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Week 3 of Weathering Wednesday has arrived. Our first 2 episodes have shown us some GREAT weathering work. It has inspired me and my son, Chris, to seek out new projects of our own. I hope that those of you that have posted your fine artistry have more to show us. Also, I hope that those of you that have not shown us your work and those of you who have taken your first shot at weathering will join our topic and, also, share your work.

But before we start, here are the forum ground rules as so stated by my good friend Patrick Whitehead (aka trumptrain), host of the popular topic of this type, Switcher Saturday:

  • Have fun and enjoy!
  • Post only photos that you have taken.  
  • If you post a photo taken by someone else or a copyrighted photo be sure you have express written permission from the photo's owner to post their photo.  
  • Any individual who posts copy written material is subject to legal liability.  Furthermore that individual will be banned from the OGR Forum.  
  • Please consult the OGR Forum TOS (Terms of Service) for further information regarding copyrights.

I, again, will get things started. Below are before and after photos of one of Chris' projects. You will find the difference striking.

The first photo is an inexpensive, plastic, Lionel MPC era hopper. Its detail such as ladders, grab irons and rivets are molded as parts of the car body.

weathered

Chris' weathering, in addition to increasing realism by making it look as if it was many years in service on the road, brings out the molded in "detail" making a plastic toy look more like a viable model. Also, our custom coal load using real chips of coal, enhance the weathering to make a great model at an affordable price.

weathered3

Chris does this entire process with rattle-can, flat-finish, camouflage spray paint colors as well as paper towels to wipe away excess color. Note that Chris' rust-colored paint makes the plastic trucks and coupler look more like weathered metal and also brings out the molded detail in the truck frames.

Chris is trying to find time from his busy daytime work schedule to, in the future, do a video explaining his technique to share with our Weathering Wednesday Readers and participants. So, stay tuned.

Now it is your turn to share your finished products and techniques so we can all enjoy and benefit from your artistry and experience.

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weathered

Chris' weathering, in addition to increasing realism by making it look as if it was many years in service on the road, brings out the molded in "detail" making a plastic toy look more like a viable model. Also, our custom coal load using real chips of coal, enhance the weathering to make a great model at an affordable price.

weathered3

I always get a kick out of someone doing this sort of thing. Is it a scale model with applied details, costing $75 and breakable by a sneeze? Nope - but that (good) weathering job raised a toy to something at least emulating a model.



Hi Randy,

Nice thread and I've yet to participate. Maybe you could keep the same thread going from week to week instead of starting a new one. That way new and old can look through it for years to come and get a weathering education. Just a suggestion.

Dave

@luvindemtrains

Dave:

Thank you for your comments. I originally did put iteration 2 of Weathering Wednesday as a tag-on to the end of the first. But, yesterday, my friend Pat Whitehead (aka trumptrain) and I talked about the thread. Pat used to host Team Track Tuesday and now hosts Switcher Saturday. Pat was the one who suggested that I make it a separate topic each week.

I do plan to make this a long-running topic. I do like your idea for the reason you cited. So, next week, I may go back to tagging it on to the original thread.

Again, thank you for your suggestion. Also, I enjoy seeing your layout progress. Your modeling and scenery are second to none!!!!

Here's an MTH RailKing B&O gondola which I lightly weathered.  I created the junk load without any intension of doing so.  One evening I was on top of my layout table working on scenery.  I had forgotten to place on the table the coffee can where I toss  debris.  Within my reach was this B&O gondola, so I began filling it with debris with no intention at all of creating a junk load.   When I finished my work a couple hours later the gon was full.  It was then that I noticed a great looking junk load had been created without any  intention of doing so.  Go figure!   I did take it on myself to paint some of the pieces (  rust colored )  that were in newly created by chance junk load.  

Here the car is shown within the context of a scene.

Click on image to enlarge. IMG_7964IMG_8030IMG_8011IMG_7937IMG_7933IMG_7936IMG_7935IMG_7934

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Last edited by trumptrain

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