Union Pacific approach lighted signals

Business travel on Interstate 20 has me driving alongside the former Texas & Pacific line from Monahans to Pecos, TX.    Uncle Pete upgraded all the signaling (CTC) with "Darth Vader" style signals which are normally dark until approached.  Today on my drive  the signals were lit; the home and headblock signals of sidings and all the intermediate block signals.  A lack of train movements showed ALL RED at the sidings with a progression of YELLOW, FLASHING YELLOW, GREEN in the advance blocks.  A route cleared through a station dropped all the advance block signals to GREEN.  It was pleasant to see.

Signals are an aspect of railroading that have always held my interest.  And even though I understand the benefits of approach lit signals, I still reserve the right to strongly dislike them.  Does anyone know of a UP policy change or some such that would explain what I saw today?

ne1

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I haven't been out on the west end of the old T&P for quite a few years, so I can't say for certain, but what you describe sounds like things have been speeded up.  

I do hope you passed Borracho on Clear signals.  The T&P and the SP were racing to see who could get to Sierra Blanca first, and thereby win the land grants for the right of way to be built west of there.  The T&P was ahead, and all but certain to be the winner.  Construction had reached the location of today's siding at Borracho, when a number of wagons rolled over the horizon and headed straight to the T&P construction gang.  In the wagons were numerous  willing women and a large amount of whiskey.  Supervisors lost control of the workers for a couple of days, during which the SP kept building and reached Sierra Blanca ahead of T&P. 

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

In 1881, I really don't know if there was a Rule G, but -- if there was one -- it certainly had a different interpretation, as nearly everybody, top to bottom, on the railroad had a hollow leg, so to speak.

What could they have done for such a rule violation in remote far west Texas in 1881 -- fire the entire gang?    The Commanches had only been forced to surrender two years previously, and there was nobody else out there.

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

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