assistance by Boy scouts from  various troops.

The first day 168,000 meals were served by a staff of 2170.

For cooking and baking the kitchens used 720 chords of wood and more than 9 tons of coal!

The age of veterans ranged from 61 to 112! with average age being 71!  Sadly 9 veterans died during the event as it was very hot and humid during the event.

I and family have visited the area many times and always learned/discovered something new!!  We have slowed down a bit as I approach "4 score"  our travel has decreased!!   

@Tom weaver posted:

I and family have visited the area many times and always learned/discovered something new!!  We have slowed down a bit as I approach "4 score"  our travel has decreased!!   

I can definitely relate to learning something new each time as I make 8-10 trips a year.  I'm a direct descendant of a Gettysburg veteran as my great-great-great grandfather fought there and my son presently attends Gettysburg College.  Our trips to move him in and out each semester and attend his various concerts and performances are an easy excuse to wander the battlefields during down time.  While I have no evidence that my great (x3) Grandfather attended that reunion he very well could have.

He served in the PA 27th Infantry and has his name engraved on the PA Monument.

John Houser Name

He lied about his age when he enlisted - he was only 15 but stood 6 feet tall so he obviously looked older.    He mustered in on 8/1/1861 and mustered out on 8/5/1864 outside of Atlanta having survived the duration of the war despite his unit suffering a 75% loss rate of the original muster.   An interesting note is the name prior to his (blue X).   The two of them obviously became good friends as my great (x3) grandfather married Michael's sister.   This was quite the exception as my great (x3) grandfather was Catholic and Michael's family was strict Lutheran and it was extremely rare for them to marry outside of the faith (especially women). 

Regardless, the undertaking to support the reunion was nothing less than a herculean effort considering the period of history and limited infrastructure of the area at the time.

-Greg

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