As I continue to slowly acquire PFE cars for my 1940’s era Big Boy, I’ve noticed during research that many PFE trains had a few livestock cars right behind the engine.  I’ll assume the front placement was so that the crew could tend to the animals. Unfortunately, what the B&W pictures and videos I’ve seen do not reveal is the color of the livestock cars.  I’m of the unsubstantiated opinion that the livestock cars were brown during the 40’s then later changing to yellow, possibly around the same post-war time as was done to the Caboose’s.  

Thoughts, model recommendations?  

Thanks

Original Post
PRR 5841 posted:

As I continue to slowly acquire PFE cars for my 1940’s era Big Boy, I’ve noticed during research that many PFE trains had a few livestock cars right behind the engine.  I’ll assume the front placement was so that the crew could tend to the animals. Unfortunately, what the B&W pictures and videos I’ve seen do not reveal is the color of the livestock cars.  I’m of the unsubstantiated opinion that the livestock cars were brown during the 40’s then later changing to yellow, possibly around the same post-war time as was done to the Caboose’s.  

Thoughts, model recommendations?  

Thanks

May I suggest that you contact the UPHS (Union Pacific Historical Society) and ask them?

Hot Water posted:
PRR 5841 posted:

As I continue to slowly acquire PFE cars for my 1940’s era Big Boy, I’ve noticed during research that many PFE trains had a few livestock cars right behind the engine.  I’ll assume the front placement was so that the crew could tend to the animals. Unfortunately, what the B&W pictures and videos I’ve seen do not reveal is the color of the livestock cars.  I’m of the unsubstantiated opinion that the livestock cars were brown during the 40’s then later changing to yellow, possibly around the same post-war time as was done to the Caboose’s.  

Thoughts, model recommendations?  

Thanks

May I suggest that you contact the UPHS (Union Pacific Historical Society) and ask them?

Thanks HW.  While your suggestion is appreciated, my experiences with various Historical Societies (Including UPHS) about prototype details has been underwhelming.  The term “Historic” is a broad brush that covers a wide range of topics in railroading.  Locomotive and freight car details represent only a small fraction of the topics any HS would be reasonably expected to cover.  The collective knowledge that exits on this forum, especially where model detailing is concerned, almost always exceeds whatever I have been able to glean from HS’s.

The practice of placing loaded stock cars at the front of a train, behind the motive power, was to minimize the possibility of animal injuries or death, due to rough car action as slack ran in and out while running.  It's also the cause load shifting and damaged freight in the cars.

The farther back a car was in a train, the more severe that action could be. Cabooses riding at the rear of a train had long handrails attached to the ceiling, end to end.  The crew members riding there were ever mind full about slack action. Even then, some were seriously injured at times.

S. Islander

 

Add Reply

Likes (0)
Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×