California Zephyr as food court at Disney's California Adventure Park

I stumbled on this little tangent recently and thought it was worth sharing because of the nice photographs and details that the article provides.  The parent website covers the history of Disney park features that are no longer. Here's a summary of the relevant train and food bits; click the links for the photos and full story.

From 2001 to 2011, the California Adventure Park in Anaheim, CA had a non-operational EMD FP7 cab to which they added a rear section and Disney-manufactured streamliner cars that served food. The observation car at the end sold toys.   The FP7 cab was built in 1952 for the Canadian National Railway as #9104. They rebuilt it in 1973 as #9165, and retired it in 1989. Disney picked it up in Illinois in 1990.

The article says that the park numbered the cab "804-A" in Western Pacific livery after the last Chicago to Oakland run in 1970.  But, the article says that this wasn't the actual engine because that engine was wrecked in 1972. (Various Wikipedia mentions about "804-A" seem to dispute that.  I'll leave the investigation to others.)  The Disney Company donated the cab to the Western Pacific Railroad Museum, Portola, CA, for their "Zephyr Project".  There's a photo of the cab's removal as part of the story:  The full "Yesterland" story and photos

Here's the food part:
1. Bur-r-r Bank Ice Cream accessed via the side of the engine.  More info and photos
2. Baker's Field Bakery accessed via the "Silver Platter" dining car.  This section had a train mural and actual framed Zephyr memorabilia.  More info and photos

(The bad food puns could have come straight from the Tomlinson Run Railroad, but thank goodness, they didn't!)

Tomlinson Run Railroad

TomlinsonRunRR posted:

 

From 2001 to 2011, the California Adventure Park in Anaheim, CA had a non-operational EMD FP7 cab to which they added a rear section and Disney-manufactured streamliner cars that served food. The observation car at the end sold toys.   The FP7 cab was built in 1952 for the Canadian National Railway as #9104. They rebuilt it in 1973 as #9165, and retired it in 1989. Disney picked it up in Illinois in 1990.

 

I was familiar with the existence of this, but not the details. Thanks for posting that. I only wish I could have seen that when it was still there, as I've yet to get to Disneyland.

A recent post on the Random Photos of Trolley Cars topic caught my eye:

It is of Toronto Transit Commission work car W-1. According to the TTC website, this car was in use from 1911-1967; it was built by the Toronto Railway Company.  What got my attention was the "barrel" shaped roof, which is outlined by bare light bulbs.  This design reminded me of some barrel-roofed diners that also outlined their roof curve in bare light bulbs.  There seemed to be a visual and esthetic connection between these trolley and diner uses.  It's hard to say how functional the lighting would be. (In the background you can see a straight roof line with bulbs, too.)

I set off to find more trolley cars with round roof lines and light bulbs.  There were other historic TTC work cars with rounded roofs, but I only found one other with light bulbs:

C-1, a crane car, is now at the Halton County Railway Museum. Here is the parent link with more photos and information; look in the "Works Cars Image Archive":

  http://transit.toronto.on.ca/streetcar/4510.shtml

(The website says that the C-2 went to the Ohio Railway Museum, but their roster says that it was only the body and it was scrapped.)  In two Google Images searches, no other streetcar companies turned up with rounded roofs that looked like diner roofs. Only TTC so far.

Zooming in on these two photos shows that, while the light bulbs follow the contour of the roof line, they are actually set in the cab wall, not the roof line itself.  Regardless, the three-part ends of the cars, their curved roofs, and the light bulbs remind me of the following diner examples.  All the photographs are mine:

1930s Arthur's Paradise Diner, Lowell, Mass., Worcester Lunch Car Co. You can't see the side divided into three sections like the work cars from this close-up, but it's there. Taken last year:

ca 1933 Kenwood Diner, Spencer, Mass. (taken circa 1978):

The following links have better and more recent photos that show light bulbs actually in the sockets. Unfortunately, Google Maps says that the Kenwood Diner is "Permanently closed".

  https://dinerhunter.com/2011/0...od-diner-spencer-ma/
  http://www.roadarch.com/11/6/kenwood.jpg

1947 Roberto's Cafe, an all-steel diner built on site, Providence, RI (taken 2000). This view shows the sockets for six light bulbs.  Here you can see how the end is divided into three sections:

This lighting feature on diner barrel roofs has always reminded me of something that you might see on a circus wagon or caravan.  Now, it will remind me of two historic TTC cars.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

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Mentioned above is the restored V & T McKeen car at the Nevada RR Museum, as "one of a few surviving".  A poster on here apparently hauled the carcass of one back to Calif. from Alaska.  That makes two.  Where are others?

