I got 2 crossovers cut and soldered and laid out some track to start the process. Dave Detert DoubleDAZ helped me with design work. I'm not looking forward to cutting the 45 cross overs as though I did get practice ruining several 90s LOL. I finally decided on cutting one side of the 90s  and leaving the other full length which will off set it 4 inches instead of going right down the middle. This design may look a little odd but I have a vision of where my scenery will fit and I am a looper at heart.

CC1C2

Attachments

Images (3)
Original Post

Dave, Nice job on cutting the crossovers!  What is your intent for the straight line tracks?  Bump and go trolleys, perhaps?

Cutting tracks always sounds easy, and I suppose it is with the right tools, but I figured you’d have trouble with the 45s and 90s. Harbor Freight sells a 4” Might Mite table saw for under $40 that might have made cutting easier. A disk sander probably helps too for fine tuning the lengths. I have to admit I look forward to seeing the landscaping to see why you wanted this type of design.

@Mark Boyce posted:

Dave, Nice job on cutting the crossovers!  What is your intent for the straight line tracks?  Bump and go trolleys, perhaps?

Just a pass through to no where, I look at it as a means to get some where in my imaginary world. In the future I have enough room to do a 2 x 14 switching area that this could butt up against forming a large T.  This layout is on large casters and rolls very easy especially compared to the 10 x 20 that I downsized from. This way even if I do extensions which would be against walls I can still move the main section for access and upkeep. At my present pace with work and on call for work I don't foresee the additions this year.

Dave D, those are great suggestions for Dave R.  I have cut track before in N and HO scales.  I always did it with a razor saw.  That is a lot of work with O gauge track, as I found out cutting some Fastrack for a Christmas layout.  I am not able to control my Dremel tool any more for using a cutoff disk, so I was back to cutting GarGraves track just yesterday with the razor saw.  I still ended up with cuts not quite where I wanted them.  As you recall, I have a few cuts to make.  I just looked the 4" Mighty Mite saw on Harbor's website.  As always positive and negative reviews.  Most negative ones don't offer why.    In a few pages, the only practical suggestion was "Would be nice if it had a fence.", but he gave it 5 stars.  My guess is most people who posted negative are trying to make it cut through too much.  I'll look into it farther.

@DoubleDAZ posted:

Cutting tracks always sounds easy, and I suppose it is with the right tools, but I figured you’d have trouble with the 45s and 90s. Harbor Freight sells a 4” Might Mite table saw for under $40 that might have made cutting easier. A disk sander probably helps too for fine tuning the lengths. I have to admit I look forward to seeing the landscaping to see why you wanted this type of design.

Dave, I have that saw I never thought about using it for track. I'll have to find it I haven't seen it since I bought it LOL.

Mark, I don’t have the saw, but someone else mentioned it or one like it in another thread. Like with any site, you have to take reviews with a grain of salt. Too many expect more quality than Harbor Freight is able to deliver. I haven’t had a problem with anything I’ve bought from them using it as intended. I’m not sure what people expect from a $40 table saw with a 4” blade and I know what you mean when they don’t provide examples or more explanations.

Dave R, sounds like a plan for the straight through tracks!!

Dave D, I agree a person needs to take into account what they are paying and the size, power, etc.  I haven’t purchased any power tools from them, but other products were okay for occasional light use.

Speaking as someone who is experienced with woodworking and power tools, the mighty-mite saw looks dangerous.  The small footprint and tiny fence would make it difficult to cut track safely.  Also, I don't think the diamond blade will work well for the non-metal parts of a piece of track.  

If you have a few pieces to cut, use a hacksaw or a dremel (make a few practice cuts).  If you have a lot, look into a metal-cutting band saw or a metal cut-off saw - you'll spend more money, but you'll work more safely and save a ton of frustration.

I buy some stuff at Harbor Freight (very selectively), but their power tools are false economy.  

Mallard, Thank you for your insight!!  I just cut another piece of GarGraves track with a hacksaw.  With as few as I will have to do, I'll save my money...and my fingers...and more...

Last edited by Mark Boyce
@Mark Boyce posted:

Mallard, Thank you for your insight!!  I just cut another piece of GarGraves track with a hacksaw.  With as few as I will have to do, I'll save my money...and my fingers...and more...

Cutting GarGraves with a hacksaw is a great fitness program!

Just before the lock-down I needed to trim dual gauge (Standard gauge/O Gauge) Gargraves flex track ends for a friend of mine. Easy-peasy with a Dremel and a reinforced cut-off disk.

The hard part was curving the darn 5 rail track!

5 rail gargraves

 

Attachments

Images (1)
Last edited by Lionelski

Add Reply

Post
The Track Planning and Layout Design Forum is sponsored by

AN OGR FORUM CHARTER SPONSOR
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×