As mentioned on the "What Did You Do On Your Layout Today" topic, the somewhat distressed 1225 Berk I picked up off of forum member Serge was a bit more distressed than I realized, as the gear train let go at Glitchcon.  So, here's a look under the hood as I got the 1225 back up to snuff! 

 

As a bonus, here's a RW in the shop for whistle contact cleaning (for the benefit of those who haven't seen RW guts before):

 

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Disassembly of the 1225 is straightforward, with two screws under the cab and two under the steam cylinders.  Here's the chassis sans boiler casting:

 

 

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I did have to replace a broken ground wire going to the trailing truck.  The contact and trailing truck need to be removed from the shell before taking it off.

 

Here's the underside with the roller pickup and bottom plate removed.  Note the clever connection for track power (the brass captive nut).  Also note the cam on the front axle for driving the smoke unit.

 

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The old motor/worm gear and geared axle.

 

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The top of the motor.  Note that Lionel put two different flywheels for different versions of the 1225 onto the motor; be sure you have the right one before ordering a replacement!

 

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The chassis with the motor and axle removed.  Note the various indexing slots for the journal bearings.

 

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Old and new motor and axle.  Coming from a heritage of postwar Lionels that seem to last nearly forever, I find this amount of wear after ten years of use somewhat disheartening.

 

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The new axle in place.  It's easier to replace the axle, then install the motor and reconnect the side rods.

 

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Disaster struck when one of the shoulder screws broke off in a wheel.  I wound up having to reinstall the old axle temporarily, until I can get that screw removed:

 

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With a temporary screw in place, the Berk was tested for a couple of laps sans shell.

 

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While I waited for new shoulder screws and traction tires, I reinstalled the shell.  The new screws and tires arrived Wednesday 8/12, and were duly installed.  ProTip:  You have to have the screws off the rods in order to install new tires. 

 

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With new motor and traction tires, the 1225 was ready to hit the rails!

 

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And here's an artist's conception of how it performed! 

 

dragtrain

Hope this helps! 

 

Mitch

 

It's crackers to give a rozzer the dropsy in snide!

 

Remember, SCROUNGE!

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Original Post
Originally Posted by M. Mitchell Marmel:

...

Old and new motor and axle.  Coming from a heritage of postwar Lionels that seem to last nearly forever, I find this amount of wear after ten years of use somewhat disheartening.

 

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ok, now i finally see a reason some collectors never take a new production locomotive out of the box.

 

pretty sad.

...gary

 

it looks like this 1225 is not too much trick to open I strongly think I have a lazy smoke piston or broken either way it’s smokes but weak and often no puff to it any other tricks I should know to fix this? it’s a super nice engine that was rarely run by the past owner

rebuilder posted:

it looks like this 1225 is not too much trick to open I strongly think I have a lazy smoke piston or broken either way it’s smokes but weak and often no puff to it any other tricks I should know to fix this? it’s a super nice engine that was rarely run by the past owner

Examine the piston.  Should look like this:  

If the bracket is off or one or both of the balls are out,  the piston won't work right.   Good luck!  Keep us posted on your progress.

Mitch 

It's crackers to give a rozzer the dropsy in snide!

 

Remember, SCROUNGE!

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Nice Mitch!  Any chance you happened to count out the gear ratio while you were in there?

Another possible factor in the wear... most of the newer locos are geared much lower with a single-thread worm (as opposed to a triple-thread worm on a 736.)  Don't get me wrong, the lower gear ratio and slower speeds are much preferred.  Lionel could have gained back some longevity by using a steel worm, and a bronze (or brass) worm wheel.

Ten years is still a long time.  Not a problem, as long as spare parts are available.

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

The worm on the new replacement looks to be a larger diameter, is this just an illusion of the photograph? If both the worm and the worm gear are brass, that would explain why they failed so early. For better wear characteristics, the worm should be steel with a brass worm gear. Just another example of cheapening the product through poor engineering practice at the expense of product longevity. Might want to get a spare set of parts while they are still available...

Bill in FtL

Ted S posted:

Nice Mitch!  Any chance you happened to count out the gear ratio while you were in there?

Sorry,  no. 

Ten years is still a long time.  Not a problem, as long as spare parts are available.

As opposed to, say, my 1666 which is still going strong 73 years later?

Bill Nielsen posted:

The worm on the new replacement looks to be a larger diameter, is this just an illusion of the photograph?

Just an illusion of the shadows in the photo.   

Might want to get a spare set of parts while they are still available...

Another contrast with postwar:  With postwar, you can get the worm and gear by themselves.  With the modern [rhymes with snap], the best you can do is get an entire axle and an entire motor assembly... 

Mitch 

It's crackers to give a rozzer the dropsy in snide!

 

Remember, SCROUNGE!

M. Mitchell Marmel posted:
 

Another contrast with postwar:  With postwar, you can get the worm and gear by themselves.  With the modern [rhymes with snap], the best you can do is get an entire axle and an entire motor assembly.

True for the 773, and F-units with horizontal motors.  For everything else, the worm was cut into the armature shaft (and not all armatures were alike.)  Not arguing, I agree with you!  This is one of the pet peeves I have with a lot of modern-era designs.  Even the new Legacy brass hybrid has the worm pressed onto the motor shaft.  Transferring that gear to another motor will be difficult or impossible.  So the "spare part" I was thinking of is a motor complete with worm and flywheel.

They made enough of these baby Berks that cannibalism will be a viable strategy 20 years from now.  Some of the rarer, more expensive items made this way will end up as shelf displays 

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

Ted S posted:

They made enough of these baby Berks that cannibalism will be a viable strategy 20 years from now.  

Heck,  cannibalism is a viable strategy now.  Where do you think Lionel gets its spares?   

Mitch 

It's crackers to give a rozzer the dropsy in snide!

 

Remember, SCROUNGE!

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