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

I stumbled across a photo I took a year ago of the O'Mahony Diner at the Illinois Railway Museum. It has been integrated into the restaurant building, although you cannot yet sit at the counter. Most of the interior furnishings appear to be there.IRM y14 [2) Restoration continues.

John 

 

 LCCA PCA TCA

 ILLINOIS RAILWAY MUSEUM        

 www.irm.org   

 

 

 

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I have been reading my book on cable cars. Very interesting read on how fast they designed, built and ran the systems. Each system, about 60, were custom built but the industry, as a whole, didn't last long.  A bunch made money while they lasted. Construction of the track & cars was relatively light weight. Most cars were too light to convert to trolleys. The advantages were they didn't discharge about 10 lbs of manure and gallons of manure on to the city streets each day and using the cable for power they could go up steep hills that  trolleys and trains couldn't.  The 7 or 8 years of their existence were full of patent law suits.

John/Jay Jay,

Thanks for the O'Mahony diner photo and the IRM restoration update.  Let's hope they'll have counter service soon! 

Recently, I was thinking about the Diner Grill. That's the Chicago diner that was built out of two Evanston Railways streetcars, and which you'd alerted us had a fire last Christmas eve 2016. 

Apparently, some work started in June and somebody on Reddit (or was it Yelp?) wrote as recently as 9 September that it looked like some work was being done again.  I found this Facebook page that includes two interior photos (see the first one posted on June 20th and the last one posted on January 18).  Both photos show the curved roof line and the narrow streetcar width that are hidden inside the boxy exterior:

Facebook photos showing streetcar roof line

Jim, interesting reading about cable cars and the contrast with horse-drawn and trolley transportation.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Also, this cable car book is loaded with photos of the major cities in the 1880-90s.  A cable car system was engineered and built(private $$) and operating in a year or two, not years like today.  They had accidents but no details on those.  It sure beat walking: Pgh had three relatively short lines from the downtown area to Oakland and East Liberty areas. It took 1 hr:45 mins to walk it and  30 mins to ride in a cable car about the same today.  The waste from the horses-solid and liquid made the streets too slippery for horses to pull except unpaved surfaces or cobble stone !!  A lot they never told us. TRRR-if you want to look and read this book I could send it to you when I am finished. Let me know.

Jim, thanks for the offer.  I appreciate it.  But at present, I'm running behind with school work and I'm afraid reading it would be a distraction.  I've had several distractions today, in fact, and got no writing done! 

So, having lost the day, your post just inspired me to do a quick Google Image search for cable car restaurant photos.  

Unsurprisingly perhaps, San Francisco has a few , and there were hints of repurposed cable cars elsewhere in the country.

Who would have thought?

Thanks again.

TRRR

My annual school review went well (yeah!), so I have a minute or two to post some of those cable car restaurants ... Unlike diners and rail car and trolleys-turned-diners, I have nothing to say about the "architecture" or any shared RR or popular design elements in these restaurant reuse examples.  These cable car examples are pretty much "as is" and utilitarian.  There's a rail car and lunch wagon example thrown in, too.  This collection represents San Fransisco and San Fransisco as others in the world interpret it.

Enjoy!

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Cable Car Coffee, San Francisco Municipal Railway (1912-present)
900 Market Street, San Francisco, CA

===

Grubstake 1927 to present (a Berkeley, SF, and Oakland rail car and a lunch wagon built to be a diner -- I wonder where they got that? Surviving lunch wagons are rare.)
1525 Pine Street, San Francisco, CA

This place and its rail car's fate were up in the air when I first discovered it.  The rail car's end just sticks out of the front of the building. It's incongruous, but there you have it. I'm glad to read that the restaurant is doing OK via this 2017 Post.

===

Home edition

1632 Great Highway, Carville-by-the-sea (SF), CA.  A house made from a cable car and a horse car; the second story is made from two cable cars. (OK, it's not a restaurant but it's got a kitchen -- that counts for something, right?)  Gorgeous interior photo.

===

Japanese Coffee Edition

Another SF Cable Car Municipal Railway example, car no. 8, some where in Japan (?) circa 2010, per this blog post.

===

Apparently San Francisco and its imagery is a big hit in Bangalore, India.  Some of these look like gondola cars to me but perhaps its just how they cut the cars to create individual dining spaces?  There's the ubiquitous San Francisco Municipal Railway in maroon (?) and one in the railway's Powell & Hyde Sts. livery (see website for that one).  It's kinda like those two U.S. spaghetti chains with their token trolley, only this hotel restaurant is more upscale and they serve only vegetarian Italian and Indian food:

Check out the hotel's website:

 

 

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Greg Nagy posted:

Between 1938 diner moved to new home at lincoln highway museum and vintage diner ready for debut at irwin theater, it looks like Rt 30 is becoming a restored diner lovers destination. 

Greg, thanks for keeping us posted!  It's great to see these items preserved.  I don't have time at present to research the prior history or builders of the diners, but maybe later?  Can you tell us whose RR tracks are on the left in the (south) Pittsburgh photo in the first newspaper link that you provided?  I'm pretty sure that the Union Railroad has tracks to the east of the location shown.

Of particular interest, although a tangent to this post, is the red and white object in between the river, the tracks, and the diner on the move in the photo in the article you linked to.  Here's a close-up from the internet:

It's the paddle wheel from the 1940 steam tow boat "Jason", once owned by the Union Barge Line in Pittsburgh, PA.  I've shared elsewhere that my grandfather moved from working in the ticket office for the Pennsylvania Railroad to the Dravo Corporation, who owned Union Barge.  He was superintendent of transportation, where he made sure that goods got from Pittsburgh, PA to New Orleans and back -- especially during WWII.  I'd been trying to research railroad interactions but with little success.

Someday I'd love to have a riverside intermodal scene with the rail lines, barges, and an O-scale model of one of the Union Barge tow boats.  Here's a scan of a publicity shot of the Jason that my father had in his collection:

I'm 90% sure that's Neville Island in the background.  Located on the Ohio, Neville Island would also make for an interesting railroad-ship building/intermodal layout.  I know that some of you have these kind of scenes on your layouts and the ones that I've seen are awesome!  Many complete with modeled wave action and reflections as seen in the photo above.

Now back to our regularly scheduled programming ... diners, rail cars, and trolleys! :-}  (And my school work! )

Tomlinson Run Railroad

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TomlinsonRunRR posted:
Greg Nagy posted:

Between 1938 diner moved to new home at lincoln highway museum and vintage diner ready for debut at irwin theater, it looks like Rt 30 is becoming a restored diner lovers destination. 

Greg, thanks for keeping us posted!  It's great to see these items preserved.  I don't have time at present to research the prior history or builders of the diners, but maybe later?  Can you tell us whose RR tracks are on the left in the (south) Pittsburgh photo in the first newspaper link that you provided?  I'm pretty sure that the Union Railroad has tracks to the east of the location shown.

 

 

<....>

 

Now back to our regularly scheduled programming ... diners, rail cars, and trolleys! :-}  (And my school work! )

Tomlinson Run Railroad

What, you mean the tracks that run right by this building?    

Currently there is a 50/50 chance it belongs to NS or CSX, since it was part of CONRAIL. 

I believe that CSX has the intermodal terminal on that line below the point. 

Another photo of the O'Mahony diner at Illinois Railway Museum, taken today. Still no counter service, but they have booths, a counter, and other fixtures inside, but not affixed. Food service is in the restaurant building to which it is attached. I'm getting hungry out here.

DSC_0339

 

John 

 

 LCCA PCA TCA

 ILLINOIS RAILWAY MUSEUM        

 www.irm.org   

 

 

 

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John,

That's a great photo (and you are clearly having a much nicer Memorial Day than here in rainy Massachusetts).  The exterior restoration looks excellent in that photo.  The chrome really shines!  Interesting they haven't added a name or other signage to the enamel sides -- perhaps intentional to keep the lines clean?  I hope you eventually got a bite to eat.

Thanks for keeping this thread going while I continue to slog through school work (or rather today it's more like finding distractions ).

Tomlinson Run Railroad

The Pacific Dining Car

Last night I did a quick search on the Pacific Electric Railway and stumbled on this awkward looking but interesting gem once located in Los Angeles, CA:

The "trained" eye will notice that the proportions and windows are all "wrong" but curiously, the building has steel wheels.   I would call this an "on-site" diner in the tradition of restaurants that were built on-site, rather than in a factory, but were made to look like a factory-made diner, rail car, or trolley.

According to the Pacific Dining Car restaurant's website, this building was inspired by a rail car restaurant that the owners saw while living in New York.  It was built in 1921 and designed to be like a rail car but with more interior space. 

What's particularly interesting is that it was built with steel wheels so that it could be moved about to different rented lots.  In other words, it was built like a rail car but with the traditional wheels of a true diner (restaurant), in order to be moved about easily.  In fact, it was moved once -- so those wheels were a very smart idea.

You can read all about the original restaurant here.  They are still in business and have a second restaurant in Santa Monica.  (Note that the intro says that this restaurant was "born in a railway train car" and then goes on to say it was built from scratch. Sigh. )

Tomlinson Run Railroad

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Some Old Friends and Some New -- rail car restaurants of Southern California

This nice PBS article from 26 June 2014, "Trains Kept A-Rolling: .." has great pictures and background history on rail service in Southern California before introducing seven cars converted to restaurants.  Some we've discussed before like Barstow Station McDonald's, Carney's (Studio City), the Formosa (W. Hollywood), and the Red Wagon Cafe (Shafter).  But three were new to me, and one I hadn't posted yet.

Click on the link above to see the photos.   In addition to the photos the article provides information on public transportation near by.  Nice idea.

Here's a summary:

The Sidecar Restaurant (Ventura), formerly the DeLuxe Diner (not to be confused with the NJ one) is said to be a 1906 Pullman, which was later used as a pie-car (diner) for the Hagenbeck Wallace Circus.  I also found a listing that said the car was built in 1910.  It started life as a restaurant in 1933.  It was closed in 2014.

Il Treno (Vernon) was operated from 1988 to 2010 and was still on site but empty in 2014.  It's a silversides and I love the neon sign shown in the article.  A Yelp! review advised not to go in the winter because "one of the cars" didn't have heat.  So, apparently, there were at least two cars making up this restaurant.

The owners of Il Treno run Le Vigne (Paso Robles), which is still in business.  It's a vineyard that apparently has some additional railcars but I couldn't find any photos.

I don't think that I've posted about the Vintage Steak House (1927 Pullman) in San Juan Capistrano yet, but it is (or was) located inside an ATSF freight station.  My source said the station was built in 1887, the article says 1894.  The latter date is confirmed by the website for its current incarnation -- check out the great interior photo with the Western Union sign, among other great photos: Trevors at the Tracks

The interior and exterior Trackside Tavern are beautiful but I didn't see anything about the dining car still being inside in my quick read before work.  I doubt it would go with the current decor.

Enjoy ... or should I say "savor"?

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Back about 30 years ago, my friend Ron and I stopped at a Diner converted over from a Interurban,  It was in front of a big hotel on US 20 down around Monroeville, Ohio.  It had pictures of the car when running from Cleveland to Toledo.  I remember that the songs on the Jukebox hadn't been changed in over 20 years.  So most were from early 60's....  Does anyone know what became of this car???

Marty

"Buy another round of track for the boys"

Martin Derouin posted:

Back about 30 years ago, my friend Ron and I stopped at a Diner converted over from a Interurban,  It was in front of a big hotel on US 20 down around Monroeville, Ohio.  It had pictures of the car when running from Cleveland to Toledo.  I remember that the songs on the Jukebox hadn't been changed in over 20 years.  So most were from early 60's....  Does anyone know what became of this car???

Marty

Hi Marty,

Was it this one?:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...ilson1949/4296101177

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...lson1949/4296101297/

I'll see whether I can dig up more when I get home from work -- there is one website that may describe its fate.  Others may beat me to it .

Best,

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Yup. I thought that the Monroeville, OH diner looked familiar and that I would find it mentioned on the diner page for the Hickscarworks blog (brought to us by the fine folks at the Illinois Railway Museum).  Here's the subsection:
= = = =

Monroeville, O.

Just like Gasoline Alley! This nameless diner was the body of Lake Shore Electric #171, a 1918 steel Jewett. Here we see Norm Krentel and Jeff Brady examining it in May 1979. It was obviously out of business. I hopefully suggested that IRM should acquire it and keep it as a diner. Of course nothing came of that idea. Several years later, however, the body was acquired by Seashore with the eventual intention of restoring it as an interurban car. Good luck!
= = = =
As you can see the Hickscarworks topic has embedded links and says that the body went to the Seashore Trolley Museum.  From looking at the flickr photo links in my previous reply, I wondered whether the car had been extended -- it looks awfully long in those photos.   The Seashore Museum's history says the car was built by the Jewett Car Company and is 61' long; the page includes other stats.  Here's their thumbnail photo:

Lake Shore Electric Railway 171

Hey, I'm headed up to Maine this week.  Who knows?  Maybe a side trip is in order?

Tomlinson Run Railroad

jay jay posted:

Here is a night shot of the O'Mahony Diner at IRM, taken last Saturday. =snap=

DSC_0602

John,  Fantastic photo!  Great composition and color.  I wondered whether they were serving food or not yet.  Does IRM have an ETA for completion?

Monroeville Update: I just got back from Maine. Unfortunately, I ran into the usual elder care visit snafus needing my attention.  By the time I drove past the Seashore Trolley Museum exit, it was long past closing time.  Oh well, the interurban's shell is probably tucked away in storage somewhere anyway. 

TRRR

Greg,

Thanks for the heads-up.  Wolfe's Diner is an early 1950s O'Mahoney diner.  Here's a link with a (copyrighted) photo, if you scroll just past midway:

http://www.roadarch.com/diners/pa2.html

That blog also has a link to an interior photo.

I don't have any more info on this diner in my files other than what is stated there.  It's had that same name and location for a long time.

This building will look very familiar to those of you with a Plasticville Diner.  It's schoolwork day, but I'll try and post a photo of my painting-in-progress diner later.  The model, of course, doesn't have the curved glass windows at the ends, but the model otherwise nails the O'Mahoney look.  (More 1950s chrome-galore to my eye than railcar or trolley.)

Tomlinson Run Railroad 

Picked up a book recently,related to this subject, (l hope), "Dining By Rail", James D. Porterfield.  It explores providing food for rail travelers, it's origin and development.  About a third of the book comprises dining car entree menus for over fifty different railroads (if you can cook far better than l) .It addresses the Harvey Girls, and the Big Shanty hotel meal stop that provided the opportunity for The Great Locomotive Chase.  

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

jay jay posted:

Here is a good story about  The Bull Moose Bar & Grille,a restaurant in "Teddy Roosevelt's Railroad Car" in Sandwich, IL (DeKalb County).     https://explorationamerica.com...lJdt_5n5fzDfRYHhzB0k

John,

Those were absolutely amazing photos of the interior!  The ones I'd seen before and notes about exterior restaurant updates suggested that the car had been chopped up a bit.  It certainly doesn't look like it from those photos.  Wow.

I thought I had previously posted a photo of the right end when it had a fake front made to look like a streamliner engine.  (That was removed around 2011.)   I could 't find a post in this thread, so maybe I'm thinking of the Hicks Car Works page?  There are also pix on Pinterest.

My notes taken from that source (Hicks) said the car was built by the American Car Foundary in 1904, and was CB&Q passenger car #4438.  It was retired at Eola in 1933. 

So much for Teddy Roosevelt and for the 1893 Columbian Exhibition stories :-).

Tomlinson Run Railroad

 

 

colorado hirailer posted:

Picked up a book recently,related to this subject, (l hope), "Dining By Rail", James D. Porterfield.  It explores providing food for rail travelers, it's origin and development.  About a third of the book comprises dining car entree menus for over fifty different railroads (if you can cook far better than l) .It addresses the Harvey Girls, and the Big Shanty hotel meal stop that provided the opportunity for The Great Locomotive Chase.  

"Dining by Rail" is an excellent source book!  I was really impressed by Porterfield's research, story telling, and the various facts about things like how much milk, apples, meat the RR dining cars used in a year (see page 102).  I'll definitely want to read and reread the entire history section.  

I tried a couple of recipes from the cookbook half but don't remember much about them.  The PRR celery with roquefort cheese is from a PRR cookbook available on the web.  I've served it several times with success.

The stories about guys hawking food in baskets up and down the isles and of how rushed and crowded train stops at station restaraunts were in the early days are really interesting.  Then came the hotel inspired dining cars and the Harvey Houses.

TRRR  

A Dining Car Story from the 1930s?

The mention of Porterfield's book reminded me of my recent Thanksgiving visit with my 95-year old (railfan) mother.  She started telling a story I'd never heard before about wanting to be a "stewardess".  

She really liked how the stewardesses dressed and how nice they looked.  And she thought it would be fun to serve people and travel.  She has some memory issues and she liked to fly, so it took me a while to figure out that she was speaking about working on a railroad dining car and not an airplane.

My mother was under the age to be allowed to travel on her own as a stewardess -- especially on any long distance trains that went west of Pittsburgh, and where she would have to stay over night.  So she asked her father, who worked for the PRR, to contact someone important enough who could give her permission to travel.  She was disappointed when he didn't jump right on it.  Instead, my grandfather suggested that my mother learn more about the job first.  (My grandfather was a very smart man .)

Well, when she found out that she would have to wash the dishes as well as serve, that shot down that dream in a hurry! :-).  My mother found some way to save face when telling her father that she was no longer interested, without having to mention not wanting to wash dishes.

I've heard of stewards but not stewardesses on trains, so unless anyone can confirm its usage, I asume that she meant waitress.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

And speaking of Porterfield's book, "Dining by Rail", I recently stumbled on this 1904 Frederick Burr Opper Alphonse and Gaston cartoon. 

Notice how the porter announces "Three minutes for refreshments" in the first panel? As mentioned in a previous post, Porterfield's Chapter 1,  "A Half-hour to Indigestion", does a great job of capturing how rushed station "refreshment" stops were.   But I believe he wrote that the stops were for a more luxurious ten minutes, not three as in this cartoon! :-). 

At present, I've no time to do diner-dining-car-trolley-train station restaraunt conversion research.  In the meanwhile, I thought you might enjoy seeing this train station "refreshments" cartoon:

Tomlinson Run Railroad

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3AB25EA2-2ADB-45DF-9DB1-9BB7228F757ETwo items to add to this discussion: Empire diner in NYC, one of my favorites for aesthetic appeal, and Weber’s Grill in Orillia, Ontario. Weber’s has incorporated many boxcars, a caboose, and passenger cars to outfit the eating experience on Route 11. http://webers.com/#aboutus

A google search provides a healthy sampling of images to satisfy any appetite. I haven’t recently visited, so no personal pictures. 

Railroad modeling is a great place to make good friends. 

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C&OSteam, thanks for the post of the ever-so-photogenic Empire Diner.  That's a great photo.  For the curious, it's an iconic Fodero Dining Car Company diner, built in 1946.

Thanks for telling us about Weber's Hamburgers (est. 1963).  You are right, a quick web search turned up several photos.  

The Wikipedia article says that the first three cars (boxcars presumably) they bought were Canadian National Railway cars and they are used for storing and processing the hamburger meat.  Five more cars were added, apparently including some from U.S. roads.

One car is apparently used for dining, another for an office, and one for "washroom facilities".  I don't know enough about body design and eras to ID the two steel passenger cars -- maybe someone else can?

A photo on Pinterest says the 1903 caboose, CN 77247, started out life with the Grand Trunk Railroad.

And, the menu says they serve poutine.  Ewwee!  

I have recently had a chance to document and collect photos for two additional New Jersey rehab'd restaurant railcars.  Thanks for the post, it's just what I needed to jump start those write-ups.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

I recently bought a heavy, large book but the design and use of RR passenger cars and equipment from day 1. Included is whole chapter on the RR dining cars, the design and operation of them. They weren't popular with RR management because they were a lot of work and not much profit.

Sounds like a great book, Jim, and that chapter in particular.  As I understand it, dining cars lost money but they were a necessary selling and competitive point for long distance travel.  Can you post the name of the book when you have a moment?  Is it still in print?  I'm particularly interested in the operation aspect of the dining cars and kitchens.  

TRRR

TomlinsonRunRR posted:

 

I've heard of stewards but not stewardesses on trains, so unless anyone can confirm its usage, I asume that she meant waitress.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Northern Pacific had stewardesses on its North Coast Limited and used them in advertising literature in the '50's.  

http://www.oil-electric.com/20...tewardess-nurse.html

"Stewardess-Nurse" would be more accurate.

 

Carl

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